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(The New York Times)   NYT journalist gives his side of the Tesla S story. Jeremy Clarkson smiling, stroking cat   (wheels.blogs.nytimes.com) divider line 239
    More: Followup, NYT, Model S, detour, New Jersey Turnpike, cats, journalists, Lincoln Tunnel, Elon Musk  
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15386 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Feb 2013 at 12:44 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-14 01:33:33 PM

gweilo8888: MadCat: The logs that Tesla released directly contradict statements made by the reporter. Cue NYT Reporter accusing Tesla of falsifying data...

Does it? Because frankly, I see periods of speeds not terribly dissimilar to what the journo claimed. In fact, similar and consistent enough that if anything, I'd guess the speedo is off on the car, and the journo was exceeding the speed he believed himself to be driving due to a hopelessly inaccurate speedo. (In other words, a speedo like pretty much every car I've ever driven -- few have ever come within 5mph of accurate while driving at 55mph for me, showing readings anywhere from sub-50 to over-60.


That would relevant and interesting if car speedometers didn't tend read higher then your actual speed, to keep liability in speeding as a relative non-issue. If we apply the 'innacurate speedo' claim here we would have to assume that the speedo showed him 65 when he was actually traveling 60 and he claimed 54.
 
2013-02-14 01:33:52 PM

T.M.S.: I can say from a great deal of personal experience that the NY Times is full of shiat and has absolutely no interest in publishing the truth.


please, share
 
2013-02-14 01:34:36 PM

RexTalionis: Also, I think the most damning thing about this test drive comes from Musk's blog:

"When he first reached our Milford, Connecticut Supercharger, having driven the car hard and after taking an unplanned detour through downtown Manhattan to give his brother a ride, the display said "0 miles remaining." Instead of plugging in the car, he drove in circles for over half a mile in a tiny, 100-space parking lot. When the Model S valiantly refused to die, he eventually plugged it in."


But by "driving in circles" what Elon meant was  "he drove 0.5 miles in 5 minutes around a parking lot searching for a charging port or a free spot."
 
2013-02-14 01:34:42 PM
In the periods he said he used cruise control, the data seems to show him using cruise control.  The "lie" seems to be that the data just show it being about 5mph higher than the article, which seems well within expected variation.

The key thing from the data for me is the graph that shows displayed remaining charge miles vs. actual miles traveled.  It looks like the displayed rating was consistently 30% over the actual achieved miles. Which seems like the basic claim the author was making.  The big overnight charge loss is supported in this graph as well; which I guess means that a trickle charge is pretty much required.
 
2013-02-14 01:35:32 PM
And why do the logs not show his battery charge below zero in milford either?
 
2013-02-14 01:35:37 PM
These two should just get a room and fark already.
 
2013-02-14 01:36:51 PM

gweilo8888: ringersol: But does that sound remotely plausible?  A maker of electric cars saying "Adding stop-and-go traffic to your trip will *improve* your total range"?
The only person claiming they got that advice is the author whose story was just gutted by the actual trip data.
Are we really supposed to take him at his word on this?

Frankly, yes, it does. When was the last time you spoke to a call center and got a *knowledgeable* employee? And when was the last time the call center staff member had a salary that would let them drive a US$100,000 car, to give them any personal experience to counter their lousy intuition and guesswork as to how the product operates?

So yes, it sounds more than plausible. Most likely the support droid was asked a question that wasn't covered by the handbook that is the only "knowledge" they have of a vehicle they've probably never even seen in person, or they simply forgot the handbook answer, and either way incorrect info was fed out.


You're both dumbasses. It's called "regenerative braking" an it's been around since the first hybrids and the idea is that a car in motion has some measurable inertia and to use the brakes as a capture device for that energy. I'm no physicist, and I have my doubts about the efficiency of such a thing given our current technology, but I have no doubt it's possible and even beneficial and can extend the range of an electric car by a couple miles, if not more. Here, why don't you go learn something:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regenerative_brake
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-parts/brakes/brake-types/regenera ti ve-braking.htm
http://green.autoblog.com/2009/04/16/greenlings-what-is-regenerative -b raking-and-what-types-are-ther/

There's even a youtube video for the spectacularly ignorant:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8jRAwIzPTM

Oh what the hell, here's more links:

http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-regenerative-braking.htm
http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/hybridanimation/fullhybrid/fullhybrid br aking.html

From Tesla themselves:

http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/magic-tesla-roadster-regenerative-br ak ing

They even call it magic.  So yeah, you two are idiots.
 
