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(Des Moines Register)   If you're a farmer and a hunter, snowmobiler, or sports enthusiast hurts themselves on your property, you're legally in the clear. But if one teacher in your barn on field trip falls through a hay hole, you better lawyer up   (desmoinesregister.com) divider line 51
    More: Strange, Courts of Iowa, field trips, Fayette County, Iowa, concurring opinions, friend of the courts, Iowa Supreme Court, recreations  
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4022 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Feb 2013 at 5:22 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-16 04:31:53 PM
This is stupid. It is the own farmers' fault for not having the administrators sign a legal document protecting them from lawsuits occurring from accidents on the property.

Or at least posting "No Fatties" signs around the areas of the property that could result in accidents involving obese people.

Seriously, it was her fault for being so fat that she broke the hay loft.
 
2013-02-16 05:25:19 PM
More importantly, where's the video on Youtube?
 
2013-02-16 05:26:33 PM
To sum up scumsuckingmaggotlawyers ruin everything.  And by scumsuckingmaggotlawyers I mean all lawyers.
 
2013-02-16 05:31:21 PM
hay hole
hay hole
hayholehayholehayhole

That's fun to say.

/hay hole
 
2013-02-16 05:31:32 PM
The snowmobiler booby trapping that people used to do was pretty creepy.  You'd see the chains strung between trees, so it wasn't just stories.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-02-16 05:36:38 PM
We have a similar distinction in Massachusetts law. You can't sue the owner if you were using the land for recreation without charge. But one guy argued he was not recreating, he was commuting when he hit a pile of mulch, fell off his bike, and broke his elbows. He won the initial trial court ruling and the defendant state agency settled. (decision)
 
2013-02-16 05:36:48 PM

noitsnot: The snowmobiler booby trapping that people used to do was pretty creepy.  You'd see the chains strung between trees, so it wasn't just stories


snowmobiles tend to tear the shiat out of farms and wood lots when they carve trails through, and they generally aren't welcome because of this and their tendency to throw beer cans and shiat all over. I don't agree with putting up booby traps, but I sure as hell agree with well marked blockages of access routes. If they're too drunk to recognize a bright orange barrier, fark em.
 
2013-02-16 05:37:54 PM

noitsnot: The snowmobiler booby trapping that people used to do was pretty creepy.  You'd see the chains strung between trees, so it wasn't just stories.


I have to admit, I've considered it.  I only have 7 acres and I don't depend on it to make money, like the farmers to, but it pisses me off when my land is destroyed by clowns on 4 wheelers or snowmobiles.

/I've opted to pile my brush at seemingly random but very strategic points on the edge of my property
//all you can get rose bushes fairly cheap at Home Depot if you don't mind semi scrawny ones, not much for flowering but they grow well and have thorns
 
2013-02-16 05:38:20 PM
Good thing he wasn't a corn farmer.
 
2013-02-16 05:38:35 PM
I'm a fat fat fattie, I try to stay away from trap doors and rickety chairs.  This lady probably does too.  But this dude covered up the hay drop so the lady couldn't see it.  You invite people onto your property and fail to warn them of dangers, and actively cover up dangers?  Pretty easy to see liability there.  It's a very basic rule in property law to at least warn people of dangers.  But it's all a lawyers fault because derp
 
2013-02-16 05:41:56 PM

noitsnot: The snowmobiler booby trapping that people used to do was pretty creepy.  You'd see the chains strung between trees, so it wasn't just stories.


If it pisses you off, why don't you try staying on your own property or obtaining permission first?
 
2013-02-16 05:42:08 PM
Horseback riding and "nature study" - the kindergartners' activities included feeding a calf - may have been covered by the law, Appel writes. But "it is difficult to characterize frolicking in a hayloft as part of a guided tour of an improved barn on a dairy farm as nature study within the meaning of the statute.

Y'know what I was doing the last time I went up in a hay loft? Hint, I was feeding something.

They do know what hay is right. And thus why its proximity to the other farm stuff.
 
