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(Heavy)   If this 'Meteorite-Like Object' that just exploded over Cuba has any truth to it after the Russia meteorite and the other one that just missed us, Subby's going to look into bunkers   (heavy.com) divider line 288
    More: Scary, Russia  
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24416 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Feb 2013 at 6:37 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-15 06:59:24 PM  
where iphone video?
poor people in Cuba have iphones.
I know because I saw Juan of the Dead.
 
2013-02-15 07:02:00 PM  

IRQ12: beautifulbob: Thank God this didn't happen 30 years ago.  No way the nukes would have stayed on the launching pads.

Wow, that's a really good point.  Scary when you think about how close we were to a completely different world back then.


On the news this morning Neil DeGrasse Tyson said that something like this did happen like something-ish years ago and at first WAS interpreted as a nuke until they could prove that it was an asteroid and that is what prevented nuclear war.

Uh does anyone know what exactly he said because I clearly wasn't awake while I watched.
 
2013-02-15 07:02:02 PM  

vatica40: Probably fake, but just in case I think it's time we start construction on Megalith and Stonehenge.


I love this post so much
 
2013-02-15 07:03:12 PM  
jehovahs witness protection:
Major events happen about once every hundred million years. The last one was 85 million years ago, which is close enough as estimates go.

This may sound like a weird question, but have I accidentally time traveled again?  From the frame of reference I thought was in, the last major event was 66 million years ago.
 
2013-02-15 07:03:27 PM  

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: BarkingUnicorn: Gaius: Man Caves are so passé.  Real men have bunkers.

Like these real men?

[u1.ipernity.com image 479x376]

That is so gay that it wraps all the way around and is straight again.


From a page entitled, "Looking at men's underwear: Bunk bed fun," by Miss Magnolia Thunderpussy.

I think it's from a 1940s' college dorm or military induction center.
 
2013-02-15 07:03:28 PM  

SN1987a goes boom: Oh great, does this mean we'll get 3-4 new asteroid movies and a new History channel "shark week"-esque series on meteors?


I'm sure all the references to Superman and Optimus Prime will more than make up for it.
 
2013-02-15 07:03:58 PM  

davidphogan: Are we all going to die?


Eventually. But probably not today.
 
2013-02-15 07:04:48 PM  

tenpoundsofcheese: Obviously due to global warming.

CNN is making the connection.


How? How are these idiots keeping their jobs?
 
2013-02-15 07:05:18 PM  

spidermilk: IRQ12: beautifulbob: Thank God this didn't happen 30 years ago.  No way the nukes would have stayed on the launching pads.

Wow, that's a really good point.  Scary when you think about how close we were to a completely different world back then.

On the news this morning Neil DeGrasse Tyson said that something like this did happen like something-ish years ago and at first WAS interpreted as a nuke until they could prove that it was an asteroid and that is what prevented nuclear war.

Uh does anyone know what exactly he said because I clearly wasn't awake while I watched.


Nobody's completely awake when Neil is speaking.
 
2013-02-15 07:05:47 PM  
Meth Lab exploded
 
2013-02-15 07:06:12 PM  
Left, two-zero.

Add, three-zero.

Fire for effect, over.
 
2013-02-15 07:06:17 PM  

LoneVVolf: Video or it didn't happen.

 
2013-02-15 07:07:29 PM  

Mentat: If this is an alien attack, they're doing a piss-poor job of it.


Still, I would like to know more.
 
2013-02-15 07:08:25 PM  

jehovahs witness protection: Andromeda: Big meteor that fell from the sky but didn't do anything?  Meh, call me when windows shatter again.

Listen guys, tens of thousands of meteorites that are >10 grams hit the Earth every day.  Just because you didn't stop to think about it doesn't mean this is a new thing, just usually they fall over unpopulated areas like the ocean (and in normal circumstances no one would bother to search Cuban Twitter feeds for meteorite reports- this one happened before the Russia one per the article).

Don't get me wrong, I'm glad many people are learning about the dangers today and becoming more aware, but we do get hit by a lot of space rocks.