2013-02-14 01:37:13 PM

Popcorn Johnny: kalor: Hard raw data, un-manipulated, shows the reporter statement is false...that does prove who made the lying statement.

So tell me, how do you know it's un-manipulated?


Last I heard, Tesla was not gong to release the raw data.

Tesla also claims the car was never fully discharged. The flatbed driver disagrees:
http://jalopnik.com/towing-company-the-nyt-tesla-model-s-was-dead-wh en -it-196100064
 
2013-02-14 01:37:16 PM

RexTalionis: [www.teslamotors.com image 616x464]


Interesting that the reporter's report is always 5mph less than the graph. Almost as if there's a systematic error.
 
2013-02-14 01:39:30 PM
BTW, I own an EV, and it's terrible range-wise in cold weather. The charging is slower and much less efficient, so you don't get the range you were hoping for on a standard overnight charge.
 
2013-02-14 01:39:33 PM
I believe that Top Gear is going to test the Tesla in next week's show.  I'll definitely be watching now.
 
2013-02-14 01:39:53 PM

DaAlien: Tesla also claims the car was never fully discharged. The flatbed driver disagrees:
http://jalopnik.com/towing-company-the-nyt-tesla-model-s-was-dead-wh en -it-196100064


The plot thickens.
 
2013-02-14 01:40:42 PM

RexTalionis: orbister: RexTalionis: I'm confused. He thinks stop and go will actually use less power than simply cruising at speed? Even with battery regeneration from braking, did he think that he's not expending more power having to accelerate a car from zero to whatever than he will get back through regeneration?

Slow speed driving uses less energy than high speed driving. Even with stop-and-go, I'd expect two miles in city traffic to use less energy than two miles at motorway speeds.

You know why your car's "city" mpg rating is almost always lower than your "highway" rating?


If you're talking about a combustion engine car, yes. In a full electric, nope - city driving gives about 30% more range. In stop and go, or streetlight to streetlight traffic, a vast majority of the energy to move an electric car is road friction and the energy required to accelerate. As others have pointed out, electric cars also regain much of that energy when braking. In comparison, a combustion car has a lot of parasitic loss at lower speeds (cooling pumps, alternators, drive belts, etc), and far less combustion efficiency. As you get past ~30mph, wind resistance becomes stronger and stronger. That is what reduces range on electric cars.

Tesla's range vs. speed charts:
4.bp.blogspot.com

The EPA MPG of a 2013 Nissan Leaf
sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net
/if it's too small for you to read, 130 MPGe city/ 102 MPGe highway
 
2013-02-14 01:42:52 PM

RexTalionis: I'm confused. He thinks stop and go will actually use less power than simply cruising at speed? Even with battery regeneration from braking, did he think that he's not expending more power having to accelerate a car from zero to whatever than he will get back through regeneration?


Came for this essentially.

"She said to shut off the cruise control to take advantage of battery regeneration from occasional braking and slowing down. Based on that advice, I was under the impression that stop-and-go driving at low speeds in the city would help, not hurt, my mileage. "

Which confirms that people go into things like Journalism, theater, etc because they are utterly stupid and cannot survive in any other "profession" in the world.
 
2013-02-14 01:43:14 PM

RexTalionis: Also, I think the most damning thing about this test drive comes from Musk's blog:

"When he first reached our Milford, Connecticut Supercharger, having driven the car hard and after taking an unplanned detour through downtown Manhattan to give his brother a ride, the display said "0 miles remaining." Instead of plugging in the car, he drove in circles for over half a mile in a tiny, 100-space parking lot. When the Model S valiantly refused to die, he eventually plugged it in."


No, the most damning part is that he got to the last recharge station and only charged it enough to get halfway to his final destination.  On what planet do you say, "I need to go 60 miles, 30 miles worth of fuel ought to get me there"?

The circles in the parking lot could have been him looking for a spot, the temperature and speedometer readings were off, but not by that much.  Not adding enough fuel to make it where you're going and then blaming the car is idiotic.
 
2013-02-14 01:43:16 PM

RexTalionis: You know why your car's "city" mpg rating is almost always lower than your "highway" rating?


Because I don't have regenerative braking, and because I drive an internal combustion engine which, unlike an electric car, uses a non-negligible amount of energy even when stopped in traffic.
 
