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(News On 6 Tulsa)   13-year-old boy's postcard mailed in 1967 finally reaches his mom. Well, how fast did you expect it to arrive for just 4 cents?   (newson6.com) divider line 34
    More: Followup, Jacobson, Tulsa, Hereford  
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7477 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 11:04 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-17 11:10:06 AM  
images.wikia.com

The mailman in question?

/Realized the other day that this Western Union guy was also the "Ya jackass!" guy from "Happy Gilmore".
 
2013-02-17 11:10:41 AM  
Probably marked Postage Due
 
2013-02-17 11:11:45 AM  
This kid is a vampire.  Or a time traveller.
 
2013-02-17 11:15:31 AM  
 
2013-02-17 11:21:23 AM  
That's some great investigating there. "Why did it happen?" "No fricken clue." "Should we ask the post office about it?" "Nah."
 
2013-02-17 11:24:59 AM  
It took them that long to find someone in Oklahoma who could read.
 
2013-02-17 11:32:29 AM  
The post office still remains the greatest deal on the planet. If I had to otherwise send a letter to the middle of nowhere in Kentucky, I feel like it would cost me significantly more than 42 cents to get someone to do that for me.
 
2013-02-17 11:33:32 AM  
DEAR MOM, SEND ME MY MEDS. MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH. HURRY.
 
2013-02-17 11:33:53 AM  
That is incredible handwriting for a 13-year-old boy. Most adults I know can't write that well.
 
2013-02-17 11:39:01 AM  
46 years? That's nothing.
 
2013-02-17 11:39:26 AM  

TimonC346: The post office still remains the greatest deal on the planet. If I had to otherwise send a letter to the middle of nowhere in Kentucky, I feel like it would cost me significantly more than 42 cents to get someone to do that for me.


Government doesn't work. If the postal service works, it must be destroyed to show that government doesn't work.
 
2013-02-17 11:44:37 AM  

TimonC346: The post office still remains the greatest deal on the planet. If I had to otherwise send a letter to the middle of nowhere in Kentucky, I feel like it would cost me significantly more than 42 cents to get someone to do that for me.


It does.  46 cents.
 
2013-02-17 12:05:34 PM  
FTA: Bert sent the postcard on a trip with his father and cousins to the east coast to buy concrete trucks and mixing equipment for the family business.

He's lucky it ever got there what with sending it on trips and all.
 
2013-02-17 12:06:02 PM  
"Under a piece of machinery? I don't know. I have no idea," says Jacobson about why it took so long to deliver the letter.

heehawmarketing.typepad.com

NEWMAN!!!
 
2013-02-17 12:17:05 PM  
That's what happens when you send a letter using an eighteenth-class stamp.

i21.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-17 12:18:33 PM  
I bet the post office will say if they had a rate increase and paid their union workers
more, this kind of thing wouldn't happen  LOL.
 
2013-02-17 12:27:33 PM  

Bith Set Me Up: /Realized the other day that this Western Union guy was also the "Ya jackass!" guy from "Happy Gilmore".


And for old farts like, he'll always be Count Floyd.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-17 12:35:39 PM  

Left-Handed Spatula: That is incredible handwriting for a 13-year-old boy. Most adults I know can't write that well.


Have you ever seen some of the letters home from the WWII era? Not only is much of the penmanship impeccable, the writing itself is at a level that I don't approach. And in many cases, these were written by kids in their late teen or early 20s with not much more education than a high school diploma.
 
2013-02-17 12:36:35 PM  
You think that took a long time, wait until they cut out Saturday deliveries.
 
2013-02-17 12:45:43 PM  

ChrisDe: Left-Handed Spatula: That is incredible handwriting for a 13-year-old boy. Most adults I know can't write that well.

Have you ever seen some of the letters home from the WWII era? Not only is much of the penmanship impeccable, the writing itself is at a level that I don't approach. And in many cases, these were written by kids in their late teen or early 20s with not much more education than a high school diploma.


Yep, penmenship was something much more stressed back in those days. I was referring to people nowadays; adults 50ish and above seem to continue to use legible, aesthetic cursive, whereas people below that age, who have been using computers to type almost everything for a larger percentage of their lives, seem to prefer printed writing which is more likely to be illegible.
 
2013-02-17 12:49:37 PM  

Left-Handed Spatula: ChrisDe: Left-Handed Spatula: That is incredible handwriting for a 13-year-old boy. Most adults I know can't write that well.

Have you ever seen some of the letters home from the WWII era? Not only is much of the penmanship impeccable, the writing itself is at a level that I don't approach. And in many cases, these were written by kids in their late teen or early 20s with not much more education than a high school diploma.

Yep, penmenship was something much more stressed back in those days. I was referring to people nowadays; adults 50ish and above seem to continue to use legible, aesthetic cursive, whereas people below that age, who have been using computers to type almost everything for a larger percentage of their lives, seem to prefer printed writing which is more likely to be illegible.


My handwriting used to be decent, but after spending the last 20 or so years using a keyboard, it has become horrendous.  I used to rarely misspell words, but whenever I pick up a pen, I realize how dependent I have become on the squiggly red line.
 
2013-02-17 12:55:25 PM  
And I thought it was bad when I received a Christmas card in August last year.

/Is there a time warp in a USPS sorting facility in Oklahoma?
 
2013-02-17 01:14:09 PM  
This story certainly gives me hope...last year, I mailed a postcard from NM that never reached its intended recipient.
 
