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(USGS)   Pffft. You call those meteorite strikes? How about this one from 35 million years ago in the former Native lands, now called the U.S.A   (usgs.gov) divider line 74
    More: Interesting, homelands, brackish water, ocean water, Texaco, Chesapeake Bay, U.S. Geological Survey  
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14521 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 8:47 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-17 07:25:28 AM
Hits east of Virginia and the debris field stretches to Texas?

That would be one hell of a last show.
 
2013-02-17 07:40:14 AM
Interestingly enough, swarms of meteors strike about every 35 million years, as the solar system leaves the galactic plane which provides protection.

We have been moving out of the plane for some time now.
Sleep well. Chelyabinsk is just the beginning.

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2009/05/cataclysmic-orb.html
 
2013-02-17 08:50:03 AM
Locusts.

I ordered swarms of LOCUSTS goddammit!
 
2013-02-17 08:51:19 AM
Why didn't NASA know about this one? What's to stop a larger one from striking the earth and wiping us out like the Yucatan meteor which wiped out the dinosaurs?

That was rhetorical. NASA can't do shiat to save us.
 
2013-02-17 08:54:31 AM
Apparently, the debris field now includes the USGS servers...
 
2013-02-17 08:59:14 AM
"Scientists" and their old earth baloney. They are just trying to distract us from the fact that God has revealed Himself and He has sent a warning.
 
2013-02-17 09:02:55 AM
Pretty sure it wasn't Native lands back then, either....
 
2013-02-17 09:05:17 AM
Meteorite strikes? Is this proper terminology? I thought a meteor didn't become a meteorite until after it lands.
 
2013-02-17 09:07:19 AM

frankmigacz: Pretty sure it wasn't Native lands back then, either....


Thank you for this. The headline gives me anger.
 
2013-02-17 09:09:51 AM
I wonder how the conservatards would try to twist history to show Obama did it while at the same time trying to show how incompetent he is.
 
2013-02-17 09:09:57 AM
The math doesn't add up. How could something hit the earth 35 million years ago when the earth is only 6000 years old?
 
2013-02-17 09:15:34 AM
By Natives are you referring dinosaurs?
 
2013-02-17 09:17:52 AM
Your comments are Delmarvalous!
 
2013-02-17 09:18:27 AM

spacemanjones: The math doesn't add up. How could something hit the earth 35 million years ago when the earth is only 6000 years old?


Native land mythology
 
2013-02-17 09:22:31 AM

poe_zlaw: I wonder how the conservatards would try to twist history to show Obama did it while at the same time trying to show how incompetent he is.


Well, he did nothing to prevent it.

/that's a fact, Jack
 
2013-02-17 09:31:28 AM

cretinbob: Interestingly enough, swarms of meteors strike about every 35 million years, as the solar system leaves the galactic plane which provides protection.

We have been moving out of the plane for some time now.
Sleep well. Chelyabinsk is just the beginning.

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2009/05/cataclysmic-orb.html


thank you for sharing that link, made for an interesting read this morning :)
 
2013-02-17 09:34:04 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Why didn't NASA know about this one? What's to stop a larger one from striking the earth and wiping us out like the Yucatan meteor which wiped out the dinosaurs?

That was rhetorical. NASA can't do shiat to save us.


Yeah.  Media and government controllers would do well to just ignore the big one and treat everyone to 'situation normal' right to the very end, by pretending the big one is no big deal and not worth sensationalizing.

Meanwhile, the neo-Ark was sent out months (or even years)(or decades) ago.
 
2013-02-17 09:42:28 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: That was rhetorical. NASA can't do shiat to save us.


If it's detected early enough, they actually could do quite a bit. A small amount of force, applied over a long period of time, can do amazing things. That's why people are seriously examining such crazy-sounding plans as covering one side of an asteroid with white paint. The difference in albedo means one side is reflecting more solar radiation than the other- which provides a small amount of thrust. That would work, although there would be challenges in making it precise enough to guarantee that we don't steer it into our planet.

The biggest challenge isn't "how do we deflect an object", but more "how do we  detectan object". They're small and dim, and detection requires us to keep a close lookout, and that costs money.

cretinbob: Interestingly enough, swarms of meteors strike about every 35 million years, as the solar system leaves the galactic plane which provides protection.

We have been moving out of the plane for some time now.
Sleep well. Chelyabinsk is just the beginning.

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2009/05/cataclysmic-orb.html


Okay, first off, you have that backwards- the claim is that moving  into the plane triggers mass extinctions because gravitational tides disrupt the Oort cloud.  It's also bullshiat.
 
2013-02-17 09:42:31 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Why didn't NASA know about this one? What's to stop a larger one from striking the earth and wiping us out like the Yucatan meteor which wiped out the dinosaurs?

That was rhetorical. NASA can't do shiat to save us.


