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(Patch)   Tebow bill sacked   (reston.patch.com) divider line 46
    More: Obvious, Tim Tebow, Virginia, United States Senate committees, extracurricular activities  
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11914 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Feb 2013 at 11:05 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-16 11:43:55 AM  
6 votes:
I'll go one further.

Let's remove all the competitive sports from our public schools and relegate them to special schools where all they do is sports and other athletic activities. No academics whatsoever-- Just sports.

We take the kids who are going to public school just to aim for a sports scholarship, and we stick them in the sports school, where they can play football, wrestle, cheer, or play other sports without all that messy learning to get in their way. They can put 100% of their efforts toward getting that scholarship to a sports college where they can be scouted and eventually make some sort of career out of their sports focus.

This has the added effect of getting all the stupid jocks out of the regular schools so that they aren't distracting students who actually want to learn something. It stops public schools from being tempted to pass total idiots through the system just because they're on the sports teams. It cuts down on bullying, I'm sure, because the jocks tend to also be the bullies. It cuts down on date-rape in the public schools, since-- again-- the jocks tend to be the ones who do this sort of thing (oh, come on. You know it's true.)

We get the disruptive jocks out of the academic system and get to focus on education, while the jocks get the benefit of not being bothered by having to learn anything that doesn't pertain to their sports of choice. Why should a guy whose sole career goal is playing football be concerned with algebra or creative writing? Even if he ends up as a sports announcer or sports radio DJ, he'll have the necessary skills for his audience without that academic stuff getting in the way of his game.

Public schools could actually spend some money on other extracurricular activities, instead of funneling every extra dollar into the sports programs. The other kids would get decent programs for a change.

I remember when I was in high school, the school board actually voted two years in a row for the music boosters to divert a large portion of their funds to the football program, because the football team needed new jerseys and a new scoreboard. How nice it would have been for the music programs to get the equipment they needed!

I used to live in a town where they put most of their focus on the jazz music program, and very little focus on their sports teams. It was strange to see, but their jazz band was a huge draw for the school. The concerts they held were attended by people who didn't even have kids in the school. The money they made on ticket sales was significant. Students were scouted by universities and the military for their music programs. It was a whole different world, and the coolest thing was that the students who participated in the music program were also doing well in all their other classes. Nobody passed a kid just so he could be in the band. The students, being in an environment where sports was not at the top of the food chain, were driven to succeed in their classes because they wanted to, and because they weren't watching drooling idiots on the sports teams getting passed through classes without doing anything.

I have nothing against kids playing sports. I just see no reason why sports should be taught in a place where we send kids to get an education. It should be something that is separate from school. If people want their kid to be an athlete, then they should have to send them to a school that is for sports and sports alone. No public school should be taking a penny out of their budget for sports.

Yes, have a P.E. class. Teach them general fitness, exercise, and personal hygiene. Teach them about their body's health and how to maintain it. Leave sports as an activity that occurs outside the school, without school funds, and without it impacting students who do not participate in sports.

This whole idea that sports  belong in public schools is an old-fashioned, outdated, foolish notion that does nothing but make generation after generation produce hordes of uneducated idiots. It's time to separate sports from education. They have no reason to be paired together.
2013-02-16 11:09:14 AM  
6 votes:
The home school families are still paying school taxes, so why not let them participate?

Seems petty
2013-02-16 11:10:35 AM  
5 votes:
I'm not the biggest fan of home schooling, but as far as I'm concerned, their taxes go to support the school regardless, may as well let them play if they want.
2013-02-16 11:08:25 AM  
5 votes:
On one hand, those homeschool kids need all the reality exposure they can get. So welcome to the team.

OTOH, they're usually homeschooled for reasons like OMG TEH RELIJUNZ, which makes me want to deprive them of as many things as we possibly can.

