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(Universe Today)   Watch Live as Asteroid 2012 DA14 Whizzes Past Earth   (universetoday.com) divider line 139
    More: Cool, Earth, geosynchronous satellite, NASA TV, asteroids, live view, ccd camera, astronomy, telescopes  
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8445 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Feb 2013 at 2:42 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-15 10:16:41 AM
Doesn't seem like all of it is missing...
 
2013-02-15 10:20:33 AM
www.redorbit.com

static.ddmcdn.com

www.dlr.de
 
2013-02-15 10:27:40 AM
My guess is part of it hit Russia this morning.
 
2013-02-15 10:28:40 AM
Make sure you watch this live webcast from underground somewhere. I'm looking at you eastern Asia!
 
2013-02-15 10:31:11 AM
Release the gundams!
 
2013-02-15 10:33:25 AM
its gonna hit Oklahoma.
 
2013-02-15 10:33:36 AM
Holy shiat! It's heading straight at us, and it doesn't look happy!

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-02-15 10:44:57 AM
Does anyone know if it will be visible in the sky on the east coast?
 
2013-02-15 10:56:11 AM
According to NASA, the Russian meteor and the asteroid are not related. They were traveling in opposite directions.
 
2013-02-15 10:59:19 AM

Ham Sandvich: Does anyone know if it will be visible in the sky on the east coast?


From Bad astronomy

OK, so here's how you can watch online. Mind you, even in the biggest telescopes, 2012 DA14 will only be a dot (even Hubble would only see it as a couple of pixels across), so don't expect Hollywood-type footage here. But still, this'll be pretty cool.

So I'm guess it won't be visible to the naked eye
 
2013-02-15 11:00:01 AM
Am I on the right stream?  Some dude talking about Juno?
 
2013-02-15 11:01:39 AM

bob_ross: Am I on the right stream?  Some dude talking about Juno?


According to TFA, a lot of the don't start until 2pm EST
 
2013-02-15 11:02:34 AM

Ham Sandvich: Does anyone know if it will be visible in the sky on the east coast?


Its closest approach is a little after 2:00 PM Eastern time, and that will be over the Indian Ocean. Even for those on the right side of the planet to see it, it will be too dim for the naked eye (7th or 8th magnitude).  By the time North America rotates around far enough to see it, it will be down to 12th magnitude, which is a stretch even for most backyard telescopes.
 
2013-02-15 11:06:54 AM
Crank up the paranoia machine.

www.seekwellness.com
 
2013-02-15 11:13:00 AM
Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use
 
2013-02-15 11:57:01 AM

tuffsnake: Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use


Moon would be an easier, cheaper and safer place to do that, at least if it's true we already went there 60 years ago.
 
2013-02-15 12:16:25 PM

J. Frank Parnell: tuffsnake: Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use

Moon would be an easier, cheaper and safer place to do that, at least if it's true we already went there 60 years ago.


I feel I should point out that, if the moon's orbital path were to undergo any serious alteration, all life on Earth would be extinguished. You can't just start messing with that crucial of an element, in a system like this, without serious repercussions - and the gravity from the Moon has been a long-time element of our ecosystem.

No, I think the safer bet is probably asteroids. And besides that, there are more of them. Fark the moon, it should be a tourist trap, at best.
 
2013-02-15 12:17:13 PM

GardenWeasel: According to NASA, the Russian meteor and the asteroid are not related. They were traveling in opposite directions.

i.imgur.com


Star-crossed lovers?
 
2013-02-15 12:29:19 PM
Whizzes Past Earth

F*cking pussy. Come on, hit us!
 
2013-02-15 12:34:16 PM
well according to that animation we should be fine and tv and the internet would never lie
 
2013-02-15 12:34:52 PM

jars.traptone: J. Frank Parnell: tuffsnake: Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use

Moon would be an easier, cheaper and safer place to do that, at least if it's true we already went there 60 years ago.

