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(My San Antonio)   If you're a prosecutor in Texas, and you hide DNA evidence to convict an innocent man of murdering his wife allowing the actual murderer to go free, then we'll promote you to Judge   (mysanantonio.com) divider line 139
    More: Asinine, justices, DNA evidence, Texas, DNA  
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11337 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Feb 2013 at 12:28 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-16 09:24:24 AM
it is about time this a**hole gets his.

he has been screwing people since the 70's
 
NFA [TotalFark]
2013-02-16 09:28:43 AM
Is there anything Texas CAN'T f*ck up?
 
2013-02-16 09:29:29 AM
I think this kind of thing isn't limited to Texas.
 
2013-02-16 09:31:40 AM
It's all about the convictions

/justice gonna get raped
 
2013-02-16 09:32:12 AM
Its a shame that one cannot get the chair for ruining lives like this.

Why is this farker not behind bars yet?
 
2013-02-16 09:32:31 AM
FTFA: "I think we saw someone who is still struggling with denial and anger, a man who has spent at least three decades in power who for the first time is having to answer for his actions."

I think the damage he has done over his entire career will be hard to quantify.  So lets go ahead and give him the death penalty.  Make an example of him like he has done so many times in the past.
 
2013-02-16 09:32:55 AM

NFA: Is there anything Texas CAN'T f*ck up?


Steak

There aint nothing better than a nice Texas Steak
 
2013-02-16 09:39:02 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's all about the convictions


Yep, the more notches you get on your belt, the better chance you have of being elected to public office. And God forbid if you're an innocent person and you happen to get in their way when they need to show the public just how tough on crime they are.
 
2013-02-16 09:54:57 AM
I think Penn and Teller said it best.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YXEcvXARM8
 
2013-02-16 10:00:41 AM
Prosecutors are the most evil people people I've had the non-pleasure of being around.
 
2013-02-16 10:07:13 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's all about the convictions


Especially in TFA:  Williamson County
 
2013-02-16 10:07:50 AM

PreMortem: Prosecutors are the most evil people people I've had the non-pleasure of being around.


goregirl.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-02-16 10:23:41 AM
looks like people didn't actually rtfa
 
2013-02-16 10:31:46 AM

tenpoundsofcheese: looks like people didn't actually rtfa




How so?
 
2013-02-16 10:44:08 AM

tenpoundsofcheese: looks like people didn't actually rtfa I'm trolling again.


Yup, it does.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-02-16 11:14:32 AM
Why is this farker not behind bars yet?

The statute of limitations for perjury in Texas is two or three years. I doubt contempt of court would have a decades long limitations period.

I think this kind of thing isn't limited to Texas.

In Massachusetts we had the Fells Acres day care hysteria. Prosecutors just couldn't let go after the conviction was called into question.
 
2013-02-16 11:19:38 AM

tenpoundsofcheese: looks like people didn't actually rtfa


We didn't?  Please proceed.

/this should be fun
 
2013-02-16 11:32:54 AM

clancifer: tenpoundsofcheese: looks like people didn't actually rtfa

We didn't?  Please proceed.

/this should be fun


Look, if we let innocent people out of jail for crimes they didn't commit, we're just telling the criminals that they can do whatever they want.  THIS IS ALL OBAMA'S FAULT.  HE'S PUTTING US IN CAMPS.

/in case tpoc doesn't back, I decided to paraphrase the derp
 
2013-02-16 12:30:22 PM
Ken Anderson, now a Williamson County district judge, testified repeatedly during a rare court of inquiry that he had little memory of the trial or the case


Of course he doesn't.
 
2013-02-16 12:38:14 PM
Monsters are real. And the monsters are us.
 
2013-02-16 12:39:25 PM

PreMortem: Prosecutors are the most evil people people I've had the non-pleasure of being around.


Followed closely by defense attorneys. Then lawyers in general.
 
2013-02-16 12:43:33 PM
As long as we have an adversarial system, prosecutors should be able to serve for only a few years, and prevented from holding any other office once they're done. They can go back to hanging a shingle out, but can't use their "record" in advertising, etc.
 
2013-02-16 12:43:47 PM
www.jgrisham.com

Best non-fiction book I have ever read.
 
2013-02-16 12:46:04 PM
Yeah, pretty clearly just another case of prosecutorial misconduct, and a serious one. If this guy really wasn't aware that he was 'making mistakes', he's not merely incompetent as an attorney but inescapably not a competent adult. He shouldn't have a driver's license, much less hold a public office.
 
2013-02-16 12:46:11 PM
Hmmm, Texas?  *checks article*  Ayyyyyup, Texas.
 
2013-02-16 12:46:28 PM
Prosecutors are some of the biggest scumbags this country has ever created.
 