So I'm ambivalent.
2013-02-16 11:40:31 AM  
4 votes:
My own experiences with co-workers who were homeschooling their kids almost always seemed to involve avoidance of racial minorities or liberal ideology (and usually both).  Most seemed like nice enough people who had a very restricted world view.
2013-02-16 11:29:29 AM  
4 votes:
In my high school, if players grades were below a certain level, they couldn't play, along with other rules regarding eligibility.

How do schools which allow home-schooled kids on the team extend these type of team rules, to ensure it's all fair(ish)?
2013-02-16 11:16:52 AM  
4 votes:
Why our sports programs in the United States so tightly intertwined with schools? Even though the university level they're combined. Can't cities and towns sponsor teams and let schools stick to education?

Derwood: The home school families are still paying school taxes, so why not let them participate?

Seems petty


In other threads on the subject I've been told that school sports are paid entirely by booster clubs. If this is true, why would being a taxpayer make a difference? And if it is not true, why are education dollars being spent on sports?
2013-02-16 11:14:39 AM  
4 votes:
If they want their kids to have social interactions, let them go to farking school.
2013-02-16 12:23:51 PM  
3 votes:
More issues:

There are limited spots on sports teams. Why should a student at a school, who is part of the school community, be bumped from a team or benched so that someone from outside the school can play instead.

How does it work at awards times? "Let's all congratulate our basketball team for a great season. And winning the county championship. We all know the team and are happy for their success. Well - not many of you know know Bob, who you won't have seen in classes because his parents dislike the school so much that they go to a lot of effort to avoid sending him here but apparently out basketball team is worthy of Bob, so congratulate Bob too, even though none of you know him.
2013-02-16 12:15:31 PM  
3 votes:
I played football in high school, my running backs coach was also my biology teacher. He was great at both, he played college ball and got a masters. I would like to know why you would think it's a good idea to let someone teach your kid to run, jump and throw a damn ball, but not let them teach little Johnny something you have no farking clue about?
2013-02-16 12:04:07 PM  
3 votes:

Who'stheBossisNotaFood: As an atheist who intends on homeschooling next year, I am getting a big kick out of these replies... There are many other reasons to homeschool besides religion. As a former teacher, I plan on homeschooling because the schools in my town are failing and I know that school is mostly a waste of time. That doesn't mean I am going to keep my kids locked in the house however. My one daughter has already gone to swimming and gymnastics classes and she currently attends a private preschool.

If these kids want to be on the team, why shouldn't they be allowed to try out?



As was mentioned earlier, I attended public school, I failed a class my first semester my senior year over attendance. As a result I was not allowed to run track in the spring. Sooooo...why should your kid be allowed to try out? How can you prove he passed YOUR first semester? If you want your damn kids on the team, let them go to that school.
2013-02-16 11:14:39 AM  
3 votes:
You don't have to be a religious nutjob to home school your children, but it sure helps.

If the little farkers were any good, I'm sure any local private school would be happy to have them on the team.  That's how the free market works.
2013-02-16 11:11:46 AM  
3 votes:
Let's just do away with competitive sports, anyway.  Check sometime to see how much it is costing your local school district.
2013-02-16 12:11:09 PM  
2 votes:
Banning home schoolers from playing in public schools sports is fine with me as long as the parents are made exempt from the state and local taxes and receive the federal voucher equal in what the feds spend per-child in that district. Neither side can have it both ways, if you pay you can play, otherwise you can foot the bill to start your own home school league.
2013-02-16 12:10:25 PM  
2 votes:
If you don't want to participate in society, you don't get to pick and choose. Society does.
2013-02-16 11:59:10 AM  
2 votes:
I work with kids. The home-school kids are certainly more educated, in the sense of book-learning. However, they are SO very incapable of socialization, they might as well be engineers. It's actually kinda spooky. I don't however, want to build a "sports" school, since all of the guys are going to wind up being sociopaths of a different order...like the NFL, NBA, etc.

An anecdote: An acquaintance of mine once ran the carnival business in the lower SE. He also ran the midget wrestling league. He kept them in their trailer. "Ya caint let em out", he said, "cuz they just go to a bar, git drunk, and gang up on somebody. What you do is open the trailer door, throw in some Veeny Weenies, and let em eat. Otherwise you got a mess on your hands, and no show!"