2013-02-14 01:44:25 PM

Great Janitor: Jeremy Clarkson is probably my favorite reality show person and I love everything he says and does on Top Gear.  Last time I bought a car I treated each test drive as if I were Jeremy Clarkson doing something on Top Gear.  There are many used car salesmen who hate me.


There's no way I'd buy a car from someone who wouldn't let me drive it like I'm Jeremy Clarkson.  Is there something wrong with the it that they are trying to hide?  If there's not, it should do 0-60 pretty close to what its published time is.
 
2013-02-14 01:46:11 PM
fluffy2097: "horrifically enough, that's exactly how lots of people drive. "

For the sake of argument, let's grant that numerous such people exist.  I get in trouble for under-estimating the stupidity of people often enough, so you may well be right about that.
But such people would never get anywhere in any car ever invented.  So what exactly would be the point of even doing the test at that point?
The inevitable result of driving that way is "out of fuel."  You don't have to leave your easy chair to write that review.  You don't even have to know what vehicle is being tested.
 
2013-02-14 01:46:23 PM
Man On A Mission: (quoting someone else)  Any halfway experienced electric car driver can spot several mistakes that Broder made

This reinforces my suspicion that Tesla owners and iDevice owners are basically the same sort of people, responding to any criticism of their purchase with (a) you did it wrong and (b) you shouldn't want to do that anyway.
 
2013-02-14 01:46:55 PM
The speeding, the driving around in circles, the putting the heat up, the detour even the not charging it overnight - no one cares, because that's pretty normal driving behaviour for your average person (even though the reporter wasn't truthful about those aspects).

No, the problem was he unplugged the vehicle when it said 32mi of charge left to go on a 62mi trip, driving for over 20mi on 'empty', past other recharge stations. That's a sign he wanted the car to fail, quite deliberately.
 
2013-02-14 01:47:06 PM
This is an interesting one. The Journo may have either made mistakes or may have wildly fudged his account. All Tesla had to do was shrug, release his data and simply say, this car obviously "has a practical application in todays driving world with some caveats".

The debate would then be about the severity or insignificance of those caveats. It irritated me that other Tesla owners joined the fray frothing at the mouth berating what could well have been an ideal test; A layman without specialised foreknowledge of the product who would simulate real world scenarios.

Musk went into the hyperbole like a teenage girl claiming a teacher attempted predatory antics after an inadvertent hug when winning a championship game. Take his Milford Supercharger rebuttal for instance.

Furthermore, having worked in an industry that primarily revolved against remote sensing, telemetry etc. and the wild data quality variations that occur without proper vetting, this whole flap has me curious about Teslas data chain from source.

Has anyone seriously vetted Tesla's telemetry setup? Protesting too hard against the NYT journo could easily open a discussion in that direction.

I liked Jalopniks coverage on the whole thing.
 
2013-02-14 01:48:32 PM

noitsnot: I kind of figured that was just circling to get a spot - as most folks that live in big cities have to do.  The spots are always all full, and you gotta circle (with a bunch of other vultures) to get a spot when one opens.


Then why wouldn't the article author admit to doing that instead of blatantly lying and saying he wasn't even in a parking lot?
 
2013-02-14 01:49:17 PM

DaAlien: Tesla also claims the car was never fully discharged.


It may never have been fully discharged. The Roadster shuts down completely at 5 or 10% charge to avoid battery damage. Anyone know if the Model S shows charge or usable charge remaining?
 
2013-02-14 01:51:27 PM

gweilo8888: MadCat: The logs that Tesla released directly contradict statements made by the reporter. Cue NYT Reporter accusing Tesla of falsifying data...

Does it? Because frankly, I see periods of speeds not terribly dissimilar to what the journo claimed. In fact, similar and consistent enough that if anything, I'd guess the speedo is off on the car, and the journo was exceeding the speed he believed himself to be driving due to a hopelessly inaccurate speedo. (In other words, a speedo like pretty much every car I've ever driven -- few have ever come within 5mph of accurate while driving at 55mph for me, showing readings anywhere from sub-50 to over-60.


So you are saying the logs and the speed indicated on the speedometer are from different sources of data?  If the car's computer was capable of knowing and logging the actual speed why wouldn't that same data stream go to the speedometer as well?

While your point of speedometers often not indicating actual speed is probably correct, your conclusion is incongruous with the facts as we know them.
 
2013-02-14 01:51:29 PM
Broder is just digging his hole deeper.  But there's no one to take his shovel away.
 
2013-02-14 01:53:58 PM

themanuf: So you are saying the logs and the speed indicated on the speedometer are from different sources of data?