2013-02-16 12:48:24 PM

Jekylman: Hmmm, Texas?  *checks article*  Ayyyyyup, Texas.


Or just read the 6th word in the headline.
 
2013-02-16 12:48:51 PM
Prosecutorial immunity is hardly ever stripped.  Wonder if this guy will get to use it at the end of this inquiry.
 
2013-02-16 12:49:15 PM
What's a five-letter word for "God"?
 
2013-02-16 12:51:30 PM
Zimbabwe needs judges.
 
2013-02-16 12:53:22 PM
So the man spent 25 years behind bars for a crime he didn't commit. He had free room-and-board, free meals and access to a gym, TV and a library. What's the problem?
 
2013-02-16 12:54:13 PM

MFAWG: Ken Anderson, now a Williamson County district judge, testified repeatedly during a rare court of inquiry that he had little memory of the trial or the case


Of course he doesn't.


Give him a break. Acts of obstruction tend to blend together after a few years.
 
2013-02-16 12:55:46 PM

Rapmaster2000: I think this kind of thing isn't limited to Texas.


No, but Texas has it honed to a very precise art.
 
2013-02-16 12:56:13 PM
So THAT'S how you get to be a judge!
 
2013-02-16 12:56:18 PM

tenpoundsofcheese: looks like people didn't actually rtfa


Chickenshiat biatch says what?
 
2013-02-16 12:56:39 PM
Reminds me of a story (from PA I think) I saw here a couple years ago.  Judge was found to be getting kickbacks from a private prison when he sentenced people to prison terms.  Even after it came to light that the judge was getting paid to find people guilty there were prosecutors that didn't want new trials granted for the people they convicted with that judge presiding over the case.  One of them even said that it would ruin his track record and hurt his career during an interview, which had to be one of the most sociopathic things I've ever heard in my life.  Yeah, cuz what happened to all those other people didn't hurt their track records or hurt their careers at all; it's all about you and your ambitions, douchebag.

I also remember one of the prosecutors saying that if it was a trial by jury, then it shouldn't matter if the judge was getting kickbacks, because it was the jury that brought down the verdict.  Yeah, cuz the judge has no impact on things like what evidence can be shown, what lines of questioning are allowed, and certainly doesn't give instructions to the jury.  The fact that a practicing attorney could say that and not be disbarred was beyond me.
 
2013-02-16 12:57:40 PM

DubyaHater: So the man spent 25 years behind bars for a crime he didn't commit. He had free room-and-board, free meals and access to a gym, TV and a library. What's the problem?


This.  I mean, his wife is dead.  What the hell else is he going to do with his time?
 
2013-02-16 12:57:55 PM

DubyaHater: So the man spent 25 years behind bars for a crime he didn't commit. He had free room-and-board, free meals and access to a gym, TV and a library. What's the problem?


0/10
 
2013-02-16 12:57:57 PM
If I read the article correctly, he didn't cover up DNA, he covered up exculpatory evidence that there was a different man seen in the area at the time.

He ought to be convicted just for that scuba-gear-as-disguise theory. What's good here is that he's actually being tried on his crap. The prosecutors in the 1980s satanic cult child abuse hysteria, like the McMartin case, should have gotten the same. But I bet if he's convicted he'll get some slap on the wrist such as one day of jail time, like that execrable piece of human garbage, Mike Nifong.
 
2013-02-16 01:00:48 PM

MFAWG: Ken Anderson, now a Williamson County district judge, testified repeatedly during a rare court of inquiry that he had little memory of the trial or the case


Of course he doesn't.


It only made his career, and he has recounted it as one of the seminal moments... and he's previously defended his handling of it.  But it's easy to just "forget" these things when you need to.
 
2013-02-16 01:00:55 PM

ZAZ: Why is this farker not behind bars yet?

The statute of limitations for perjury in Texas is two or three years. I doubt contempt of court would have a decades long limitations period.

I think this kind of thing isn't limited to Texas.

In Massachusetts we had the Fells Acres day care hysteria. Prosecutors just couldn't let go after the conviction was called into question.


This is BEYOND perjury.
 
2013-02-16 01:01:05 PM

Don't Troll Me Bro!: Reminds me of a story (from PA I think) I saw here a couple years ago.  Judge was found to be getting kickbacks from a private prison when he sentenced people to prison terms.  Even after it came to light that the judge was getting paid to find people guilty there were prosecutors that didn't want new trials granted for the people they convicted with that judge presiding over the case.  One of them even said that it would ruin his track record and hurt his career during an interview, which had to be one of the most sociopathic things I've ever heard in my life.  Yeah, cuz what happened to all those other people didn't hurt their track records or hurt their careers at all; it's all about you and your ambitions, douchebag.