I feel I should point out that, if the moon's orbital path were to undergo any serious alteration, all life on Earth would be extinguished. You can't just start messing with that crucial of an element, in a system like this, without serious repercussions - and the gravity from the Moon has been a long-time element of our ecosystem.

No, I think the safer bet is probably asteroids. And besides that, there are more of them. Fark the moon, it should be a tourist trap, at best.


Why would mining operations effect the Moon's orbit? Do you honestly think we'd ever be able to mine a sufficient mass from the moon to alter its gravity field?
 
2013-02-15 12:35:03 PM

jars.traptone: I feel I should point out that, if the moon's orbital path were to undergo any serious alteration, all life on Earth would be extinguished. You can't just start messing with that crucial of an element, in a system like this, without serious repercussions - and the gravity from the Moon has been a long-time element of our ecosystem.


You may as well be saying that by mining minerals on Earth, and building spacecraft out of them to send into space we're somehow screwing up the mass of the planet and dooming ourselves.

In a thousand years we probably couldn't mine as much as the average meteor or comet impact takes away from the moon. Even on a small moon what we take away would have a negligible effect, and our moon is the largest moon we've found anywhere by a wide margin.
 
2013-02-15 12:42:02 PM
Watching Chris Hadfield Q&A now. Interesting.
 
2013-02-15 12:42:50 PM

tuffsnake: Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use


First, it's likely just a chunk of pretty ordinary rock.  Metallic objects might have some valuable stuff in them, but most of the things up there are just rocks.

Second, capturing something that size into Earth orbit is not easy.  At its closest approach, you'd need to slow it down by about 12,000 miles per hour to get it into a circular orbit (I think; I didn't check my homework very carefully on this).  It's somewhere in the 200,000 ton ballpark, so that's a bit of a deal.  There are two companies with plans to do that sort of thing someday, but those plans start with much smaller targets.
 
2013-02-15 12:52:59 PM
We got graphics up!
 
2013-02-15 12:57:38 PM
Already saw footage of a chink of it hitting Russia. When NASA said it wouldn't hit us, they meant it wouldn't hit the U.S.
 
2013-02-15 01:07:21 PM
Well, that was not interesting. Could a science chick with big boobs explain how this is important?
 
2013-02-15 01:08:29 PM

uncoveror: Already saw footage of a chink of it hitting Russia. When NASA said it wouldn't hit us, they meant it wouldn't hit the U.S.


No, you didn't. That was going a different direction. Completely different origin. Stuff falls on Earth every day, that one just happened to be seen because of size and location.
 
2013-02-15 01:09:17 PM
Stolen image:


eauque.com
 
2013-02-15 01:09:41 PM
This is God's warning shot. Take heed.
 
2013-02-15 01:09:46 PM
I just found out that my asteroid insurance is only valid if my house is in outer space when struck.

Thanks, Obama.
 
2013-02-15 01:10:59 PM

jars.traptone: J. Frank Parnell: tuffsnake: Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use

Moon would be an easier, cheaper and safer place to do that, at least if it's true we already went there 60 years ago.

I feel I should point out that, if the moon's orbital path were to undergo any serious alteration, all life on Earth would be extinguished. You can't just start messing with that crucial of an element, in a system like this, without serious repercussions - and the gravity from the Moon has been a long-time element of our ecosystem.

No, I think the safer bet is probably asteroids. And besides that, there are more of them. Fark the moon, it should be a tourist trap, at best.


Perhaps you underestimate just how huge the moon is. We couldn't affect if it we tried.
 
2013-02-15 01:15:17 PM
Did they just say anti-matter?
 
2013-02-15 01:16:01 PM

tuffsnake: Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use


We didn't find it soon enough.
 
2013-02-15 01:17:37 PM
www.alicia-logic.com

Stop trying to hit me, and hit me!
 
2013-02-15 01:23:27 PM

AppleChill: [www.alicia-logic.com image 357x183]

Stop trying to hit me, and hit me!