/astronomer

Major events happen about once every hundred million years. The last one was 85 million years ago, which is close enough as estimates go. Russians never had advance warning of their tiny event and there's a very good possibility astronomers won't detect the big one. We may be in for a big surprise soon.


Or we could be in for a big surprise 30 million years from now. By your own standard, that would be close enough as estimates go.
 
2013-02-15 07:08:38 PM  
KEEP WATCHING THE SKIES!
 
2013-02-15 07:11:06 PM  

spidermilk: On the news this morning Neil DeGrasse Tyson said that something like this did happen like something-ish years ago and at first WAS interpreted as a nuke until they could prove that it was an asteroid and that is what prevented nuclear war.

Uh does anyone know what exactly he said because I clearly wasn't awake while I watched.


I remember watching a space program on netflix that commented on it.  I'm kinda drunk, but what I remember is the Russians detected a nuclear radiation source from space that could have been the US launching an attack.  They kept their finger off the button long enough to figure out what it actually was(that I can't remember, but something natural from dying stars, maybe?).  At any rate, they figured out that the source came from deep space, too far away to have been sourced by humans.  I'm sure somebody else has the good details lying around.
 
2013-02-15 07:11:11 PM  
i125.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-15 07:11:17 PM  

PsiChick: SN1987a goes boom: Oh great, does this mean we'll get 3-4 new asteroid movies and a new History channel "shark week"-esque series on meteors?

Some farking FUNDING FOR PROGRAMS TO CATCH THIS SHIAT BEFORE IT HAPPENS would be nice...

/Sorry, but it was a lot more geeking-out when I hadn't just wrestled Google for hours.


Buy a telescope. Funding can always be cut to official programs. Most of these discoveries are done by amatures in the backyard. The more scopes looking up the better.

What happens when extinction is imminent from an inbound object....I think I would rather be clueless than fretting if we only had two days left to live.

Think about the crazies who would go on stabby and rapey sprees if they had nothing left to lose or two days left to live.
 
2013-02-15 07:12:53 PM  
Please oh please let a meteorite knock out all civilian GPS satellites. I would pay to see the panic and confusion from everyone as they have to use directions and maps again. Instead of blindly following a screen and a woman telling them where to go as their eyes glaze over and lips drool while they drift into your lane.


/wouldn't mind cell phones bein knocked out for a bit too
 
2013-02-15 07:14:23 PM  

Giltric: Think about the crazies who would go on stabby and rapey sprees if they had nothing left to lose or two days left to live.


I try and live my life like that.

/You just never know when it's going to be your time.
 
2013-02-15 07:15:42 PM  

SN1987a goes boom: Oh great, does this mean we'll get 3-4 new asteroid movies and a new History channel "shark week"-esque series on meteors?


It came from the sky to eat the world!

It is...

Meteorshark!

From the producers that brought you Mansquito and Piranhaconda!
 
2013-02-15 07:16:00 PM  
On the plus side, the meteorite fragments will be able to pay for the cost of repair to all the broken windows...
 
2013-02-15 07:16:06 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: Louisiana_Sitar_Club: BarkingUnicorn: Gaius: Man Caves are so passé.  Real men have bunkers.

Like these real men?

[u1.ipernity.com image 479x376]

That is so gay that it wraps all the way around and is straight again.

From a page entitled, "Looking at men's underwear: Bunk bed fun," by Miss Magnolia Thunderpussy.

I think it's from a 1940s' college dorm or military induction center.


Please tell Miss Thunderpussy that I wish to subscribe to her newsletter. Not for the quasi-homoghey pics, but so I can get e-mail from Thunderpussy.
 
2013-02-15 07:17:23 PM  
What does that even mean, subbs?
 
2013-02-15 07:17:26 PM  
Wow, those North Korean missiles might not be accurate, but they've got great range.
 
2013-02-15 07:17:39 PM  

SpaceBison: This sort of stuff happens all the time. Only nowadays we have the internet and 24 hour cable news to help blow everything out of proportion.