2013-02-16 05:43:17 PM

ha-ha-guy: noitsnot: The snowmobiler booby trapping that people used to do was pretty creepy.  You'd see the chains strung between trees, so it wasn't just stories.

I have to admit, I've considered it.  I only have 7 acres and I don't depend on it to make money, like the farmers to, but it pisses me off when my land is destroyed by clowns on 4 wheelers or snowmobiles.

/I've opted to pile my brush at seemingly random but very strategic points on the edge of my property
//all you can get rose bushes fairly cheap at Home Depot if you don't mind semi scrawny ones, not much for flowering but they grow well and have thorns


Try Honey Locust trees:

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-16 05:46:21 PM
People who haven't seen their own genitalia in years should be instantly at fault for all injuries caused by them overpowering whatever they were standing on that normal humans wouldn't have a chance of breaking.  Enough's enough, stop being fat and more importantly stop using it as an excuse to break people's stuff and get away with it.
 
2013-02-16 05:47:14 PM

Champion of the Sun: I'm a fat fat fattie, I try to stay away from trap doors and rickety chairs.  This lady probably does too.  But this dude covered up the hay drop so the lady couldn't see it.  You invite people onto your property and fail to warn them of dangers, and actively cover up dangers?  Pretty easy to see liability there.  It's a very basic rule in property law to at least warn people of dangers.  But it's all a lawyers fault because derp


ya not every one is a farm kid who grew up climbing around barns

the property owner basically set up a "PitFall" then told no one he was covering large holes with hay

knowing there where children and non-farm people coming he should have covered the holes with some plywood or warned the Adults that the loft cant support a adults wight

//also no one would think this was a joke if a group of kids fell down the hole
 
2013-02-16 05:49:52 PM
noitsnot: The snowmobiler booby trapping that people used to do was pretty creepy.  You'd see the chains strung between trees, so it wasn't just stories.

I have to admit, I've considered it.  I only have 7 acres and I don't depend on it to make money, like the farmers to, but it pisses me off when my land is destroyed by clowns on 4 wheelers or snowmobiles.

/I've opted to pile my brush at seemingly random but very strategic points on the edge of my property
//all you can get rose bushes fairly cheap at Home Depot if you don't mind semi scrawny ones, not much for flowering but they grow well and have thorns


CSB: When I was in about grade 2 (I went to a K-12 school) someone kept knocking down our snow forts at night. One day, the junior and senior high schools were all away on a field trip and we had a free day. We spent from about 9 - 3 building the thickest snowfort we could and pouring water on it, making sure we had finished and hid all the evidence before the high schoolers got back. The next day our snowfort was still there and there was a snowmobile track leading to the wall he hit and what appeared to be truck treads from whoever it was having to load their snowmobile back onto the truck. We found bits and pieces of the front of that snowmobile for months lol. Something to keep in mind. 0:)


 
2013-02-16 05:50:16 PM
Normally I wouldn't side with the lawyers or people who sue over shiat like this, but if you open your property up to tours then you should be held as accountable as any other business or tourist attraction would.
 
2013-02-16 05:50:43 PM

thenumber5: ya not every one is a farm kid who grew up climbing around barns

the property owner basically set up a "PitFall" then told no one he was covering large holes with hay


That was my exact point.  If it was obvious the lady would've stayed away from it and the accident wouldn't have happened.
 
2013-02-16 05:52:15 PM
The hay hole was remarkable.
 
2013-02-16 05:54:03 PM
Was the hay hole tested for traces of semen?
 
2013-02-16 05:54:22 PM

MayoBoy: Good thing he wasn't a corn farmer.


Thank god there are still a few clever people left on fark.  Nicely done!
 
2013-02-16 05:54:38 PM

thenumber5: Champion of the Sun: I'm a fat fat fattie, I try to stay away from trap doors and rickety chairs.  This lady probably does too.  But this dude covered up the hay drop so the lady couldn't see it.  You invite people onto your property and fail to warn them of dangers, and actively cover up dangers?  Pretty easy to see liability there.  It's a very basic rule in property law to at least warn people of dangers.  But it's all a lawyers fault because derp

ya not every one is a farm kid who grew up climbing around barns

the property owner basically set up a "PitFall" then told no one he was covering large holes with hay

knowing there where children and non-farm people coming he should have covered the holes with some plywood or warned the Adults that the loft cant support a adults wight

//also no one would think this was a joke if a group of kids fell down the hole


ReapTheChaos: Normally I wouldn't side with the lawyers or people who sue over shiat like this, but if you open your property up to tours then you should be held as accountable as any other business or tourist attraction would.