True.
2013-02-16 11:31:15 AM  
2 votes:
Another set of parents who want it both ways for their snowflake. No nasty public school academics without God, but by golly damn give me some football whether God is there or not.

Real Christians would organize a home-school sports league so they could pray before games.
2013-02-16 11:28:11 AM  
2 votes:
I am trying to figure who thinks this is a good idea: people who want to seclude themselves from the rest of the world with the exception of playing sports? It appears like the cross of the most intellectually incurious one percent of people in our society. Why the hell would we spend time deciding to look after their interests?
2013-02-16 11:23:40 AM  
2 votes:
If the family pays property taxes in the district they seek to play in, their kids should be allowed to play. Paying any associated fees, of course. The opposition to this smacks of a general anti-homeschooling bias.
2013-02-16 11:19:26 AM  
2 votes:

Derwood: The home school families are still paying school taxes, so why not let them participate?

Seems petty


It's difficult to verify they are actually being schooled rather than being trained all day by parents who hope their kid will be the next Tim Tebow.

Issues with homeschool kids shopping for which school they want to play at.

They're not part of the school - why should they be on the school sports team.

There are enough issues with competitive sport in schools/colleges at is is without making it so schools can recruit star ringers from outside the school.

Other schools in the local league would probably be unhappy if a school they are competing against fields a team with a bunch of kids who aren't students.
2013-02-16 11:16:56 AM  
2 votes:

WhoopAssWayne: Yet homeschooling parents in Virginia will be taxed just like anyone else. Seems fair.


And then get tax deductions for homeschool expenses.

Nobody ever talks about that...
2013-02-16 11:14:04 AM  
2 votes:
I don't have kids and  a I pay school taxes. I need free beer.
2013-02-16 11:11:09 AM  
2 votes:

Derwood: The home school families are still paying school taxes, so why not let them participate?

Seems petty


The 80-year-old widow next door to me also pays school taxes. Let's make her a linebacker!
2013-02-16 04:11:37 PM  
1 votes:
So basically, on one hand you want them to socialize with others to become better members of society.

   This is the biggest strawman argument I have seen concerning home schoolers. The home schooled kids do NOT grow up in a vacuum. They tend to attend church, socialize with their neighbors and join activities outside of the home (Little League sports, etc). They are not exposed to: Peer pressure to conform, listen to music/tv their parents consider unacceptable and other influences considered bad. They tend to be more intelligent, more polite and more mature then the average public school kid.
   Non believers like to harp on how ignorant/unaccepting Christians are but I see much ignorance in these threads from them. Replacxe the word "homeschooled" or "Christian" with "gay" or "black" and see how your arguments sound


/Have known a lot of home schooled children
//How many have you known?
///Please return to your prejudice and hatred now.
2013-02-16 03:49:16 PM  
1 votes:
You have to understand that Virginia has some of the best public schools in the country. So the folks who are homeschooling their kids are all disproportionately bible thumping fundamentalists who hate evolution and sex education.
2013-02-16 02:32:49 PM  
1 votes:
I would think the privilege of playing scholastic sports would involve some kind of commitment to the school for whom you are playing... at the very least attending said school.  These parents don't want little junior learning that the earth is older than 6,000 years or have to associate with all the brown skinned kids who go there, but they for some reason think little junior has a right to play for the schools whose values they rejected.  I say the hell with them.  If they want to form a team of home schooled kids then I say fine.  The "Mommy-Daddy High School Fighting Sheltered Kids" can take the field wearing uniforms their grandmas stitched together, then coach Daddy can wipe their noses after every play while assistant coach Mommy bakes them cookies and reads the Bible to them at half time.
2013-02-16 02:20:19 PM  
1 votes:

mizchief: Banning home schoolers from playing in public schools sports is fine with me as long as the parents are made exempt from the state and local taxes and receive the federal voucher equal in what the feds spend per-child in that district. Neither side can have it both ways, if you pay you can play, otherwise you can foot the bill to start your own home school league.