Yeah, they retired the shuttle, making us defenseless against giant rocks far outside of Earth's gravity well. I suggest we continue to build our debris field to deflect giant meteors until we have a new long range manned launch vehicle online capable of landing on meteors and asteroids on several days' notice to vaporize them. Or we could simply reprogram our ICBMs to be unmanned interplanetary intercept vehicles. I wish we had more people at NASA who can think outside the box.

/this is what people I talk with every day actually believe
 
2013-02-17 09:43:05 AM

frankmigacz: Pretty sure it wasn't Native lands back then, either....


I can't find who that crank is, but there's been some fool the last few years claiming humanity originates from North America (like the horse).
 
2013-02-17 09:43:07 AM

badhatharry: By Natives are you referring dinosaurs?


That was the asteroid that created the Chicxulub crater 66 million years ago.

Incidentally before everyone gets over excited & decides to spend billions on defence systems. Remember that no one has been killed by meteors in known memory.
 
2013-02-17 09:48:15 AM
Virginia:
 i277.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-17 09:49:42 AM
Chesapeake Bay...bah...

I prefer the Manson Crater  http://www.igsb.uiowa.edu/browse/manson99/manson.htm

Largest, best preserved impact crater on land in the US.
 
2013-02-17 09:51:35 AM
Lavos, eh?
 
2013-02-17 09:54:32 AM
jamspoon: 
Incidentally before everyone gets over excited & decides to spend billions on defence systems. Remember that no one has been killed by meteors in known memory.

It seems someone remembers:
http://delong.typepad.com/sdj/2008/06/reported-deaths.html
 
2013-02-17 09:56:19 AM
I ordered Nihilists, not Meteorites

Tomorrow ve come and ve cut off your JOHNSON
 
2013-02-17 10:03:09 AM
i47.tinypic.com
 
2013-02-17 10:21:04 AM
Too bad it didn't hit further up the coast, maybe Jersey, put the whole area under water and kill whatever invertebrates that devolved into J Woww and Snooki.
 
2013-02-17 10:24:09 AM
BTW, in a vacuum, you get no overpressure wave with an explosion.
Nukes, as depicted in film and fantasy will not move an asteroid.
All you get is Newton's Second, equal and opposite,and there is not that much mass.

All the nice "boom" is air.
 
2013-02-17 10:26:27 AM

badhatharry: By Natives are you referring dinosaurs?


By dinosaurs are you referring to Eocene mammals?   ;^)

/ couldn't resist
 
2013-02-17 10:35:59 AM
So American Indians have been around for 35 million years and still failed to develop a written language, the wheel, effective metallurgy, etc...?
 
2013-02-17 10:41:21 AM
Definitive evidence of the crater came in the early 1990s with the release of marine seismic data (a kind of large-scale sonogram) from Texaco and Exxon that provided imagery of the 56-mile complex crater.

Whoa.  Something not evil and actually advancing science.
 
2013-02-17 10:41:24 AM
Manicougan!
 
2013-02-17 10:43:04 AM

cretinbob: Interestingly enough, swarms of meteors strike about every 35 million years, as the solar system leaves the galactic plane which provides protection.

We have been moving out of the plane for some time now.
Sleep well. Chelyabinsk is just the beginning.

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2009/05/cataclysmic-orb.html


OK article. Though badly written, it did bring out several points.

That regular movement around the galaxy may also have an impact on global climate change, as the Sun and Earth plow through various dense dust/gas fields at different points in the orbit. Can cause both cooling (dust between Earth and Sun) and warming (in-fall of dust to the sun causes heating).
 
2013-02-17 10:44:12 AM

Ginnungagap42: badhatharry: By Natives are you referring dinosaurs?

By dinosaurs are you referring to Eocene mammals?   ;^)

/ couldn't resist


Whatever, dinosaurs were one of the previous former residents.
 
2013-02-17 10:44:42 AM

phrawgh: "Scientists" and their old earth baloney. They are just trying to distract us from the fact that God has revealed Himself and He has sent a warning.


L@@K AT ME, L@@K AT ME, I'M AN ATHEIST!!!!
 
2013-02-17 10:45:54 AM
The resulting 56-mile diameter complex crater has the shape of an inverted sombrero

I wonder if that's a technical term?
 
2013-02-17 10:46:31 AM

spacemanjones: The math doesn't add up. How could something hit the earth 35 million years ago when the earth is only 6000 years old?


L@@K AT ME, L@@K AT ME, I'M AN ATHEIST!!!!

It's early, I still need coffee, and you are being retarded.
 
2013-02-17 10:47:13 AM

poe_zlaw: I wonder how the conservatards would try to twist history to show Obama did it while at the same time trying to show how incompetent he is.


It's early, I still need coffee, and you are being retarded.  Take it to the Politics tab.
 
2013-02-17 10:51:52 AM

t3knomanser: AverageAmericanGuy: That was rhetorical. NASA can't do shiat to save us.