THIS. And the insurance wouldn't even be that much I imagine. Just tell them you'll have school field trips there sometimes and that they won't be allowed to touch the various farm equipment.

/spent most of the day price-shopping performers insurance: "We cover: Eligible Performers: Clowns and Santas, Face Painters, Balloon Twisters, Jugglers, Magicians, Fire Dancers, Stage Hypnotists, Caricature Artists, Street Performers, Comedy Acts, Aerialists, Storytellers, Minstrels, Children Entertainers
//We Do Not Cover: Fireworks, Pyrotechnic Operations, Animals (including: mammals, and fowl.), Athletic Participation, Your business employees/subcontractors, Trackless Trains, Moonwalks, Jump houses (or other amusement rides and attractions), Instruction
///No moonwalking! You can dance with fire and do aerial acts while hypnotized but no moonwalking!

O_o
 
2013-02-16 05:56:44 PM
What about their daughters?

i291.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-16 05:57:57 PM

AgentKGB: CSB: When I was in about grade 2 (I went to a K-12 school) someone kept knocking down our snow forts at night. One day, the junior and senior high schools were all away on a field trip and we had a free day. We spent from about 9 - 3 building the thickest snowfort we could and pouring water on it, making sure we had finished and hid all the evidence before the high schoolers got back. The next day our snowfort was still there and there was a snowmobile track leading to the wall he hit and what appeared to be truck treads from whoever it was having to load their snowmobile back onto the truck. We found bits and pieces of the front of that snowmobile for months lol. Something to keep in mind. 0:)


With my property, the line on the west side is a stream/bog that runs down to the lake.  It works out so that the best route for both my neighbor and myself involves crossing both pieces of land based on a bend in the property line and a desire to avoid the bog.  So back in the 1990s we jointly built a trail, complete with a bridge over the stream that ran down to the lake where we each had a small boat dock, gazebo, and that type of stuff.

When quads as a sport became popular (and some of the cheaper models came out) people started tearing up part of that path as they dicked around.  The bridge itself was strong enough to support a Gator or similar utility tractor but one fall it was damaged by the wind.  So we slapped up some warning signs and caution tape just to cover our asses and waited for spring.  First week of Nov, the bridge collapsed as a pair of quads were going over it.  It was all of a 3 foot fall into knee deep water, but it was still a pleasure to watch a pair of bikers pushing their quads off our property and the sheriff intercepting them to hand out the trespassing citation.

/they even got in trouble with the DNR the pollution their quads did to the fresh water
//we've gone back and added gates and a split rail fence along the trail, but people pull it down to get onto the trail still
 
2013-02-16 06:01:19 PM

ha-ha-guy: AgentKGB: CSB: When I was in about grade 2 (I went to a K-12 school) someone kept knocking down our snow forts at night. One day, the junior and senior high schools were all away on a field trip and we had a free day. We spent from about 9 - 3 building the thickest snowfort we could and pouring water on it, making sure we had finished and hid all the evidence before the high schoolers got back. The next day our snowfort was still there and there was a snowmobile track leading to the wall he hit and what appeared to be truck treads from whoever it was having to load their snowmobile back onto the truck. We found bits and pieces of the front of that snowmobile for months lol. Something to keep in mind. 0:)

With my property, the line on the west side is a stream/bog that runs down to the lake.  It works out so that the best route for both my neighbor and myself involves crossing both pieces of land based on a bend in the property line and a desire to avoid the bog.  So back in the 1990s we jointly built a trail, complete with a bridge over the stream that ran down to the lake where we each had a small boat dock, gazebo, and that type of stuff.