So when do I get my tax discount for the war in Iraq to protect the interests of the oil industry?  Or maintenance for roads I never drive on or police and fire I never call?

More and more I am convinced that conservatives were never taught basic civics.  School taxes are not tuition.  Never have been.  We as an entire country benefit from an educated populace.  Thomas Jefferson, who hated taxes and gov't even more than today's Tea Baggers, wrote passionately on the subject.  The only thing that keeps democracy from devolving into mob rule is an educated population that has the critical thinking skills to govern wisely.  Again, we ALL benefit from this so, yes, we should all pay for it.
2013-02-16 01:16:08 PM  
1 votes:

Ringo48: Fuggin Bizzy: This is such horseshiat. You don't want your kids in public school, fine, keep them out of public school. Good job, VA.

How about we let them not pay for public school, too, then?


I'm cool with this, so long as they agree not to participate in an economy built by the world's most productive workforce as trained by America's public education system.
2013-02-16 01:10:59 PM  
1 votes:

Arctic Phoenix: In MANY states, you have to have a record book that shows the scores your child received in each class, including test papers, assignments, etc. In addition to that, home-schooled kids in many states have to take the same yearly tests as other students.

I'm inclined to be of the opinion that home-schooled kids should be allowed to participate in public school after-school activities, since the families of homeschooling parents typically DO pay taxes.. and, since these are activities by the PUBLIC school, it's irrelevant whether the kid is enrolled in that school. Caveat: I also think that, if you do home school, you should have to be registered with the public school system in order to get access to these public school amenities.

But that's just, like, my opinion, man...


I don't think academic academic eligibility can be fairly determined by a student's own parent.

And, the fact that the school is public doesn't mean it's amenities are or should be open to everyone.  Enrollment is not at all irrelevant, it's basically everything.  As a taxpaying citizen I can't use the libraries, gyms or swimming pools of public schools, because those things are built exclusively for enrolled students.  Similarly, if I'm a public school student visiting a neighboring town, I don't have a right to access the amenities of that town's public schools.
2013-02-16 12:53:05 PM  
1 votes:

Ringo48: How about we let them not pay for public school, too, then?


there are states out there that don't have a public school system. maybe they should just move to Louisiana. Then they wouldn't have to worry about their tax dollars going to things they disagree with, like teaching kids evolution.
2013-02-16 12:45:11 PM  
1 votes:
IMO, rule #1 should be that private schools should not be allowed to compete against public schools on any level, given that private schools are free to recruit and offer scholarships to talented students regardless of the geographic boundaries of public school districts.
 There are some states whose competitive sports and activities are unfairly dominated by wealthy private schools for this very reason.  The private schools should have their own, separate competitive leagues.


And home-schoolers should have every right to try out for activities within these private school leagues, but public school leagues should be for public school students.
2013-02-16 12:13:04 PM  
1 votes:

Lil' Max Meatboots: Who'stheBossisNotaFood: As an atheist who intends on homeschooling next year, I am getting a big kick out of these replies... There are many other reasons to homeschool besides religion. As a former teacher, I plan on homeschooling because the schools in my town are failing and I know that school is mostly a waste of time. That doesn't mean I am going to keep my kids locked in the house however. My one daughter has already gone to swimming and gymnastics classes and she currently attends a private preschool.

If these kids want to be on the team, why shouldn't they be allowed to try out?


As was mentioned earlier, I attended public school, I failed a class my first semester my senior year over attendance. As a result I was not allowed to run track in the spring. Sooooo...why should your kid be allowed to try out? How can you prove he passed YOUR first semester? If you want your damn kids on the team, let them go to that school.