If it's detected early enough, they actually could do quite a bit. A small amount of force, applied over a long period of time, can do amazing things. That's why people are seriously examining such crazy-sounding plans as covering one side of an asteroid with white paint. The difference in albedo means one side is reflecting more solar radiation than the other- which provides a small amount of thrust. That would work, although there would be challenges in making it precise enough to guarantee that we don't steer it into our planet.

The biggest challenge isn't "how do we deflect an object", but more "how do we  detectan object". They're small and dim, and detection requires us to keep a close lookout, and that costs money.

cretinbob: Interestingly enough, swarms of meteors strike about every 35 million years, as the solar system leaves the galactic plane which provides protection.

We have been moving out of the plane for some time now.
Sleep well. Chelyabinsk is just the beginning.

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2009/05/cataclysmic-orb.html

Okay, first off, you have that backwards- the claim is that moving  into the plane triggers mass extinctions because gravitational tides disrupt the Oort cloud.  It's also bullshiat.


Yep. Keep the huddled masses complacent.
 
2013-02-17 10:56:25 AM

snocone: BTW, in a vacuum, you get no overpressure wave with an explosion.
Nukes, as depicted in film and fantasy will not move an asteroid.
All you get is Newton's Second, equal and opposite,and there is not that much mass.

All the nice "boom" is air.


Nukes would really be less effective than a humongous rail gun firing one pound metal slugs at 90% of light speed.
 
2013-02-17 10:57:04 AM
www.nature.com
 
2013-02-17 10:57:44 AM

GilRuiz1: Definitive evidence of the crater came in the early 1990s with the release of marine seismic data (a kind of large-scale sonogram) from Texaco and Exxon that provided imagery of the 56-mile complex crater.

Whoa.  Something not evil and actually advancing science.


They actually spend a pile of money every year doing that.
 
2013-02-17 10:58:57 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Why didn't NASA know about this one? What's to stop a larger one from striking the earth and wiping us out like the Yucatan meteor which wiped out the dinosaurs?

That was rhetorical. NASA can't do shiat to save us.


NASA can do something, we're just too stupid and shortsighted to give them any funding to do so.
 
2013-02-17 11:05:30 AM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: snocone: BTW, in a vacuum, you get no overpressure wave with an explosion.
Nukes, as depicted in film and fantasy will not move an asteroid.
All you get is Newton's Second, equal and opposite,and there is not that much mass.

All the nice "boom" is air.

Nukes would really be less effective than a humongous rail gun firing one pound metal slugs at 90% of light speed.


So, who's orbit would you decay to fire enough mass to do some work?
Remember, Newton had 3.
 
2013-02-17 11:09:54 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Why didn't NASA know about this one? What's to stop a larger one from striking the earth and wiping us out like the Yucatan meteor which wiped out the dinosaurs?

That was rhetorical. NASA can't do shiat to save us.


You're right, what would be the point of saying anything if they knew a big nasty was hurtling its way to obliterate earth?  Probably wouldn't say anything for the same reason they kept the crew of the shuttle Columbia in the dark about the ship's heat shields letting them go out in a blaze of glory.
 
2013-02-17 11:10:52 AM

t3knomanser: AverageAmericanGuy: That was rhetorical. NASA can't do shiat to save us.

If it's detected early enough, they actually could do quite a bit. A small amount of force, applied over a long period of time, can do amazing things. That's why people are seriously examining such crazy-sounding plans as covering one side of an asteroid with white paint. The difference in albedo means one side is reflecting more solar radiation than the other- which provides a small amount of thrust. That would work, although there would be challenges in making it precise enough to guarantee that we don't steer it into our planet.


Maybe there's an alternative?

upload.wikimedia.org

One of the quirkiest, ballsiest but best SF movies I ever saw. The (brief) scene with the monster is awesome.

"ARRRRGH! Huge monster!"  "Quick! Blast it with the digging lasers!" BLAM BLAM BLAM SIZZLE....  "OK, STOP LOLLYGAGGING AROUND! GET BACK TO WORK; YOU'RE 2 MINUTES BEHIND SCHEDULE!"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gorath
 
2013-02-17 11:24:21 AM

Arkanaut: The resulting 56-mile diameter complex crater has the shape of an inverted sombrero

I wonder if that's a technical term?


Technical term for Inverted Sombrero is Vulva
 
2013-02-17 11:28:22 AM

Fark Rye For Many Whores: frankmigacz: Pretty sure it wasn't Native lands back then, either....

I can't find who that crank is, but there's been some fool the last few years claiming humanity originates from North America (like the horse).


E was evicted from serious anthropology/genetics blog few months ago
 
2013-02-17 11:30:21 AM

snocone: BTW, in a vacuum, you get no overpressure wave with an explosion.
Nukes, as depicted in film and fantasy will not move an asteroid.
All you get is Newton's Second, equal and opposite,and there is not that much mass.

All the nice "boom" is air.


I wonder if you could build a shaped-charged nuke?
 
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