When quads as a sport became popular (and some of the cheaper models came out) people started tearing up part of that path as they dicked around.  The bridge itself was strong enough to support a Gator or similar utility tractor but one fall it was damaged by the wind.  So we slapped up some warning signs and caution tape just to cover our asses and waited for spring.  First week of Nov, the bridge collapsed as a pair of quads were going over it.  It was all of a 3 foot fall into knee deep water, but it was still a pleasure to watch a pair of bikers pushing their quads off our property and the sheriff intercepting them to hand out the trespassing citation.

/they even got in trouble with the DNR the pollution their quads did to the fresh water
//we've gone back and added gates and a split rail fence along the trail, but people ...


Gasoline versus muscle powered pastimes.  They attract different kinds of people.
 
2013-02-16 06:01:37 PM

AgentKGB: ReapTheChaos: Normally I wouldn't side with the lawyers or people who sue over shiat like this, but if you open your property up to tours then you should be held as accountable as any other business or tourist attraction would.

THIS. And the insurance wouldn't even be that much I imagine. Just tell them you'll have school field trips there sometimes and that they won't be allowed to touch the various farm equipment.


Fark that.  Let the tourists buy trip insurance.
 
2013-02-16 06:04:14 PM

Thanks for the Meme-ries: What about their daughters?

[i291.photobucket.com image 500x705]


I bet her hay hole is remarkable.
 
2013-02-16 06:11:13 PM

AgentKGB: CSB: When I was in about grade 2 (I went to a K-12 school) someone kept knocking down our snow forts at night. One day, the junior and senior high schools were all away on a field trip and we had a free day. We spent from about 9 - 3 building the thickest snowfort we could and pouring water on it, making sure we had finished and hid all the evidence before the high schoolers got back. The next day our snowfort was still there and there was a snowmobile track leading to the wall he hit and what appeared to be truck treads from whoever it was having to load their snowmobile back onto the truck. We found bits and pieces of the front of that snowmobile for months lol. Something to keep in mind. 0:)


www.batterycentralmall.com
 
2013-02-16 06:14:58 PM

noitsnot: Gasoline versus muscle powered pastimes.  They attract different kinds of people.


I don't really blame the gasoline part of that.  It would be hypocritical of me since I'm an auto engineer and into course racing.  I've noticed though the offenders seem to be the kind of people who can't actually afford to play with the big dogs.  7 to 10k spread across a couple off road toys is the extent of their budget type.  When you manage to catch them loading or unloading the vehicle it always seems to be some beat to hell pickup that looks to be worth less than the ATV.

My biggest problems live right across the lake from me in what used to be the farmhands quarters when the entire swath of land was an apple orchard.  It's a dump and no one over there has an IQ above 100.  The first time they paid us a visit in the winter we were able to point the sheriff right at them via the tracks across the lake.  Now they cover those up as best they can and I'm stuck hoping the ice cracks on them or they can be caught in the act.

/this summer my neighbor and I are running a power source down to the lake for some cameras, coyote sensors, that kind of stuff
//at least force them to enter elsewhere and protect the beach area we built
 
2013-02-16 06:22:38 PM

ha-ha-guy: noitsnot: Gasoline versus muscle powered pastimes.  They attract different kinds of people.

I don't really blame the gasoline part of that.  It would be hypocritical of me since I'm an auto engineer and into course racing.  I've noticed though the offenders seem to be the kind of people who can't actually afford to play with the big dogs.  7 to 10k spread across a couple off road toys is the extent of their budget type.  When you manage to catch them loading or unloading the vehicle it always seems to be some beat to hell pickup that looks to be worth less than the ATV.

My biggest problems live right across the lake from me in what used to be the farmhands quarters when the entire swath of land was an apple orchard.  It's a dump and no one over there has an IQ above 100.  The first time they paid us a visit in the winter we were able to point the sheriff right at them via the tracks across the lake.  Now they cover those up as best they can and I'm stuck hoping the ice cracks on them or they can be caught in the act.

