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(The New York Times)   Times trend reporters discover hot new trend of Brooklyn creative class migrating to the suburbs of NYC and bringing along their foodie tastes, tattoo art and fringe culture to create "hipsturbia" (link foxed)   (nytimes.com) divider line 100
    More: Ironic  
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4274 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Feb 2013 at 7:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-16 08:58:02 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: But faced with overpaying for a Brooklyn home that would barely contain a life with two young sons, they decided to look northward. "When we checked towns out," Ms. Miziolek recalled, "I saw some moms out in Hastings with their kids with tattoos. A little glimmer of Williamsburg!"

If these retards had left Brooklyn in the last decade or so this wouldn't have been surprising. You can't claim open-mindedness when you live in a farking bubble.

bears tattoos with his sons' names, Denim and Bowie,

[img.photobucket.com image 500x346]


It gets worse...

FTA: He conducted a Google Maps street-view search of Westchester, and settled on Hastings for his family when he saw Subarus parked on the streets, not Lexus SUVs.

I am really hoping the article left out the parts where he did an extensive check of the area schools, transportation, taxes, distance to work... but I think I am overestimating their intellect on this one.
 
2013-02-16 08:58:18 PM  

ronaprhys: Solid State Vittles: Yes, darn having everything within walking distance, such a pain in the ass.

Yeah - walking distance.  Great excuse for overpaying like hell for a 400ft2apartment that you'll never own.  Whereas out here, away from The City, any idiot with a decent job can own an actual house, with a yard, that's 6 times as large.  And, oddly enough, pay maybe 1/4 of what you're paying for your shoebox. 

StreetlightInTheGhetto: All my hipster friends who live in NYC live in Queens or the Bronx.  For some odd reason, any description of the Brooklyn crowd always seemed to be Kids Having Fun With Mom and Dad's Money and/or Connections and hence embodying only the most f--king irritating things about "hipster" culture.

/shrug

Whatever.  Don't care.  I'm betting both of those crowds are pretentious assholes.


You can live in extreme rural Idaho for probably 1/8 less that what YOU are paying for your suburb house and it has way more open space. According to your logic, living in Idaho is way better?
 
pc
2013-02-16 08:58:18 PM  

Ryker's Peninsula: please log in?
featured partner?

What the hell is going on here anymore?


graphics8.nytimes.com
Quiz: Indie Rock Frontman Or Random Guy In Brooklyn?
 
2013-02-16 09:04:18 PM  

ronaprhys: Solid State Vittles: Yes, darn having everything within walking distance, such a pain in the ass.

Yeah - walking distance.  Great excuse for overpaying like hell for a 400ft2apartment that you'll never own.  Whereas out here, away from The City, any idiot with a decent job can own an actual house, with a yard, that's 6 times as large.  And, oddly enough, pay maybe 1/4 of what you're paying for your shoebox. 

StreetlightInTheGhetto: All my hipster friends who live in NYC live in Queens or the Bronx.  For some odd reason, any description of the Brooklyn crowd always seemed to be Kids Having Fun With Mom and Dad's Money and/or Connections and hence embodying only the most f--king irritating things about "hipster" culture.

/shrug

Whatever.  Don't care.  I'm betting both of those crowds are pretentious assholes.


Well, the important part is that you found a way to feel superior to strangers on the internet.....
 
2013-02-16 09:04:24 PM  
Can't that jerkwad Bloombooger just outlaw moving or something?
 
2013-02-16 09:04:56 PM  
Beacon, NY -- lots of new, young people with children, more places to eat and the menu items are tasty, in the summer, outside arty things, for free. and they pay top dollar for old clothes, I'm making a fortune running to church thrift stores and then back to the local flea market.
 
2013-02-16 09:05:10 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: But faced with overpaying for a Brooklyn home that would barely contain a life with two young sons, they decided to look northward. "When we checked towns out," Ms. Miziolek recalled, "I saw some moms out in Hastings with their kids with tattoos. A little glimmer of Williamsburg!"

If these retards had left Brooklyn in the last decade or so this wouldn't have been surprising. You can't claim open-mindedness when you live in a farking bubble.

bears tattoos with his sons' names, Denim and Bowie,

[img.photobucket.com image 500x346]


to make you feel better.....from another house hunting article in the NYTimes, regarding Bushwick.

graphics8.nytimes.com
 
2013-02-16 09:06:03 PM  
They should  just move to Long Island where the power grid gets knocked out every time there is a slight breeze...
 
2013-02-16 09:10:23 PM  
Since when is 1200 square feet small?
 
2013-02-16 09:17:45 PM  

dumbobruni: to make you feel better.....from another house hunting article in the NYTimes, regarding Bushwick.


Oh good lord.

I'm starting to feel like Hank Hill, and i'm only 33
 
2013-02-16 09:19:14 PM  
Since when is 1200 square feet small?
My garage is 22' by 32' . Where do you kep all your stuff?
 
2013-02-16 09:29:30 PM  
I live I one of the towns mentioned in the article and here's why I love it here:

1. The town is a living museum of American aritchture. From 19th century Victorians to craftsmen colonials, it runs the gambit of almost every period of American architectural history. Isn't a cookie cutter suburb - every house looks different from the next. And by and large, the town still looks like it did 100 years ago. This is probably the biggest factor in me never wanting to leave here. There's an insane amount of charm living in these towns. My mortgage on my 1890's Victorian would be the same as rent for a one bedroom apartment in the West Village.