Boom's Source A Mystery
Holt County Independent (Nebraska), August 19, 1999


A meteoroid, a sonic boom from a jet traveling across north central Nebraska to the Lincoln area, or...? Officials from across the state are trying to determine the source of a large boom about noon Friday. In O'Neill, the boom was actually two large booms that sounded somewhat like an artillery battery being fired. Some people said they thought a piece of nearby machinery had exploded or that a vehicle had crashed. In some areas the boom was accompanied by ground shaking and even a few broken windows. Ken Reiser of Butte said immediately after he heard the noise he heard a jet in the distance and assumed it had caused a sonic boom. A sonic boom from the speed of a plane would be created as the plane pushed the air ahead of it out of the way and air rushing in behind the plane. Under that theory a plane flying across the state would create a boom as it moved but the mystery noise was heard at the same time in both Lincoln and north central Nebraska. Officials at Offutt Air Force Base near Omaha also say it is doubtful that an aircraft was to blame. An Offutt spokesman said base officials checked with the Federal Aviation Administration in Lincoln, Omaha and Minneapolis.

All of those offices said they knew of no military craft flying in the area capable of making the noise. Officials also checked with Edwards Air Force Base in California on the chance that one of its aircraft with supersonic capabilities had flown overhead. There were meteor showers over Nebraska last week and it is possible that a fragment from a meteor, which would become a meteoroid as it enters the earth's atmosphere and a meteorite if it hits the earth, could have caused the boom. Martin Gaskell, UNL professor of physics and astronomy, said a meteoroid large enough to break the ...


Really?  Hundreds of people are injured by meteors exploding in earth's atmosphere every day?  It must only happen in deepest Africa most of the time so no one says anything about it.  The one that hit Russia yesterday was fairly significant compared to the ones that "happen every day".
 
2013-02-15 07:18:16 PM  

DeathLemur: KEEP WATCHING THE SKIES!


Watch the skies, traveler.

images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-02-15 07:19:48 PM  

ladyfortuna: tenpoundsofcheese: Obviously due to global warming.

CNN is making the connection.

The creationist dude in my gaming forum said this as a joke earlier today (complete with emoticon). I weep for humanity when a 'news' channel actually brings it up.


There are definately people dumb enough to think global warming would cause something like this. Therefore, it is a fair question to ask an expert.

And "No, that idea is idiotic" is a fair response.
 
2013-02-15 07:21:15 PM  

Popcorn Johnny: Maybe I wasn't paying attention, but I just learned that the damage done in Russia was from the shock wave created when the bus sized meteor exploded 25 miles up, not from debris that hit the ground.


Not only that, but the shock wave was a *cylindrical* wave... moving at ~Mach 100, the meteor was 100 km downrange before the resulting shockwave could propagate 1 km sideways.  The result is like setting off a long line of explosives simultaneously, rather than at a point (like a bomb does).

And what's so special about that?  Energy in a cylindrically spreading wave goes down as 1/r, rather than the 1/r**2 that we're used to.  Which is the reason this thing was able to smash windows 100 km away, whereas an equivalent-release nuke (point source) wouldn't.
 
2013-02-15 07:21:32 PM  
From the bottom of the page:

Russian Politician Says Meteorite was U.S. Weapons Test

Vladimir Zhirinovsky say that the meteor shower that hit Russia this morning was really a US weapons test. The liberal leader linked the strike to John Kerry.


Well, I'm convinced. This only lends legitimacy to the site and TFA.
 
2013-02-15 07:22:06 PM  

CygnusDarius: DeathLemur: KEEP WATCHING THE SKIES!

Watch the skies, traveler.

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 290x575]




"I used to be an astronomer like you, until I took an arrow to the knee".

/Astronomy has changed...
 
2013-02-15 07:24:07 PM  

ladyfortuna: The creationist dude in my gaming forum said this as a joke earlier today (complete with emoticon). I weep for humanity when a 'news' channel actually brings it up.


...especially if the anchor who asked it still has his job the next day.

Krieghund: There are definately people dumb enough to think global warming would cause something like this. Therefore, it is a fair question to ask an expert.


I'd prefer we don't dignify such an idea as a coherent thought.
 
2013-02-15 07:25:29 PM  
The Russia meteor was a bit bigger than I thought it'd be...