/this summer my neighbor and I are running a power source down to the lake for some cameras, coyote sensors, that kind of stuff
//at least force them to enter elsewhere and protect the beach area we built


Anything you can do:
1) Drunk
2) Sitting down
3) For less than $50

That's gonna rope in all the 'tards.  Amazing that when you visit the national parks, when you get more than 1000 feet from the parking lots, all the assholes just disappear *poof*
 
2013-02-16 06:31:29 PM
I'm going to sue subby for brain damage after trying to read that headline.
 
2013-02-16 06:38:53 PM

Thanks for the Meme-ries: What about their daughters?

[i291.photobucket.com image 500x705]


I bet you'd like to fall into her hay hole.
 
2013-02-16 06:41:37 PM

ha-ha-guy: noitsnot: The snowmobiler booby trapping that people used to do was pretty creepy.  You'd see the chains strung between trees, so it wasn't just stories.

I have to admit, I've considered it.  I only have 7 acres and I don't depend on it to make money, like the farmers to, but it pisses me off when my land is destroyed by clowns on 4 wheelers or snowmobiles.


We've only got an acre and a half and I've considered it. Winter is also known as Asshole Season at our house.
 
2013-02-16 06:48:49 PM
I bet he remembers to attach the rope next time.
 
2013-02-16 07:12:24 PM
My brother fell through a hay hole (about a 14 foot drop) when I was little, so I'm getting a kick, etc.

Seemed like he was laid up for a long time, but it was probably only a week or two. The doctor was all "Hand of God Almighty protecting him" about it, too.
 
2013-02-16 07:14:05 PM
Iowa farmers who open their operations to indoor tours aren't protected by a law that shields them from injuries to hunters, snowmobilers and other outdoor sports enthusiasts, the Iowa Supreme Court ruled Friday.

Right here. The duty one owes to a licensee is quite different from the duty owed to a trespasser. And the duty owed to an invitee is even greater.

If the person is on your property illegally, like a snowmobiler who crosses your property or a hunter who's out looking for grouse, you only have a duty to protect him from known artificial hazards, assuming you know or have reason to know he's there. If he falls into a natural hole, that's his problem. (If you don't know they're there, they're SOL)

But if you allowed him to come onto your property for business purposes (invitee), or he came onto your property for other reasons (licensee) permitted by you, then you have a duty to "make safe" all known hazards, and to warn of unsafe conditions the invitee or licensee is not able to discover on his own. And if they paid for the right to be there, then you have almost a 100% duty to ensure their safety.

So no, farmers don't get to claim "Hey, they went into the hayloft on their own, too bad so sad." They invited the tours and knew they were there--they had a duty to make safe or warn of hazards undiscoverable by the visitors. Including covered hay chutes. Lawyers win on this one.
 
2013-02-16 07:15:43 PM
i45.tinypic.com

Hay hole / corn hole
 
2013-02-16 07:20:43 PM
Im not sure why some of you guys have such beefs with snowmobilers. We didnt have 7 or 8 acres. We have about 800 acres -- In rural Canada where almost every single house has at least one skidoo. I have seen people drive into town on their skidoo for groceries.

The only time it was ever a problem was when it was a poker rally and 500 some people would show up to run their sleds on a course. With ATVs the common courtesy is to drive around the edge of crops but by time enough snow has fallen for sleds to run the ground is frozen solid and damage is pretty minimal.

98K514: We've only got an acre and a half and I've considered it. Winter is also known as Asshole Season at our house.


Are you kidding? You have a yard thats barely 100 yards by 100 yards and somehow you have enough of a problem with skidooers to call it asshole season? Either they are building a road right in front of your house or you are exaggerating.

Honest to god the only time people were pissed about sledders on their land was when they wanted to hold a rally on part of it.
 
2013-02-16 07:37:31 PM

mikefinch: Im not sure why some of you guys have such beefs with snowmobilers. We didnt have 7 or 8 acres. We have about 800 acres -- In rural Canada where almost every single house has at least one skidoo. I have seen people drive into town on their skidoo for groceries.