Do you think that's vacuum you are breathing?
 
2013-02-15 01:26:12 PM
the link isn't working. :(
 
2013-02-15 01:26:43 PM
I'm curious if there are any other little fragmentations that we might get to meet live in the next few hours.
 
2013-02-15 01:27:21 PM
images3.cliqueclack.com 

Skyfrog: jars.traptone: J. Frank Parnell: tuffsnake: Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use

Moon would be an easier, cheaper and safer place to do that, at least if it's true we already went there 60 years ago.

I feel I should point out that, if the moon's orbital path were to undergo any serious alteration, all life on Earth would be extinguished. You can't just start messing with that crucial of an element, in a system like this, without serious repercussions - and the gravity from the Moon has been a long-time element of our ecosystem.

No, I think the safer bet is probably asteroids. And besides that, there are more of them. Fark the moon, it should be a tourist trap, at best.

Perhaps you underestimate just how huge the moon is. We couldn't affect if it we tried.

 
2013-02-15 01:27:43 PM
I'm getting an ice cream scooper so I can grab a chunk of that rock as it goes over!
 
2013-02-15 01:28:01 PM
God's a lousy bowler, apparently.
 
2013-02-15 01:29:43 PM

J. Frank Parnell: if it's true we already went there 60 years ago.


60 years ago?  That would be something, indeed....  :D
 
2013-02-15 01:29:45 PM

Gwendolyn: the link isn't working. :(


I've been watching NASA TV, but it looks like their live commentary won't start for a half hour.
 
2013-02-15 01:31:29 PM

Gwendolyn: the link isn't working. :(


works fine for me
 
2013-02-15 01:33:26 PM

elvisaintdead: J. Frank Parnell: if it's true we already went there 60 years ago.

60 years ago?  That would be something, indeed....  :D


Heh, quite. 44 years.

/this is why i can't be trusted with math
 
2013-02-15 01:33:33 PM

katerbug72: Watching Chris Hadfield Q&A now. Interesting.


His tweets are always so awesome.
 
2013-02-15 01:35:10 PM

jars.traptone: J. Frank Parnell: tuffsnake: Why don't we try and catch it? THere's probably some metals/minerals/whathaveyou in it that we could use

Moon would be an easier, cheaper and safer place to do that, at least if it's true we already went there 60 years ago.

I feel I should point out that, if the moon's orbital path were to undergo any serious alteration, all life on Earth would be extinguished. You can't just start messing with that crucial of an element, in a system like this, without serious repercussions - and the gravity from the Moon has been a long-time element of our ecosystem.

No, I think the safer bet is probably asteroids. And besides that, there are more of them. Fark the moon, it should be a tourist trap, at best.


does an elephant notice the blood a gnat or mosiqto has sucked from it's body?
 
2013-02-15 01:37:21 PM

J. Frank Parnell: jars.traptone: I feel I should point out that, if the moon's orbital path were to undergo any serious alteration, all life on Earth would be extinguished. You can't just start messing with that crucial of an element, in a system like this, without serious repercussions - and the gravity from the Moon has been a long-time element of our ecosystem.

You may as well be saying that by mining minerals on Earth, and building spacecraft out of them to send into space we're somehow screwing up the mass of the planet and dooming ourselves.

In a thousand years we probably couldn't mine as much as the average meteor or comet impact takes away from the moon. Even on a small moon what we take away would have a negligible effect, and our moon is the largest moon we've found anywhere by a wide margin.


Ganymede, Callisto, Titan, and Io would like a word with you. (Unless you were referring to ratio of size of moon relative to size of planet ― then Charon would like a word with you.)
 
2013-02-15 01:42:21 PM
Got it. Thank you!
 
2013-02-15 01:43:57 PM
Clearly there's a super advanced race chucking shiat at us. They threw the big one as a distraction just to show us they can nail us whenever they want to and there's not a damn thing we can do about it.
 
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