2. I don't need to get in a car and get on a highway and go to a mall. I can walk, or take a short drive in town, to restaurants that can rival those in the city, coffee shops, bookstores, art theaters where I can go in and not understand art, to indie flik theaters to cool wine stores to whatever. I can keep doing a lot of the stuff that makes living in city fun- albeit on a smaller scale. Small town USA is alive and thriving here - with not a Walmart or a chain restaurant anywhere in town.

3. Because tons of people move out here from the city, talking with your neighbors is a lot more fun than in other towns - and you actually SEE your neighbors here. People are educated, fun, and progressive. You meet lots of people that share similar intrists and who are fun to hang around with. My town has a ton of writers that work in the city, so you just dont feel like your trapped out in some midwestern, cookie cutter suburbia (no disrespect. Well, a little) And most are young parents and professionals, not dirty hipsters. My town specifically is about 60% white, so I feel like your kids don't grow up too sheltered either. Town runs the gambit from ultra wealthy to middle class to poor.

4. I have a backyard, which I just took my dog out to poop in. He didn't go. When it gets warmer, I can't wait to sit out on my porch.

5. Manhattan is just a short train ride away, though I really don't miss it at all.


I know, I know, I sound fat.
 
2013-02-16 09:34:44 PM  

mvl9591: Since when is 1200 square feet small?
My garage is 22' by 32' . Where do you kep all your stuff?


Why do you need that much stuff?  People tend to get as much stuff as their space will hold, and don't use most of it anyway.
 
2013-02-16 09:36:58 PM  
I've been reading this article and thread while eating a vegan meatball sub at a bar on Alberta in NE Portland, so I probably shouldn't judge.
 
2013-02-16 10:34:57 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: But faced with overpaying for a Brooklyn home that would barely contain a life with two young sons, they decided to look northward. "When we checked towns out," Ms. Miziolek recalled, "I saw some moms out in Hastings with their kids with tattoos. A little glimmer of Williamsburg!"

If these retards had left Brooklyn in the last decade or so this wouldn't have been surprising. You can't claim open-mindedness when you live in a farking bubble.

bears tattoos with his sons' names, Denim and Bowie,

[img.photobucket.com image 500x346]


Moms with tattoos as the latest thing?

Then any red state east of the Front Range is the new Hipster Mecca.
 
2013-02-16 10:40:09 PM  
This thread is over!
 
2013-02-16 10:46:25 PM  
I lived in the suburbs before it was cool.
 
2013-02-16 10:49:59 PM  

Yamaneko2: HotWingConspiracy: But faced with overpaying for a Brooklyn home that would barely contain a life with two young sons, they decided to look northward. "When we checked towns out," Ms. Miziolek recalled, "I saw some moms out in Hastings with their kids with tattoos. A little glimmer of Williamsburg!"

If these retards had left Brooklyn in the last decade or so this wouldn't have been surprising. You can't claim open-mindedness when you live in a farking bubble.

bears tattoos with his sons' names, Denim and Bowie,

[img.photobucket.com image 500x346]

Moms with tattoos as the latest thing?

Then any red state east of the Front Range is the new Hipster Mecca.


No, not the tattoos, he's pointing out that the sons names are "Denim", a clothing material, and "Bowie", a type of knife; which is also the name of a famous singer, but people (like these Hipsters) forget it's his last name and that his first name is "David". Well, I shouldn't be saying much, I consider myself a Goth and if I do have kids and go crazy like the hipster parents do; get ready for my two boys "Damien" and "Odin" and daughter "Lydia"! :-)
 
2013-02-16 11:20:22 PM  

mvl9591: Since when is 1200 square feet small?
My garage is 22' by 32' . Where do you kep all your stuff?


I don't have much stuff, I guess. Mostly it's books, and I put bookshelves around all the walls of the main rooms.

I live in an old neighborhood, it's free standing homes but most of them are probably 1000 square feet or so.  If anyone has a garage it's a separate building from the house, and fits one car.  They're all built somewhere around 1910 to 1930.

"Larger" houses would be around 2000 sq. ft, maybe? Two stories rather than one. But yeah it's normal families living in them, with kids.
 
2013-02-16 11:21:39 PM  

Yamaneko2: Moms with tattoos as the latest thing?

Then any red state east of the Front Range is the new Hipster Mecca.


Ah but it has to be the "right" kind of tattoos, surely.

/no tattoos here, but no doubt if I got one it'd be "wrong"
 
2013-02-16 11:29:57 PM  

JohnnyRebel88: Ryker's Peninsula: please log in?
featured partner?

What the hell is going on here anymore?

I remember when there was a boobies tag.  Ahh...  The good ole' days.


For real.
Everyone told me I'd get over losing the "Music" tab too.
 
2013-02-17 12:30:54 AM  

Ryker's Peninsula: JohnnyRebel88: Ryker's Peninsula: please log in?
featured partner?

What the hell is going on here anymore?

I remember when there was a boobies tag.  Ahh...  The good ole' days.

For real.
Everyone told me I'd get over losing the "Music" tab too.


Did you?
 