The only time it was ever a problem was when it was a poker rally and 500 some people would show up to run their sleds on a course. With ATVs the common courtesy is to drive around the edge of crops but by time enough snow has fallen for sleds to run the ground is frozen solid and damage is pretty minimal.

98K514: We've only got an acre and a half and I've considered it. Winter is also known as Asshole Season at our house.

Are you kidding? You have a yard thats barely 100 yards by 100 yards and somehow you have enough of a problem with skidooers to call it asshole season? Either they are building a road right in front of your house or you are exaggerating.

Honest to god the only time people were pissed about sledders on their land was when they wanted to hold a rally on part of it.


You're Canadian so you don't understand what real American assholes are like.

Seriously.
 
2013-02-16 07:47:23 PM
Before I read the story, I was thinking it was about someone hurting themselves from some natural or unforseen thing.  But the farmer put a bail of hay over an open hole, knowing that people would be standing on it.
 
2013-02-16 08:37:17 PM
Iowa farmers who open their operations to indoor tours aren't protected by a law that shields them from injuries to hunters, snowmobilers and other outdoor sports enthusiasts, the Iowa Supreme Court ruled Friday.

OK, so give all the kids/teachers guns on the way in; then they're "hunters".
 
2013-02-16 09:11:06 PM

mikefinch: Im not sure why some of you guys have such beefs with snowmobilers. We didnt have 7 or 8 acres. We have about 800 acres -- In rural Canada where almost every single house has at least one skidoo. I have seen people drive into town on their skidoo for groceries.

The only time it was ever a problem was when it was a poker rally and 500 some people would show up to run their sleds on a course. With ATVs the common courtesy is to drive around the edge of crops but by time enough snow has fallen for sleds to run the ground is frozen solid and damage is pretty minimal.

98K514: We've only got an acre and a half and I've considered it. Winter is also known as Asshole Season at our house.

Are you kidding? You have a yard thats barely 100 yards by 100 yards and somehow you have enough of a problem with skidooers to call it asshole season? Either they are building a road right in front of your house or you are exaggerating.

Honest to god the only time people were pissed about sledders on their land was when they wanted to hold a rally on part of it.


We've got a few hundred acres here in central Ontario. Snowmobilers are assholes. We used to let the trail cross our farm. Except they wouldn't stay on the trail. The year they completely ruined a new stand of alfalfa we told them they could run the trail somewhere else. Still get a lot of them cutting fence and ripping through the  fields.
 
2013-02-16 09:26:48 PM

amishkarl: Still get a lot of them cutting fence and ripping through the fields.


I think maybe the culture here is different then. I can think of hundreds of complete assholes who own sleds and not one would think of cutting a fence. What a dick move.

I have heard similar complaints about ATVs in Ontario and i dont get that either. ATV riders sound like jerks out there. They rip up peoples crops and cut fences and drive through the middle of fields. But after visiting Ontario i can see how it fits. I know why my dad moved out to Alberta in the 70s -- people in east Ontario are crazy tools and proud of it.

I grew up on ATVs and sleds and i have NEVER heard about most of this sort of thing.

How did they wreck up the alfalfa might i ask? Was the snow cover just thin? or did they compact the whole area and pack it all down? Im thinking we might just have a better freeze and snow cover up here around Grande Prairie.
 
2013-02-16 09:27:19 PM

Fark Rye For Many Whores: AgentKGB: CSB: When I was in about grade 2 (I went to a K-12 school) someone kept knocking down our snow forts at night. One day, the junior and senior high schools were all away on a field trip and we had a free day. We spent from about 9 - 3 building the thickest snowfort we could and pouring water on it, making sure we had finished and hid all the evidence before the high schoolers got back. The next day our snowfort was still there and there was a snowmobile track leading to the wall he hit and what appeared to be truck treads from whoever it was having to load their snowmobile back onto the truck. We found bits and pieces of the front of that snowmobile for months lol. Something to keep in mind. 0:)

[www.batterycentralmall.com image 400x440]


I already CSB'd it at the start bro  :P
 
2013-02-16 09:36:28 PM

mikefinch: amishkarl: Still get a lot of them cutting fence and ripping through the fields.