2013-02-17 01:31:07 PM  
Having worked briefly as a letter carrier for the Canadian post office many years ago, I know exactly how these happen. One time I was tasked with moving a pile of supposedly empty mail sacks. So I'd pick them up about 20 at a time. I noticed a small bulge in a bag and found that it contained a parcel. Had it been in the middle of one of those stacks of 20 bags, I'd never have noticed the parcel. I gave it to my supervisor, who just shrugged. Must happen all the time. On another occasion, I was filling in for a letter carrier and noticed a couple of postcards had become wedged in a little nook behind the cubby holes used to sort the mail. The best example, though, happened when another letter carrier was training me to sort the mail. I had a question but he didn't answer. So I turned to him and saw that he was engrossed in a Playboy that he had slipped out of its paper sleeve. About three weeks later, I filled in for him on that route and the Playboy was still on his desk.
 
2013-02-17 02:22:18 PM  

SBinRR: Left-Handed Spatula: ChrisDe: Left-Handed Spatula: That is incredible handwriting for a 13-year-old boy. Most adults I know can't write that well.

Have you ever seen some of the letters home from the WWII era? Not only is much of the penmanship impeccable, the writing itself is at a level that I don't approach. And in many cases, these were written by kids in their late teen or early 20s with not much more education than a high school diploma.

Yep, penmenship was something much more stressed back in those days. I was referring to people nowadays; adults 50ish and above seem to continue to use legible, aesthetic cursive, whereas people below that age, who have been using computers to type almost everything for a larger percentage of their lives, seem to prefer printed writing which is more likely to be illegible.

My handwriting used to be decent, but after spending the last 20 or so years using a keyboard, it has become horrendous.  I used to rarely misspell words, but whenever I pick up a pen, I realize how dependent I have become on the squiggly red line.


Even in elementary school when I was learning to write amongst the rest of my class we could tell that handwriting sure wasn't going to be my cup of tea. I have some truly horrific chicken scratch.
 
2013-02-17 03:02:48 PM  
Either that or it got misdelivered, was held-onto for 45 years, and then someone finally re-found it and dropped it back into the mail.
 
2013-02-17 03:19:56 PM  
I'm guessing penmanship was more important back then, assuming that cheap disposable writing implements weren't available pretty much everywhere like they are now. Or if they were, in 1967, teachers probably were still teaching kids not to waste ink.

I can remember in middle school that some of the girls I knew seemed to have beautiful cursive handwriting. Mine was... well, more legible than a doctor's. I had never really practiced or used much of a reference after they taught us cursive in 3rd grade. Even though I used a style similar to what appears on the postcard from TFA, mine wasn't so consistent from word to word. A few years ago I was rummaging around in my parents' attic and found an old letter I'd written them from camp when I was 12. And I thought it wasn't so great as an adult...

It makes me wonder about kids nowadays, since computers are used so much more often than the written word. I've already met one highschool graduate who didn't know how to address a letter, and heard people at work talking about younger customers who didn't understand the term "self-addressed stamped envelope," but so far I haven't seen much bad handwriting.
 
2013-02-17 03:41:38 PM  
www.bestonlinecolleges.com
Wait, what?
 
2013-02-17 06:23:28 PM  
{/begin CSB}

In my apartment in 2006 I started getting a bunch of postcards, a small pack of photos, a couple of letters, all delivered to the same person over the course of a week. I knew who the previous occupant was (who had let me see the place before I rented), and I happen to have known the occupant before him (coincidentally a colleague at work). Very odd, since this person was neither of these two.

Then I noticed the postmarks are all from the late 1990s.

One of the people on a return address was listed (in Alaska, I think) and I actually called her, asking her if she knew how to find the original recipient. She got back to me with the address of the former occupant of my apartment.

Turned out that a package recently sent through the mail had gotten destroyed, but everything in it that had an address seems to have made its way back into the mail, to my address.

{/end CSB}
 
2013-02-17 06:26:58 PM  
Oh, yeah, I sent her the stuff.
 
2013-02-17 07:38:52 PM  

Bith Set Me Up: [images.wikia.com image 850x459]

The mailman in question?

/Realized the other day that this Western Union guy was also the "Ya jackass!" guy from "Happy Gilmore".


Joe Flaherty. I was going to post that he is a famous Canadian actor but he's actually American.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Flaherty
 
2013-02-17 07:53:59 PM  
Joe Flaherty telling the potato joke.
 
2013-02-17 09:10:43 PM  
There was a similar one of these in the news about three months ago, except the letter was considerably older and the people who it was addressed to had since died...but the recipient passed it on to surviving relatives.

While interesting, their is really nothing strange about it. Postal Sorting Facilities use huge machinery and occasionally something gets down behind or under where it cannot be reached. Years or decades later when machinery is replaced or the facility is closed, it is found and delivered..... if it is still in decent enough condition.

Also, very rarely you see something like a postal worker who had either stolen or failed to deliver mail for some reason...I remember years back literally sacks and sacks of mail was found, undelivered, in the attic of a former postman who had passed away. He was either too slow or too lazy to deliver it when he was supposed to, so he had stashed it away in his attic a little at a time over his years of employment..
 
2013-02-18 05:38:55 AM  

Left-Handed Spatula: ChrisDe: Left-Handed Spatula: That is incredible handwriting for a 13-year-old boy. Most adults I know can't write that well.

Have you ever seen some of the letters home from the WWII era? Not only is much of the penmanship impeccable, the writing itself is at a level that I don't approach. And in many cases, these were written by kids in their late teen or early 20s with not much more education than a high school diploma.

Yep, penmenship was something much more stressed back in those days. I was referring to people nowadays; adults 50ish and above seem to continue to use legible, aesthetic cursive, whereas people below that age, who have been using computers to type almost everything for a larger percentage of their lives, seem to prefer printed writing which is more likely to be illegible.


Seriously, I don't consider cursive to be half as legible as printed. Not just mine either. Cursive uses too many pointless loops and takes up more space, where printed writing is faster, smaller and more efficient.
 
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