2013-02-17 01:04:22 AM  

organizmx: I live I one of the towns mentioned in the article and here's why I love it here:

1. The town is a living museum of American aritchture. From 19th century Victorians to craftsmen colonials, it runs the gambit of almost every period of American architectural history. Isn't a cookie cutter suburb - every house looks different from the next. And by and large, the town still looks like it did 100 years ago. This is probably the biggest factor in me never wanting to leave here. There's an insane amount of charm living in these towns. My mortgage on my 1890's Victorian would be the same as rent for a one bedroom apartment in the West Village.

2. I don't need to get in a car and get on a highway and go to a mall. I can walk, or take a short drive in town, to restaurants that can rival those in the city, coffee shops, bookstores, art theaters where I can go in and not understand art, to indie flik theaters to cool wine stores to whatever. I can keep doing a lot of the stuff that makes living in city fun- albeit on a smaller scale. Small town USA is alive and thriving here - with not a Walmart or a chain restaurant anywhere in town.

3. Because tons of people move out here from the city, talking with your neighbors is a lot more fun than in other towns - and you actually SEE your neighbors here. People are educated, fun, and progressive. You meet lots of people that share similar intrists and who are fun to hang around with. My town has a ton of writers that work in the city, so you just dont feel like your trapped out in some midwestern, cookie cutter suburbia (no disrespect. Well, a little) And most are young parents and professionals, not dirty hipsters. My town specifically is about 60% white, so I feel like your kids don't grow up too sheltered either. Town runs the gambit from ultra wealthy to middle class to poor.

4. I have a backyard, which I just took my dog out to poop in. He didn't go. When it gets warmer, I can't wait to sit out on my porch.

5. Manhattan is j ...


My brother and his wife are looking to move and Montclair is at the top of the list. They like it better than the Westchester towns that are mentioned in the article for precisely the same reason that a farker who posted the demographics of Hastings-on-the-Hudson wanted to prove. Very little diversity in those towns and in Bronxville and Scarsdale as well where they were looking as well. While Montclair seems to have a much more diverse population. My SIL is Filipino so having a decent sized Asian population is an important feature.
 
2013-02-17 01:29:21 AM  
DarkSoulNoHope:  he's pointing out that the sons names are "Denim", a clothing material, and "Bowie", a type of knife; which is also the name of a famous singer, but people (like these Hipsters) forget it's his last name and that his first name is "David". Well, I shouldn't be saying much, I consider myself a Goth and if I do have kids and go crazy like the hipster parents do; get ready for my two boys "Damien" and "Odin" and daughter "Lydia"! :-)

I'm a dieselpunk. I'm naming my first three kids Gabardine, Victrola and Studebaker.
 
2013-02-17 01:47:22 AM  
Good Riddance is right!

I've been living in Brooklyn well over 30 years since way before it developed the recent reputation it has and I'll probably still be living here when I die.  I like it here.

The more of these pretentious, self centered, asshole types move out, the better.  The article was so dripping with pretension that hopefully it will make them realize that it's okay to leave.

Good luck Montclair, Hastings, et al.  You're in for a treat.
 
2013-02-17 01:51:10 AM  
The problem was (and is) that the suburbs are very, very sensitive to the overall economy and to numerous bubbles.

We lost our house in 2008 in Westchester County when the financial crisis / real estate bubble popped.   Dad's business had been trashed for a year before, and thanks to (insert expensive suburb between Pleasantville and Katonah)'s wildly outrageous property taxes (to the tune of 30k a year), everything crumbled.

I've seen Tarrytown stumble and fail when GM pulled its plant out. Not that things can bounce back, clearly Tarrytown has. However, I would impress upon everyone that these towns are extremely sensitive to economic fluctuation. The polish and shine on Tarrytown, Irving-on-Hudson, etc. is quite nice; having lived through these towns' low-points from 1974 to 2008, I can tell you that the nice times in surburbia are fleeting. The shine seems to evaporate in a matter of years.

Not to be a downer, and of course, this is my experience and perception. Your mileage may vary.
 
2013-02-17 02:02:51 AM  

susler: Good Riddance is right!

I've been living in Brooklyn well over 30 years since way before it developed the recent reputation it has and I'll probably still be living here when I die.  I like it here.

The more of these pretentious, self centered, asshole types move out, the better.  The article was so dripping with pretension that hopefully it will make them realize that it's okay to leave.

Good luck Montclair, Hastings, et al.  You're in for a treat.


They've gone farther south than that in Jersey. :( Asbury Park, the city just to the north of my town has had a hipster explosion in recent years.  The area north of Main Street to just South of Grand Ave between Bangs and Lake Ave (mostly on Cookman Ave) has turned into a centralized hipster hub of pretentiousness.
 
2013-02-17 02:04:28 AM  

i upped my meds-up yours: DarkSoulNoHope:  he's pointing out that the sons names are "Denim", a clothing material, and "Bowie", a type of knife; which is also the name of a famous singer, but people (like these Hipsters) forget it's his last name and that his first name is "David". Well, I shouldn't be saying much, I consider myself a Goth and if I do have kids and go crazy like the hipster parents do; get ready for my two boys "Damien" and "Odin" and daughter "Lydia"! :-)

I'm a dieselpunk. I'm naming my first three kids Gabardine, Victrola and Studebaker.


Would a steampunker as opposed to a dieselpunk name their kids slightly differently?
 