It's theoretically possible that the logs are based off the GPS data, rather than the speedometer data.
 
2013-02-14 01:54:22 PM

themanuf: So you are saying the logs and the speed indicated on the speedometer are from different sources of data? If the car's computer was capable of knowing and logging the actual speed why wouldn't that same data stream go to the speedometer as well?


Because data logging is done via GPS tracking whereas speedometer readings are based off rotations of the wheels, which is something that varies depending on the diameter of the wheels you have.

/Has a GPS in his car
//Dash speedo is not connected to GPS speedo.
 
2013-02-14 01:57:55 PM

fluffy2097: themanuf: So you are saying the logs and the speed indicated on the speedometer are from different sources of data? If the car's computer was capable of knowing and logging the actual speed why wouldn't that same data stream go to the speedometer as well?

Because data logging is can be done via GPS tracking whereas speedometer readings are based off rotations of the wheels, which is something that varies depending on the diameter of the wheels you have.


FTFY. We have no way of knowing whether the data logging was GPS data or speedometer data or both. Since it's a digital speedometer, the log could theoretically capture it.
Additionally, while you're correct about the speedometer readings being based of wheel rotation and size, one would expect a car on loan from the manufacturer would have the correct size wheels for its configuration data.
 
2013-02-14 01:58:00 PM
Why on earth is the NYT still letting him publish under their name?  This asshole is an obvious shill who lacks any kind of journalistic integrity.  Fire his ass, NYT.  There are literally tens of thousands of unemployed journalism majors who would happily do a much better job than he ever could.
 
2013-02-14 01:58:02 PM

Asterix: This is an interesting one. The Journo may have either made mistakes or may have wildly fudged his account. All Tesla had to do was shrug, release his data and simply say, this car obviously "has a practical application in todays driving world with some caveats".

The debate would then be about the severity or insignificance of those caveats. It irritated me that other Tesla owners joined the fray frothing at the mouth berating what could well have been an ideal test; A layman without specialised foreknowledge of the product who would simulate real world scenarios.

Musk went into the hyperbole like a teenage girl claiming a teacher attempted predatory antics after an inadvertent hug when winning a championship game. Take his Milford Supercharger rebuttal for instance.

Furthermore, having worked in an industry that primarily revolved against remote sensing, telemetry etc. and the wild data quality variations that occur without proper vetting, this whole flap has me curious about Teslas data chain from source.

Has anyone seriously vetted Tesla's telemetry setup? Protesting too hard against the NYT journo could easily open a discussion in that direction.

I liked Jalopniks coverage on the whole thing.



I would think the telemetry is a bit more accurate than "well, I'm pretty sure I never drove over 60".  Humans are god awful at estimating what they were doing with precision.
 
2013-02-14 01:59:00 PM
I once ran out of gas, after I left my house with a gallon of gas in the tank, and tried to drive across the state.  How could this have happened to me?!
 
2013-02-14 01:59:58 PM

HMS_Blinkin: Why on earth is the NYT still letting him publish under their name?  This asshole is an obvious shill who lacks any kind of journalistic integrity.  Fire his ass, NYT.  There are literally tens of thousands of unemployed journalism majors who would happily do a much better job than he ever could.


(i) Because libel laws are  heavily slanted towards protecting the media.
(ii) Because if Musk can't actually prove that the shill lied, the NYT could argue that his credibility is increased and it's Tesla's that is diminished.
 
2013-02-14 02:00:57 PM

Desquamation: Tesla has released their logs:

http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/most-peculiar-test-drive


That's why this Broder idiot needs to stop fighting his false reporting.  He needs to own up to his lies, or slink away quietly.  He can't win.  Tesla has farking computer data that tells them exactly what the car was doing for the whole test drive.
 
2013-02-14 02:02:16 PM

Theaetetus: themanuf: So you are saying the logs and the speed indicated on the speedometer are from different sources of data?

It's theoretically possible that the logs are based off the GPS data, rather than the speedometer data.



Given the length of the drive, the GPS data should be quite accurate.  My GPS speed is always within 1 mph of my speedometer's.  Nowadays a lot of media and enthusiasts do their road performance timing using GPS devices.

When out in the open, a modern GPS with views of several satellites is extremely accurate.
 
2013-02-14 02:02:33 PM

Theaetetus: one would expect a car on loan from the manufacturer would have the correct size wheels for its configuration data.