I also remember one of the prosecutors saying that if it was a trial by jury, then it shouldn't matter if the judge was getting kickbacks, because it was the jury that brought down the verdict.  Yeah, cuz the judge has no impact on things like what evidence can be shown, what lines of questioning are allowed, and certainly doesn't give instructions to the jury.  The fact that a practicing attorney could say that and not be disbarred was beyond me.


The case you're remembering is worse than that.

If it's the case I'm thinking of, it was a  *juvie court*. He was sentencing CHILDREN to prison terms in a juvie facility in exchange for kickbacks. He wasn't just ruining the lives of adults, he was destroying families and imprisoning kids *during formative years*.
 
2013-02-16 01:06:42 PM

ZAZ: Why is this farker not behind bars yet?

The statute of limitations for perjury in Texas is two or three years. I doubt contempt of court would have a decades long limitations period.

I think this kind of thing isn't limited to Texas.

In Massachusetts we had the Fells Acres day care hysteria. Prosecutors just couldn't let go after the conviction was called into question.


Still the prosecutor's actions lead to the murder of a woman a year later.

Should he be tried for murder? No. But he is at least an accessory to the crime.
 
2013-02-16 01:07:47 PM
Their job is to get convictions. Once the trial started, should he jeopardize his conviction record just because the guy probably didn't do it? Anyways, he was probably guilty of something, right?

That's some rootin tootin prosecutin right thar!
 
2013-02-16 01:08:40 PM
Texas is big on frying people for this type of thing. How the hell did he escape that?
 
2013-02-16 01:08:42 PM

Champion of the Sun: Prosecutorial immunity is hardly ever stripped.  Wonder if this guy will get to use it at the end of this inquiry.


Immunitiy is invoked to get shiat dismissed before the trial stage.  If he's already at the trial stage, I think that means immunity doesn't apply. I don't think it can be asserted as a defense once you are in trial, only as a claim to get a summary judgment or dismissal in your favor.  Also, immunity generally only applies so long as your are actin in accordance with established laws or agency rules, not acting in direct contravention of them, such as what is alleged in this case, inentional conealment of exculpatory evidence.

It'll be very interesting to see how this plays out as all of the facts and details come to light.

/IANAL, YMMV
 
2013-02-16 01:17:54 PM
This guy's story literally  brought me to tears when I read the full account of it (in Salon, I think).  I hope he, his wife, his son, their entire family, and those of the other women the actual culprit killed, get the justice they deserve.
 
2013-02-16 01:18:19 PM
That's pretty farked up. 25 years in jail for something you didn't do, not to mention that someone killed your wife, and you have not only lost her, but your son as well, and a good chunk of your life. I'm not saying this guy railroaded the suspect, or hid evidence on purpose, but it looks pretty fishy, and if he was aware of the testimony of the kid, he should have shared it with the defense. Either way, this poor guy got farked nineteen ways to sunday and got seconds. At least he has some life back, and hopefully a good payout.
 
2013-02-16 01:22:43 PM

Felgraf: Don't Troll Me Bro!: Reminds me of a story (from PA I think) I saw here a couple years ago.  Judge was found to be getting kickbacks from a private prison when he sentenced people to prison terms.  Even after it came to light that the judge was getting paid to find people guilty there were prosecutors that didn't want new trials granted for the people they convicted with that judge presiding over the case.  One of them even said that it would ruin his track record and hurt his career during an interview, which had to be one of the most sociopathic things I've ever heard in my life.  Yeah, cuz what happened to all those other people didn't hurt their track records or hurt their careers at all; it's all about you and your ambitions, douchebag.

I also remember one of the prosecutors saying that if it was a trial by jury, then it shouldn't matter if the judge was getting kickbacks, because it was the jury that brought down the verdict.  Yeah, cuz the judge has no impact on things like what evidence can be shown, what lines of questioning are allowed, and certainly doesn't give instructions to the jury.  The fact that a practicing attorney could say that and not be disbarred was beyond me.

The case you're remembering is worse than that.

If it's the case I'm thinking of, it was a  *juvie court*. He was sentencing CHILDREN to prison terms in a juvie facility in exchange for kickbacks. He wasn't just ruining the lives of adults, he was destroying families and imprisoning kids *during formative years*.


This was it I believe. Simply disgusting

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kids_for_cash_scandal
 
2013-02-16 01:28:28 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's all about the convictions

/justice gonna get raped


Yeah we get similar kinds of shenanigans up here in northern Maine, too.  Like, denying access to lawyers when you *supposedly* assaulted somebody.  Fortunately, the kid eventually had the charges dropped.
 
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