2013-02-17 02:23:27 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: i upped my meds-up yours: DarkSoulNoHope:  he's pointing out that the sons names are "Denim", a clothing material, and "Bowie", a type of knife; which is also the name of a famous singer, but people (like these Hipsters) forget it's his last name and that his first name is "David". Well, I shouldn't be saying much, I consider myself a Goth and if I do have kids and go crazy like the hipster parents do; get ready for my two boys "Damien" and "Odin" and daughter "Lydia"! :-)

I'm a dieselpunk. I'm naming my first three kids Gabardine, Victrola and Studebaker.

Would a steampunker as opposed to a dieselpunk name their kids slightly differently?


No, but Studebaker would be a wagon and not a car.
 
2013-02-17 06:43:43 AM  
Again with the hipsters? This is why we can't have nice things, Fark...

Modmins? Consider redlighting NYT articles please? If we keep driving traffic to them, there's even le$$ of a change this'll $top.
 
kth
2013-02-17 09:20:05 AM  
Suburbs?  pfft.

We moved to a rural community last year, the suburbs are so played out.


/or in other words, my husband got his dream job 1 1/2 hours outside of the city we lived in, and so we moved to some land in the middle, to lessen my commute.
 
2013-02-17 09:45:53 AM  

Znuh: The problem was (and is) that the suburbs are very, very sensitive to the overall economy and to numerous bubbles.

We lost our house in 2008 in Westchester County when the financial crisis / real estate bubble popped.   Dad's business had been trashed for a year before, and thanks to (insert expensive suburb between Pleasantville and Katonah)'s wildly outrageous property taxes (to the tune of 30k a year), everything crumbled.

I've seen Tarrytown stumble and fail when GM pulled its plant out. Not that things can bounce back, clearly Tarrytown has. However, I would impress upon everyone that these towns are extremely sensitive to economic fluctuation. The polish and shine on Tarrytown, Irving-on-Hudson, etc. is quite nice; having lived through these towns' low-points from 1974 to 2008, I can tell you that the nice times in surburbia are fleeting. The shine seems to evaporate in a matter of years.

Not to be a downer, and of course, this is my experience and perception. Your mileage may vary.


==================

I've had similar experiences.  I grew up on Bergen County when it was mostly all shiny.   After the oil crisis of 1979, and Ford's shut down of their assembly plant in Mahwah(the largest auto assembly plant in the world when it was built) it was like someone hit the off switch.  I can still remember going to Hackensack with my parents and seeing the line in front of the unemployment office which stretched for two blocks down the street.  I can remember how quickly the town where we lived became run down and shabby looking.   Eventually there was a sort of recovery.  The northern part of the county became very "upscale" while the southern part of the county sank even lower.   The place divided into winners and losers with not much in between.  .
 
2013-02-17 10:13:35 AM  

susler: Good Riddance is right!

I've been living in Brooklyn well over 30 years since way before it developed the recent reputation it has and I'll probably still be living here when I die.  I like it here.

The more of these pretentious, self centered, asshole types move out, the better.  The article was so dripping with pretension that hopefully it will make them realize that it's okay to leave.

Good luck Montclair, Hastings, et al.  You're in for a treat.


You know whats even more pretentious than the D-Bags in this article?  The D-Bags who think that because they live somewhere they are entitled to a stasis bubble to ensure that nothing ever changes in their neighborhood.
 
2013-02-17 10:28:01 AM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: Yeah, I don't "get" the whole concept of using your apartment to sleep in and going and chilling at cool places that people in the 'burbs watch on TV, either. Let's you and me drive 20 minutes to a strip mall and get some Dominoes pizza or splurge and get some Olive Garden at the mall 30 minutes from here.


Because there are no mom and pop stores, bars, or other places to hang out in the 'burbs or rural areas?  Are you that damned stupid?

xsarien: So let's go over again why The Suburbs are so cheap compared to cities...

/ More people want to live in The City
// I grew up in the suburbs, doing my best to avoid inflicting that hell on any child I may have


I doubt more people want to live in the cities.  It's more supply and demand than anything, but thanks for showing that you can't think critically.

advres: How much does the average person that could afford to live in the city but doesn't spend on gas, car payment and insurance just to get to work?  Bet the difference between our mortgages aren't even close to that total allowing me to save 25% of my income for retirement.  Who's the dumbass now.? :/


Well, considering my insurance bill for two vehicles, a house, and everything else is less than half of what it was when we lived in NJ and our mortgage is significantly less than what we would've paid there (probably a third, if we wanted to have an equivalent amount of space), I'm thinking you failed math.  Even with two car payments, we wouldn't be close to average payments there.  And I can sit on my back porch and rarely even see people, find parking easily, etc.

Solid State Vittles: My yard is the Presidio and Golden Gate Park.  I have a 15 minute bus ride downtown to go to work.  I have everything I need right here.  It's not overpaying when you can afford it.

You're obvious proof that any idiot with a decent job can own a shiatty cookie cutter house in Minivanland, USA.  Don't be so bitter you can't hack city life.


City life is easy - it just sucks.  Oddly enough, I've got my own back yard and parks with actual trees and nature.  Not paved paths littered with trash.  I've been in the parks in that area.  Simply put, they aren't impressive.  Here I can easily go on multiple mile hikes and not actually see another person, but be surrounded by wildlife.  Deers, hawks, all sorts of other birds, and most of the other creatures one would expect in the woods.

Also, overpaying has nothing to do with one's ability to pay for it.  I could afford the city, I just don't see any reason to live like a rat in a maze.

lilplatinum: I love when people brag about how far their suburbia cookie cutter home has so much space.  Who gives a shiat.  Sure, my place in Brooklyn isn't a McMansion, but we have adequate space, a guest room, and a back yard to grill in.  What more does one need if one isn't a breeder?