Good point. In-school students have to keep up certain academic standards. You could pull your kid from school, make up BS academic stuff, say he passed and let him play football and get his free ride to <insert name of college you hate the most>.
2013-02-16 11:51:45 AM  
1 votes:
Play all the sports you want.
But not with public schools.
Can not has.  Not yours.
2013-02-16 11:43:36 AM  
1 votes:

Mega Steve: dv-ous: OTOH, they're usually homeschooled for reasons like OMG TEH RELIJUNZ, which makes me want to deprive them of as many things as we possibly can.

In my area, most parents of homeschooled kids are MORE educated than our local teachers. I live in the Bible belt, so take from that what you will


Please don't confuse level of education with lack of ideology.  They could all be PhD's and still be narrow minded racist a-holes, or not.
2013-02-16 11:43:28 AM  
1 votes:
As an atheist who intends on homeschooling next year, I am getting a big kick out of these replies... There are many other reasons to homeschool besides religion. As a former teacher, I plan on homeschooling because the schools in my town are failing and I know that school is mostly a waste of time. That doesn't mean I am going to keep my kids locked in the house however. My one daughter has already gone to swimming and gymnastics classes and she currently attends a private preschool.

If these kids want to be on the team, why shouldn't they be allowed to try out?
2013-02-16 11:31:14 AM  
1 votes:

dv-ous: OTOH, they're usually homeschooled for reasons like OMG TEH RELIJUNZ, which makes me want to deprive them of as many things as we possibly can.


In my area, most parents of homeschooled kids are MORE educated than our local teachers. I live in the Bible belt, so take from that what you will
2013-02-16 11:27:54 AM  
1 votes:

dv-ous: On one hand, those homeschool kids need all the reality exposure they can get. So welcome to the team.

OTOH, they're usually homeschooled for reasons like OMG TEH RELIJUNZ, which makes me want to deprive them of as many things as we possibly can.

So I'm ambivalent.


So basically, on one hand you want them to socialize with others to become better members of society.

But on the other hand, you want them to stay away from others because they believe in different things than you.

How tolerant.
2013-02-16 11:25:37 AM  
1 votes:

Ow! That was my feelings!: If the family pays property taxes in the district they seek to play in, their kids should be allowed to play. Paying any associated fees, of course. The opposition to this smacks of a general anti-homeschooling bias.


helpwerebeingoppressed.jpg
2013-02-16 11:20:54 AM  
1 votes:
Good move. You make your choices and stick with 'em.
2013-02-16 11:18:39 AM  
1 votes:

EngineerAU: Why our sports programs in the United States so tightly intertwined with schools? Even though the university level they're combined. Can't cities and towns sponsor teams and let schools stick to education?


They do, in a lot of places. My town has a booming youth soccer league that's not school-affiliated.
2013-02-16 11:17:17 AM  
1 votes:

Derwood: The home school families are still paying school taxes, so why not let them participate?

Seems petty


You don't think there is a push by them to get "reimbursed" for home schooling "expenses"?

That is their long term goal.
2013-02-16 11:14:27 AM  
1 votes:

Derwood: The home school families are still paying school taxes, so why not let them participate?

Seems petty


Very petty. If society isn't good enough for them, we're probably better off without 'em too.

Petty makes the world go round. Vietnam happened because LBJ had a big dick. Not letting some holy roller play on the football team "because fark those guys" is small potatoes.
2013-02-16 11:13:21 AM  
1 votes:

Fuggin Bizzy: Derwood: The home school families are still paying school taxes, so why not let them participate?

Seems petty

The 80-year-old widow next door to me also pays school taxes. Let's make her a linebacker!


I don't have kids and a I pay school taxes. I need free beer.
2013-02-16 11:13:14 AM  
1 votes:
If a home-school carpetbagger on a public school sports team wants to proselytize, can the coach boot him off the team, or is that discrimination?
2013-02-16 11:11:56 AM  
1 votes:
Separate but equal.  The religious nuts want separate and the liberals want equal.
2013-02-16 11:09:22 AM  
1 votes:
This is such horseshiat. You don't want your kids in public school, fine, keep them out of public school. Good job, VA.
 
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