I expect it to be within 5mph +/-

The data discrepancy shows about 7-10 mph, but you've got that +/- 5mph on both tracking devices (Remember, civilian GPS is only accurate to a few meters we don't get milspec 2" accurate GPS).

methinks Elon doth protest to much.
 
2013-02-14 02:02:48 PM

Theaetetus: (ii) Because if Musk can't actually prove that the shill lied, the NYT could argue that his credibility is increased and it's Tesla's that is diminished.


Did you read the Tesla blog post?  Assuming they didn't straight up fabricate all that raw data, it's pretty easy to draw a conclusion.  I don't think any judge or jury is going to take the word of a known shill with an axe to grind (and outside, non-neutral employers) over empirical computer data.
 
2013-02-14 02:03:02 PM

Brother_Mouzone: I skimmed through this thread but it appears no one has pointed out that this is Broder's response from two days ago, before the data was released.


Came here to say this.  NYT "journalist" has thusfar failed to address the actual data released.
 
2013-02-14 02:03:39 PM

TheDirtyNacho: Nowadays a lot of media and enthusiasts do their road performance timing using GPS devices.


Thats because GPS signals are signals sent from an atomic clock. They're using timecodes not the location data.
 
2013-02-14 02:03:41 PM

fluffy2097: themanuf: So you are saying the logs and the speed indicated on the speedometer are from different sources of data? If the car's computer was capable of knowing and logging the actual speed why wouldn't that same data stream go to the speedometer as well?

Because data logging is done via GPS tracking whereas speedometer readings are based off rotations of the wheels, which is something that varies depending on the diameter of the wheels you have.

/Has a GPS in his car
//Dash speedo is not connected to GPS speedo.


I find it very hard to believe that the speed data in that chart is based of gps data.  My reasoning:

GPS will give you a location at any given moment.  You would have to be polling gps data at an insane rate and with very high accuracy to generate that chart.  Also, you would need to account for the time domain if you are going to calculate speed based on location/time data.  Correcting for the moments when the car wasn't moving would be difficult and annoying.
 
2013-02-14 02:03:55 PM
Atreyou40: " I'm no physicist, "

That's an understatement.
Yes, I know what regenerative braking is.  You, unfortunately, do not.  You may think you do, but you don't.
The energy reclaimed from a stop is never, ever greater than the energy taken to move the car to get to that point.  It can not be, no matter what tech is invented, because of the second law of thermodynamics. (And before you farkers start: yes, if you were rolling down a hill *a given stop* might regenerate more energy, you pedant bastards. But it took you more energy than the 'extra' reclaimed energy to get up the damn hill in the first place. So unless you're on a one-way trip from Boulder to the damn sea, elevation is a wash, at best.)

So, yes, electric cars do better than ICE cars in traffic, because they don't waste energy when stopped.
And, yes, cars with regenerative braking do better in traffic than cars without, because they recoup some of the energy that would have been lost.

But that doesn't mean that an electric car with regenerative brakes in traffic is more efficient than an electric car with regenerative brakes, driven at 45-52 mph on the highway, as the author claimed he was doing.

And taking a 60 highway mile trip, and turning it into 60 highway miles + 2 city miles, is never, ever going to result in less energy needed for the whole trip. Even if the 2 city miles magically took 0 energy, it would simply be a wash.  And zero energy is, again, impossible unless your trip involves slowly rolling into the sea.  And we could only *be* so lucky, were that the case.
 
2013-02-14 02:05:10 PM

gweilo8888: MadCat: The logs that Tesla released directly contradict statements made by the reporter. Cue NYT Reporter accusing Tesla of falsifying data...

Does it? Because frankly, I see periods of speeds not terribly dissimilar to what the journo claimed. In fact, similar and consistent enough that if anything, I'd guess the speedo is off on the car, and the journo was exceeding the speed he believed himself to be driving due to a hopelessly inaccurate speedo. (In other words, a speedo like pretty much every car I've ever driven -- few have ever come within 5mph of accurate while driving at 55mph for me, showing readings anywhere from sub-50 to over-60.


You need to get better cars. Seriously, you really need to buy better cars. I've owned 11 cars over the course of my life, ranging from a used 86 Cutlas to a new BMW, and never has the speedometer been off by more than 2mph when compared to radar results. The speedometer is usually dead on, which always surprises me.

Changing out wheel and tire sizes can have an effect on your speedometer reading, but I'm guessing a stock from the factory test car will have a speedometer off by more than 1mph.
 