Yeah, its pricier than some place in the sticks, thats the price you pay for convenience and not having to drive everywhere like a schmuck.


Who said I had to drive everywhere?  I've got several bars, shops, and restaurants within easy walking distance.  Within easy driving distance I've got every shop I could ever need for every day life.  We're not talking 30 minutes of driving, either.  Sub 5 minute drives.   Maybe you just don't understand that where I live is superior to the city in every way possible.

udhq: Well, the important part is that you found a way to feel superior to strangers on the internet.....


Welcome to Fark?
 
2013-02-17 10:35:44 AM  
Subby there are no suburbs in NYC. The suburbs are outside of NYC.
 
2013-02-17 10:37:55 AM  
FTFA: Brooklyn no longer feels as carefree as it did, said Ari Wallach, a futurism consultant,

Ummmm.....What the farking %$@& is a "futurism consultant".....

/I give up.
 
2013-02-17 12:02:08 PM  

ronaprhys: Who said I had to drive everywhere?  I've got several bars, shops, and restaurants within easy walking distance.  Within easy driving distance I've got every shop I could ever need for every day life.  We're not talking 30 minutes of driving, either.  Sub 5 minute drives.   Maybe you just don't understand that where I live is superior to the city in every way possible.


And I have exponentially more bars and shops and essentially manner of food within easy walking or at worst a relatively short train ride which means I don't have to worry about getting drunk and getting home while leaving my car there.   And I don't have to deal with farking nature and the myriad pests that come along with it.

Its fine if you can't hack city life, but thats about you and not the city.   I've lived in the greenest city in Northern Europe, Shanghai, Alaska, and myriad suburbs in 5 states - Brooklyn is hands down superior to any of these places.    Do I pay a premium for that?  Yup, that's generally how life works.. but, fark it, I have to work in the Financial District and it is less than 15 minutes door to door from where I live to there... I will take that to your farking deer running in front of vehicles and other natural pests.
 
2013-02-17 12:25:09 PM  

lilplatinum: And I have exponentially more bars and shops and essentially manner of food within easy walking or at worst a relatively short train ride which means I don't have to worry about getting drunk and getting home while leaving my car there.   And I don't have to deal with farking nature and the myriad pests that come along with it.


Wow - so are you attempting to imply that quantity makes up for quality?  If so, you're sorely mistaken.  I've got plenty of quality bars here.  Secondly, if I want to drink to get drunk, it's easy enough to have a ride home.  Or, cheaper still, just drink at home with friends over.  That way we can have high quality food (better than almost any restaurant out there), friends hanging out, and no worries whatsoever - all while saving money.And yes, the food is better than what you're getting.  I've eaten in many places in the city and they're not all that good - especially not at the costs you pay.

Its fine if you can't hack city life, but thats about you and not the city.   I've lived in the greenest city in Northern Europe, Shanghai, Alaska, and myriad suburbs in 5 states - Brooklyn is hands down superior to any of these places.    Do I pay a premium for that?  Yup, that's generally how life works.. but, fark it, I have to work in the Financial District and it is less than 15 minutes door to door from where I live to there... I will take that to your farking deer running in front of vehicles and other natural pests.

Again with the can't hack city life.  To say that is a singularly stupid.  Plain and simple.  City life, much like surburban life or rural life, is easy.  The question is which is preferable.  I've lived in all of the above and prefer the outskirts of medium-sized cities.  Everything I need is easily available, but I get plenty of space, pay less, and live healthier.  Secondly, my pests are bugs.  Yours are vagrants, druggies, and the like.  Trash everywhere, nasty smells, etc.  Being surrounded by people at all times, being unable to listen to natural sounds.  Sounds completely counter-intuitive to me.
 
2013-02-17 01:03:22 PM  
It's completely shocking to me that people have different comfort levels and preferences about where they like to live, and different needs!! D:


I love the city, but it has never dawned on me to think that anyone who didn't was stupid, unless they attacked the place; that's just annoying.  I think suburbs could, in general, benefit from much better planning (walkability would be key, and would foster the survival of thousands of small businesses), but if you choose to live there, i don't give a damn.  What's up with this country mouse/city mouse pissing contest?
 
2013-02-17 01:36:14 PM  

balisane: What's up with this country mouse/city mouse pissing contest?


I never understood it. I would enjoy the city life better for convenience, but understand the people's enjoyment of privacy and quietness.  Though I do love the hipster/anti-hipster pissing contests, those are the good ones! :)
 
2013-02-17 01:48:18 PM  
ronaprhys:

Wow - so are you attempting to imply that quantity makes up for quality?  If so, you're sorely mistaken.  I've got plenty of quality bars here.  Secondly, if I want to drink to get drunk, it's easy enough to have a ride home.  Or, cheaper still, just drink at home with friends over.  That way we can have high quality food (better than almost any restaurant out there), friends hanging out, and no worries whatsoever - all while saving money.And yes, the food is better than what you're getting.  I've eaten in many places in the city and they're not all that good - especially not at the costs you pay.