Preliminary information indicates that a meteor in Chelyabinsk, Russia, is not related to asteroid 2012 DA14, which is flying by Earth safely today. The Russia meteor is the largest reported since 1908, when a meteor hit Tunguska, Siberia. The meteor entered the atmosphere at about 40,000 mph (18 kilometers per second). The impact time was 7:20:26 p.m. PST, or 10:20:26 p.m. EST on Feb. 14 (3:20:26 UTC on Feb. 15), and the energy released by the impact was in the hundreds of kilotons. Based on the duration of the event, it was a very shallow entry. It was larger than the meteor over Indonesia on Oct. 8, 2009. Measurements are still coming in, and a more precise measure of the energy may be available later. The size of the object before hitting the atmosphere was about 49 feet (15 meters) and had a mass of about 7,000 tons. The meteor, which was about one-third the diameter of asteroid 2012 DA14, was brighter than the sun. Its trail was visible for about 30 seconds, so it was a grazing impact through the atmosphere. It is important to note that this estimate is preliminary, and may be revised as more data is obtained.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/asteroids/news/asteroid20130215.ht ml
 
2013-02-15 07:25:41 PM  

ArtosRC: Mentat: If this is an alien attack, they're doing a piss-poor job of it.

Card had it right. The aliens throw rocks.


Then these aliens must be the intergalactic equivalent of the Royals bullpen, because they can't hit shiat.
 
2013-02-15 07:26:47 PM  

Andromeda: Big meteor that fell from the sky but didn't do anything?  Meh, call me when windows shatter again.

Listen guys, tens of thousands of meteorites that are >10 grams hit the Earth every day.  Just because you didn't stop to think about it doesn't mean this is a new thing, just usually they fall over unpopulated areas like the ocean (and in normal circumstances no one would bother to search Cuban Twitter feeds for meteorite reports- this one happened before the Russia one per the article).

Don't get me wrong, I'm glad many people are learning about the dangers today and becoming more aware, but we do get hit by a lot of space rocks.

/astronomer


Plus a lot of Poop bags from the space station. Seriously, Chris Hadfield told me so.
 
2013-02-15 07:27:02 PM  

PsiChick: SN1987a goes boom: Oh great, does this mean we'll get 3-4 new asteroid movies and a new History channel "shark week"-esque series on meteors?

Some farking FUNDING FOR PROGRAMS TO CATCH THIS SHIAT BEFORE IT HAPPENS would be nice...

/Sorry, but it was a lot more geeking-out when I hadn't just wrestled Google for hours.


It's a bigass sky, sir.
 
2013-02-15 07:27:13 PM  
It was the ghost of Che coming back to earth in preparation for Fidel's departure.
 
2013-02-15 07:27:14 PM  

vatica40: Probably fake, but just in case I think it's time we start construction on Megalith and Stonehenge.


What, no love for the Arkbird?  It would handle smaller fragments nicely..
 
2013-02-15 07:28:05 PM  

beautifulbob: Thank God this didn't happen 30 years ago.  No way the nukes would have stayed on the launching pads.


it wouldn't have.

cause of teh gay
 
2013-02-15 07:31:40 PM  
this_story = (pics? cool : fake);
 
2013-02-15 07:31:41 PM  

eyeq360: SN1987a goes boom: Oh great, does this mean we'll get 3-4 new asteroid movies and a new History channel "shark week"-esque series on meteors?

Then we go into supervolcanoes and the San Andreas fault.


A relatively modest asteroid impact in US Great Plains area sets off the Yellowstone Supervolcano. . .the resulting seismic activity is just enough to make the San Andreas fault finally snap and send LA into the Pacific ocean right as the Supervolcano is thrusting Earth into a new ice age (and taking out a good chunk of the Continental US in the blast).

Some hack in LA is already writing it, I'm sure.
 
2013-02-15 07:31:45 PM  

Popcorn Johnny: Maybe I wasn't paying attention, but I just learned that the damage done in Russia was from the shock wave created when the bus sized meteor exploded 25 miles up, not from debris that hit the ground.