I think maybe the culture here is different then. I can think of hundreds of complete assholes who own sleds and not one would think of cutting a fence. What a dick move.

I have heard similar complaints about ATVs in Ontario and i dont get that either. ATV riders sound like jerks out there. They rip up peoples crops and cut fences and drive through the middle of fields. But after visiting Ontario i can see how it fits. I know why my dad moved out to Alberta in the 70s -- people in east Ontario are crazy tools and proud of it.

I grew up on ATVs and sleds and i have NEVER heard about most of this sort of thing.

How did they wreck up the alfalfa might i ask? Was the snow cover just thin? or did they compact the whole area and pack it all down? Im thinking we might just have a better freeze and snow cover up here around Grande Prairie.


Lot of people out of the cities with no respect for their nieghbours land. There's an attitude that unless its right by a house it must be public land. We're just outside the GTA.

Bit of both, It was just after the january thaw and we only had a couple inches of cover. They went all over the the field, packed it right down.
 
2013-02-16 09:40:19 PM

amishkarl: Lot of people out of the cities with no respect for their nieghbours land. There's an attitude that unless its right by a house it must be public land. We're just outside the GTA.

Bit of both, It was just after the january thaw and we only had a couple inches of cover. They went all over the the field, packed it right down


-also, I don't think its that the people are worse, just the population density is a lot higher than out there, Lot less likely to know any one that owns land to get their perspective.
 
2013-02-16 10:05:43 PM

mikefinch: Im not sure why some of you guys have such beefs with snowmobilers. We didnt have 7 or 8 acres. We have about 800 acres -- In rural Canada where almost every single house has at least one skidoo. I have seen people drive into town on their skidoo for groceries.

The only time it was ever a problem was when it was a poker rally and 500 some people would show up to run their sleds on a course. With ATVs the common courtesy is to drive around the edge of crops but by time enough snow has fallen for sleds to run the ground is frozen solid and damage is pretty minimal.

98K514: We've only got an acre and a half and I've considered it. Winter is also known as Asshole Season at our house.

Are you kidding? You have a yard thats barely 100 yards by 100 yards and somehow you have enough of a problem with skidooers to call it asshole season? Either they are building a road right in front of your house or you are exaggerating.

Honest to god the only time people were pissed about sledders on their land was when they wanted to hold a rally on part of it.


We live on the corner of a dirt road and the main drag . They cut through our yard instead of staying on the dirt road to cross the main drag and cut through our backyard to get into the neighbor's cornfields. Yes, when there's three inches of snow on the ground we have enough of a problem with skidooers to call it Asshole Season. "Common courtesy" isn't part of any snowmobiler's vernacular.

/why the fark am I defending myself to you? Snowmobilers are assholes the world 'round, I guess
 
2013-02-16 10:13:12 PM

98K514: Yes, when there's three inches of snow


Where i come from thats mid october. 3 inches of snow? Do they need to buy new runners every year? When you hear "CHRHRASKSKRAKSKSKARAKSKRSKRASSRSR" underneath you its to early for sledding.
 
2013-02-17 12:24:50 AM
My first thought was that no one 'very large' should be standing on hay or hay bales no matter what the farmer says about it supporting your weight.  A person like that should only stand on the ground.

However, in this case the farmer covered up a hole with something that could not support the weight of a human being, then he let people get on it.  He went ouf his way to make a trap and sure enough, he caught a big one.  It's his fault.
 
2013-02-17 04:28:19 AM

ha-ha-guy: noitsnot: The snowmobiler booby trapping that people used to do was pretty creepy.  You'd see the chains strung between trees, so it wasn't just stories.

I have to admit, I've considered it.  I only have 7 acres and I don't depend on it to make money, like the farmers to, but it pisses me off when my land is destroyed by clowns on 4 wheelers or snowmobiles.

/I've opted to pile my brush at seemingly random but very strategic points on the edge of my property
//all you can get rose bushes fairly cheap at Home Depot if you don't mind semi scrawny ones, not much for flowering but they grow well and have thorns


So you're more of the "invasive species" style of farmer?
 
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