No I am saying variety and quality beats just quality.  I'm sure you have some decent local bar.  Here, however, you have countless options all across the spectrum.  Do I want to go to a dive bar, hear some live jazz at the bar, fancy cocktail bar, huge wine bar, brewpub, beer garden, whiskey bar, after hours bar... whatever I'm in the mood for.  Sure there are some dogs, but hell, part of the fun of finding new places is the risk that they will suck - oh well, mark that one off the list and go a block away to another one.

Same with restaraunts.  Any conceivable type of cuisine is readily available to me.  I don't even know what Khazakstani food is, but a quick google search has shown me I could find out in a handful of minutes.

As for your incredibly specious claim that your food scene is superior to the cities, that is absurd.  NYC is ranked as one of the top culinary cities in the world by anyone who knows fark all about food.  I guess the French are just too snobby to award your hidden gems with any michelin stars.   The food here runs the gamut too, high priced high end or low priced street food - and yes, there is a lot of garbage mixed in with the good stuff.  But people who live here can kind of figure out the difference fairly quick if they care to make an attempt.

I'm willing to believe your place has better than the normal Olive Garden/TGI Fridays fare, but to put it up against the big boys in terms of options and the quality of the top places in both things is just naive.


Again with the can't hack city life.  To say that is a singularly stupid.  Plain and simple.  City life, much like surburban life or rural life, is easy.  The question is which is preferable.  I've lived in all of the above and prefer the outskirts of medium-sized cities.  Everything I need is easily available, but I get plenty of space, pay less, and live healthier.  Secondly, my pests are bugs.  Yours are vagrants, druggies, and the like.  Trash everywhere, nasty smells, etc.  Being surrounded by people at all t ...

Healthier?  That doesn't make sense.  There is essentially nothing healthier about where you live unless you are breathing in heavy smog everyday or something.

Posts like this make it sound that everyone who lives in NYC is living in alphabet city circa 1987.   When you live in high population density you do have to deal with the fact that other human beings are around, but we are not wading knee deep through trash and stepping over junkies every few seconds.  Oh dear, an occasional mild annoyance asking you for change, whatever shall you do!   Being around humanity is not stressful enough to deter one from the benefits of living among them - and I say this as a misanthrope who generally despises humanity.

Nature, however, is just a constant annoyance.  There is a reason humanity has a general trend of destroying nature to erect cities - primarily because it is dirty, filled with annoyances, and generally useless.
 
2013-02-17 01:53:44 PM  

DarkSoulNoHope: balisane: What's up with this country mouse/city mouse pissing contest?

I never understood it. I would enjoy the city life better for convenience, but understand the people's enjoyment of privacy and quietness.  Though I do love the hipster/anti-hipster pissing contests, those are the good ones! :)


Heh. The only hipsters that genuinely irritate me are the trust-fund babies, and their attitudes would be unbearable no matter what kind of obnoxious shoes they were wearing. Otherwise, live and let live, man; most people grow out of the dumbass parts of their chosen subculture eventually. You don't exactly see me with goblets of fake blood on the windowsill any more.

God help us if some podunk historical burb gets a slow-pork restaurant or bike lanes or something. If the locals don't like it, too, it won't survive.
 
2013-02-17 03:12:24 PM  

balisane: DarkSoulNoHope: balisane: What's up with this country mouse/city mouse pissing contest?

I never understood it. I would enjoy the city life better for convenience, but understand the people's enjoyment of privacy and quietness.  Though I do love the hipster/anti-hipster pissing contests, those are the good ones! :)

Heh. The only hipsters that genuinely irritate me are the trust-fund babies, and their attitudes would be unbearable no matter what kind of obnoxious shoes they were wearing. Otherwise, live and let live, man; most people grow out of the dumbass parts of their chosen subculture eventually.


For me I guess it's both, more so the trust-fund babies (for the attitude and the fact that they're lifestyle is subsidized by their parents) than the regular hipsters, but both still annoy me enough. Pretty much for the fact that Hipsters steal from every prior subculture, which would be fine if they treated it like "found art", but instead they just pretend it's their own original creation and get snooty towards the practitioners of the subculture they stole from. Like when you visit a Hipster owned music store and I would be looking for Goth music, it won't be in a specific section for Goth music, instead it will be "Post Punk" (which was, in my opinion, a lazy term by a magazine writer in the 70s to describe bands that were formerly a punk band but started the Goth music style and subculture, when even Ian Curtis of Joy Division was giving himself the "Goth" label back then) for many Goth bands that were far beyond the early Post Punk leanings (such as Sisters of Mercy, Death in June, and a few others) or some worse, made up terms, such as "Post Industrial Noize", because the Hipsters seem to be either afraid or ashamed of the dark connotations the "Goth" label brings when they listen to Goth music. (also if you watch Portlandia, they weren't kidding [sadly] about the "bad customer service" jokes at some of these stores!) Plus the fact that something goes mainstream or has been mainstream that they listen to, they can't seem to admit to liking it, instead they claim they only are listening/enjoying something "ironically" when they get caught! (I am a Goth, I dress like one, play and listen to Goth music, and enjoy dark styled tv shows, movies, and books; but ask about what is one of my all time favorite bands? The first thing that would come come out of my mouth is Hall and Oates! I can openly admit that, CUZ I'M NOT ASHAMED OF IT! :-D ) Plus they can't even admit they're Hipsters, despite them all dressing and acting the exact same way!

You don't exactly see me with goblets of fake blood on the windowsill any more.