That's what put it into perspective for me.  Imagine if it came down fairly intact into something.  It also amazed me how bright it was.  Looked like someone was welding.
 
2013-02-15 07:35:44 PM  

The Shoveller: jehovahs witness protection:

Major events happen about once every hundred million years. The last one was 85 million years ago, which is close enough as estimates go. Russians never had advance warning of their tiny event and there's a very good possibility astronomers won't detect the big one. We may be in for a big surprise soon.

The average time between impacts is not a useful predictor of what may lay ahead (by definition, an average only takes into account events that have already occurred). The event to which I think you're referring (the Yucatan impact that probably played a part in the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs, among many other taxa) occurred  ~65 million years ago. There have been many impacts since that time, some of which have left significant scars on the planet's surface.

Your point that we are still unable to do anything about oncoming bolides is well taken: we need to work out a way to protect ourselves (Bruce Willis isn't going to live forever).



I like to use the phrase "the dice have no memory" when I explain that. For a big impact it could be tomorrow, could be 15 million years from now. And if one happens tomorrow, then the next day it...... still could be another one hitting tomorrow, or could be 15 million years... When you roll a 6-sided die you've got a 1 in 6 chance of a given number coming up. The next time you roll it it isn't a 1 in 36 chance, it's still a 1 in 6 chance. The dice don't remember previous rolls.

It's not really a chance though, those objects are either out there or not. But we don't really know about them all, so for us we see it for now in terms of chance. Until we actually find and catalog all the objects in the solar system - and have a system actively tracking any new ones that are perturbed or something - we're pretty much just keeping our fingers crossed that no significant impacts affect us.
 
2013-02-15 07:37:24 PM  

way south: CygnusDarius: DeathLemur: KEEP WATCHING THE SKIES!

Watch the skies, traveler.

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 290x575]

"I used to be an astronomer like you, until I took an arrow to the knee".

/Astronomy has changed...


You see those astronomers from Hammerfell? They have curved telescopes.... Curved. Telescopes.
 
2013-02-15 07:37:44 PM  
That meteor hit Russia so hard that trolls started falling out of the internet.
 
2013-02-15 07:37:45 PM  

lousyskater: Tunguska, Siberia


Came to mention this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_event
 
2013-02-15 07:38:04 PM  
y'all so dumb ain't no aliens til they take out Buenos Aires
 
2013-02-15 07:38:28 PM  
Great!  And here I am on a flight from Toronto to DFW.  I'll keep my eyes open out the window and report back later if I see anything.

/Birds-eye view
//GoGo Inflight is greatness
 
2013-02-15 07:38:43 PM  

Anglachel: It also amazed me how bright it was.  Looked like someone was welding.


It was basically like looking at a nuclear weapon go off, as it released about as much energy as a small one. Estimated in the hundreds of kilotons, it released 10x more energy than the Little Boy atomic bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima. It's a good thing it came in shallow, otherwise it might have wiped out a town/city.
 
2013-02-15 07:39:01 PM  

Scruffinator: spidermilk: On the news this morning Neil DeGrasse Tyson said that something like this did happen like something-ish years ago and at first WAS interpreted as a nuke until they could prove that it was an asteroid and that is what prevented nuclear war.

Uh does anyone know what exactly he said because I clearly wasn't awake while I watched.

I remember watching a space program on netflix that commented on it.  I'm kinda drunk, but what I remember is the Russians detected a nuclear radiation source from space that could have been the US launching an attack.  They kept their finger off the button long enough to figure out what it actually was(that I can't remember, but something natural from dying stars, maybe?).  At any rate, they figured out that the source came from deep space, too far away to have been sourced by humans.  I'm sure somebody else has the good details lying around.


I think it was the sun. It hit their sensors somehow that made their alarms go off and make them think an attack had been launched. It gave one false alarm, then another, then another and so on. I don't recall how many total. But the Soviet in charge thought it was weird, because the US wouldn't launch a handful of nukes in a strike like that, they would launch everything they had, so he held off on retaliating. IIRC, he held off in spite of being ordered to take action by his superiors but I could be wrong.
 
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