2013-02-14 02:06:40 PM

themanuf: GPS will give you a location at any given moment. You would have to be polling gps data at an insane rate and with very high accuracy to generate that chart. Also, you would need to account for the time domain if you are going to calculate speed based on location/time data. Correcting for the moments when the car wasn't moving would be difficult and annoying.


I  imagine that they probably polled it every 5 seconds or so. 2 days and 600 miles makes a 5 second polling time pretty reasonable, and even storing engine parameters, you're not going to generate more then a few GB of logfiles.
 
2013-02-14 02:09:08 PM

ukexpat: ChuckNorrisSays: Jeremy Clarkson is an assbag.

Possibly, but he did punch Piers Morgan in the face, so he does have that going for him.


And poured water on his head.

I'll side with Clarkson. He's a dick, but charming and funny.
 
2013-02-14 02:09:59 PM

Source4leko: Great Janitor: Jeremy Clarkson is probably my favorite reality show person and I love everything he says and does on Top Gear.  Last time I bought a car I treated each test drive as if I were Jeremy Clarkson doing something on Top Gear.  There are many used car salesmen who hate me.

There's no way I'd buy a car from someone who wouldn't let me drive it like I'm Jeremy Clarkson.  Is there something wrong with the it that they are trying to hide?  If there's not, it should do 0-60 pretty close to what its published time is.


That is exactly how I test drive too.  I was out test driving a Mazda 6 that was a good deal, not a bad car either.  I floored it going uphill to see what the pickup was like.  The automatic transmission froze when we hit 45 or so trying to shift, and it felt like getting punched in the lower back.

To his credit the salesman was pretty pissed out it too (probably since it injured his back), and when we got back to the dealership, we found out it had a lot of transmission issues when it was traded in.
 
2013-02-14 02:14:01 PM

themanuf: So you are saying the logs and the speed indicated on the speedometer are from different sources of data?  If the car's computer was capable of knowing and logging the actual speed why wouldn't that same data stream go to the speedometer as well?


Perhaps they log GPS speed but display tyre speed?
 
2013-02-14 02:14:45 PM

fluffy2097: I imagine that they probably polled it every 5 seconds or so. 2 days and 600 miles makes a 5 second polling time pretty reasonable, and even storing engine parameters, you're not going to generate more then a few GB of logfiles.


According to someone who broke down the data stream from the logging system on the roadster:

"Data while driving is saved once per second, minute and 10 minutes. Data from charging is once per minute as well as other unknown entries. " Link

So, yeah, datalogging every second doesn't point towards a GPS speed system
 
2013-02-14 02:15:25 PM

Theaetetus: (ii) Because if Musk can't actually prove that the shill lied, the NYT could argue that his credibility is increased and it's Tesla's that is diminished.


The Streisand Top Gear effect at work.
 
2013-02-14 02:16:26 PM
Yes there are some consistencies with the data and the reporter's account that could be explained by improperly calibrated gauges or telemetry. That's not the point. The one damning error the reporter made was putting in half as much juice as required for the subsequent leg of his trip after nearly running out of juice on prior legs. Expecting a car running on any energy source to be able to go 60+ miles on 31 miles worth of energy is insanity.

The reporter needs to admit that he made a mistake, only then can he defend the rest of his review.
 
2013-02-14 02:17:40 PM

Famous Thamas: The automatic transmission


Well there's your problem...

/might as well start that fight in this thread too
 
2013-02-14 02:19:10 PM

MadCat: Yes there are some consistencies with the data and the reporter's account that could be explained by improperly calibrated gauges or telemetry. That's not the point. The one damning error the reporter made was putting in half as much juice as required for the subsequent leg of his trip after nearly running out of juice on prior legs. Expecting a car running on any energy source to be able to go 60+ miles on 31 miles worth of energy is insanity.

The reporter needs to admit that he made a mistake, only then can he defend the rest of his review.


Before I set out from my home in suburban Washington, I informed Tesla that I intended to make a brief stop in New York and that I would spend the night in the vicinity of Milford rather than trying to make it to Boston, which was theoretically possible with a full charge at Milford, although it was a bitterly cold night - and that clearly affects the car's range. I added 185 miles of range at Milford, knowing that I wouldn't need 242 or 265 miles before recharging the next morning.
When I parked the car for the night at a hotel, the range meter showed 90 miles remaining, and I was about 45 miles from the Milford Supercharger. As I recounted in the article, when I awoke the next morning the indicated range was 25 miles.


/since you can't read the article
 
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