That was fake? Darn, now I have to find another suspect in the case of the missing neighbor. Come Scooby Doo! :-D

God help us if some podunk historical burb gets a slow-pork restaurant or bike lanes or something. If the locals don't like it, too, it won't survive.

Well, that's what this NY Times story is all about and we'll find out eventually. Though I myself don't like it from personal experience. For example, I live in the town next to Asbury Park which has turned into Monmouth County, NJ's Hipster Mecca, and so far the Hipster/Rockabilly types have taken over Asbury Lanes since 2003 (and of course wouldn't hire little old Goth DJ me to spin there; yes, I've tried!), Hipster patrons to the pinball arcade make claims to me (when I try to talk with them) they have always adored the "old style pinball" games more than the "new style pinball" at the Silverball Museum I play at (and have several High Scores btw! Just look for "DJ Argus" on the score sheets if you can make it there in AP. :-P ) but can't seem to describe to me what era of "old style" to the "new style" do they compare to even though there are machines in there from even the start of pinball in 1931(!), one place on Bangs (only been there once so far) will sell you mocha lattes but won't make you a hot chocolate (I'm not a coffee drinker, give me Monster Energy! At least America's Cup in AP makes hot chocolate), there is a sandwich shop called the "Speakeatery" which despite the pun and steampunk influenced sign design sells no liquor (though that's my only complaint about it, good sandwiches so far, though they need to buy better bread! :-P ), the AP newsletter the TriCity News making conflicting/alternating headlines as to what "better development" is happening on either the Asbury Park beach or the Cookman Avenue downtown while not publishing any stories about how the rest of the city is doing (same with Long Branch and Red Bank in terms of downtown development, the other two cities the newspaper alludes to), and a few others issues I could complain about! :-D (not to mention my visits to Montclair, and I might visit the other NJ cities listed in the NY Times article out of curiousness)

/long rambling rant
//not an excuse for the run on sentences, just an explanation
///I hope it was coherent enough for everyone to read it though!
 
2013-02-17 04:22:15 PM  

lilplatinum: No I am saying variety and quality beats just quality.  I'm sure you have some decent local bar.  Here, however, you have countless options all across the spectrum.  Do I want to go to a dive bar, hear some live jazz at the bar, fancy cocktail bar, huge wine bar, brewpub, beer garden, whiskey bar, after hours bar... whatever I'm in the mood for.  Sure there are some dogs, but hell, part of the fun of finding new places is the risk that they will suck - oh well, mark that one off the list and go a block away to another one.


I have all of those things easily and readily available to me as well.  Well, except after hours, but that's more of a legal issue than a lack of variety.  If it was legal, it'd exist.

Same with restaraunts.  Any conceivable type of cuisine is readily available to me.  I don't even know what Khazakstani food is, but a quick google search has shown me I could find out in a handful of minutes.

That's nice.  Plenty of variety here, too.  Maybe not an entire restaurant dedicated to a minor cuisine, but there's all sorts of different types of cuisines and flavors here.  Vegan and all, if one would like.

As for your incredibly specious claim that your food scene is superior to the cities, that is absurd.  NYC is ranked as one of the top culinary cities in the world by anyone who knows fark all about food.  I guess the French are just too snobby to award your hidden gems with any michelin stars.   The food here runs the gamut too, high priced high end or low priced street food - and yes, there is a lot of garbage mixed in with the good stuff.  But people who live here can kind of figure out the difference fairly quick if they care to make an attempt.

I think that you're mistaking what I wrote.  I said I can get food superior to most restaurants in my own home.  That's because both my wife and I can cook.  I've eaten at many fine restaurants, in most of the major cities in the country (and a few outside, too) and rarely have I had something that one of us couldn't make better.  In fact, only one comes to mind and that was in Key West.  I will allow that some places that are stupid levels of expensive will outcook us, but the places that most folks are going to?  Easy to beat.

I'm willing to believe your place has better than the normal Olive Garden/TGI Fridays fare, but to put it up against the big boys in terms of options and the quality of the top places in both things is just naive.

Options, maybe.  Quality - not so much.  Unless, that is, you're willing to spend stupid levels of money.  Like two people costing well north of 2 bills stupid.

Healthier?  That doesn't make sense.  There is essentially nothing healthier about where you live unless you are breathing in heavy smog everyday or something.

Really?  Are you that uneducated on the air quality levels?  In NYC you're surrounded by cars and air quality issues. I've seen the haze hanging over the city in the morning.  Out here I have none of that.  That's healthier.  On top of that, I've got less stress, more ability to exercise for free and outside.  We've also got a house to maintain, which takes work and effort.  Much easier to stay healthy.  And, due to the air quality, healthier.

Posts like this make it sound that everyone who lives in NYC is living in alphabet city circa 1987.   When you live in high population density you do have to deal with the fact that other human beings are around, but we are not wading knee deep through trash and stepping over junkies every few seconds.  Oh dear, an occasional mild annoyance asking you for change, whatever shall you do!   Being around humanity is not stressful enough to deter one from the benefits of living among them - and I say this as a misanthrope who generally despises humanity.

In that, I'm much the same.  I don't like people.  In fact, one of the great things about living here is that I can get up in the morning (I'm naturally a morning person) and get to Starbucks, go to the hardware store, go to the grocery, and any other errands I like - all in less than an hour.  Almost no wait time whatsoever to get what I need.  Even in a very nice area, like where we live, very little actual interaction with the general public.  And never, ever will we see beggars (of course, that doesn't mean they don't exist in the city - just that they aren't allowed where we live).

Nature, however, is just a constant annoyance.  There is a reason humanity has a general trend of destroying nature to erect cities - primarily because it is dirty, filled with annoyances, and generally useless.

An annoyance?  So it's actual life that you can't handle.

Face it - living where I live has basically every benefit that your city life has, along with none of the annoyances and at significantly less cost to us.  It's superior to your life.
 
2013-02-17 07:13:03 PM  

ronaprhys: lilplatinum:



Can we just agree that you're both self-important toolbags who desperately need to feel better than someone else? Christ.
 
2013-02-17 07:24:47 PM  

DarkSoulNoHope: balisane: DarkSoulNoHope: balisane: What's up with this country mouse/city mouse pissing contest?

I never understood it. I would enjoy the city life better for convenience, but understand the people's enjoyment of privacy and quietness.  Though I do love the hipster/anti-hipster pissing contests, those are the good ones! :)

Heh. The only hipsters that genuinely irritate me are the trust-fund babies, and their attitudes would be unbearable no matter what kind of obnoxious shoes they were wearing. Otherwise, live and let live, man; most people grow out of the dumbass parts of their chosen subculture eventually.

For me I guess it's both, more so the trust-fund babies (for the attitude and the fact that they're lifestyle is subsidized by their parents) than the regular hipsters, but both still annoy me enough. Pretty much for the fact that Hipsters steal from every prior subculture, which would be fine if they treated it like "found art", but instead they just pretend it's their own original creation and get snooty towards the practitioners of the subculture they stole from. Like when you visit a Hipster owned music store and I would be looking for Goth music, it won't be in a specific section for Goth music, instead it will be "Post Punk" (which was, in my opinion, a lazy term by a magazine writer in the 70s to describe bands that were formerly a punk band but started the Goth music style and subculture, when even Ian Curtis of Joy Division was giving himself the "Goth" label back then) for many Goth bands that were far beyond the early Post Punk leanings (such as Sisters of Mercy, Death in June, and a few others) or some worse, made up terms, such as "Post Industrial Noize", because the Hipsters seem to be either afraid or ashamed of the dark connotations the "Goth" label brings when they listen to Goth music. (also if you watch Portlandia, they weren't kidding [sadly] about the "bad customer service" jokes at some of these stores!) Plus the fact that something goe ...



Well, accepting a preexisting label would mean admitting that someone was not only there before, them, but explored the theme!!  It wasn't just some obscure, lonely band hidden away in a dustbin! D:


And it's funny; i often encounter people's irritation about hipsters co-opting everything they see without context, but rarely encounter the hipster who actually does it.  Maybe it's because most of the people i know are academics and/or rampaging nerds of the first water, but they're often quite proud of knowing a complete history behind every gewgaw and mini-movement they might hoover up out of the run of history like so many catfish at the bottom of a mill pond.   So at least not every hipster is a useless bag of crap.  A lot of them, i'll grant you.
 
2013-02-17 07:44:34 PM  

balisane: ronaprhys: lilplatinum:


Can we just agree that you're both self-important toolbags who desperately need to feel better than someone else? Christ.


Frsrsly - there aren't enough words in your post.  We're much, much more verbose than you are.

And that makes us better people.  Even if she and her boobs do live in the city.
 
2013-02-17 08:28:57 PM  
No shiat, complaining about people arguing their superiority based on some insignificant metric - someone missed the entire point of the internet...   probably lives in Staten Island and is bitter.
 
2013-02-17 11:22:50 PM  

balisane: And it's funny; i often encounter people's irritation about hipsters co-opting everything they see without context, but rarely encounter the hipster who actually does it. Maybe it's because most of the people i know are academics and/or rampaging nerds of the first water, but they're often quite proud of knowing a complete history behind every gewgaw and mini-movement they might hoover up out of the run of history like so many catfish at the bottom of a mill pond. So at least not every hipster is a useless bag of crap. A lot of them, i'll grant you.


Well, that's why I gave alot of context to prove my point (probably too much, sorry about that :-P ), though I did forget about the new store Fetish which seems to be catering to the recently formed "Hipster Goth" genre and reminds me of this video of David Bowie's wife Iman chastising a French-Canadian Hipster woman in a fashion design reality show for making Goth her "trashy" fashion choice and describing the Hipster's design "Goth Lite"! (pretty much the owner or employee of Fetish who described the store to me said it was very "hip", which to me actually seemed mostly cheap, lower quality Tripp brand outfits, skinny jeans, and band shirts (a mini-Hot Topic without Invader Zim merchandise); none of the items sold remind me of any "fetish"; but they did start selling T.U.K. shoes after my first visit so it is an improvement) Also a vinyl store where the owner just goes out to the nearby flea markets, buys records for $1 to $2 dollars and bumps up the price ten to fifty fold depending on the artist (plus the guy's personality is quite bad in other ways too)! I am glad though there are a good many Hipsters that don't fit the "self felicitating superficial jerk" mold and I hope they come to Asbury Park soon because I'm getting tired of dealing with the ones I have nearby! :)
 
2013-02-18 07:32:50 AM  

lilplatinum: No shiat, complaining about people arguing their superiority based on some insignificant metric - someone missed the entire point of the internet...   probably lives in Staten Island and is bitter.


Or if not Staten Island, somewhere like Boise.
 
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