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(Guardian)   So turns out the Mona Lisa at the Louvre may not actually be the real one. Don't look so smug   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 70
    More: Interesting, Switzerland, ETH-Zurich  
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7090 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Feb 2013 at 12:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-14 04:18:06 PM

tenpoundsofcheese: that would be interesting if it is what the article actually said.


Came in to say this.

It's not uncommon for artists to do a number of studies of the same thing. Shame on subby.

I got to the Louvre an hour before it opened, waited in line patiently while memorizing the layout of the museum to find it, then sprinted to have the painting all to myself for a half hour while the crowds milled through the museum. Damned if the only thing I can remember is that the painting was small, the room was very bright and there was an enormous painting to my left. I hate my brain.
 
2013-02-14 05:20:10 PM
I got to see the Girl with a Pearl Earring Saturday night...the "Dutch Mona Lisa." Transcendent. And all the booze was free. CASB!

mcreadyblue: The Mona Lisa is not painted on canvas.


Everyone else that learned that from Encyclopedia Brown...hands up.

/raises hand.
 
2013-02-14 05:26:40 PM

czetie: mcreadyblue: czetie: CatfoodSpork: Also if they only carbon dated the canvas to the early 1400s, that just means that's when the fabric was made. It doesn't provide any information about when the paint was applied to it.

This. If somebody were to fake a Mona Lisa, the first thing they would do is start with a lesser work of roughly the right age and clean the canvas. That's Forgery 101

/See also the Vinland Map

The Mona Lisa is not painted on canvas.

See? That proves it's a fake.

Seriously: The one in the Louvre is painted on wood (specifically, poplar). The one discussed in this article is painted on canvas. TMYK.


I have never heard an explanation of why he didn't use a canvas, as it was supposedly a commissioned piece.

I would think the practice pieces would be on wood and the delivered piece on a canvas as canvases were more expensive back in the early 1500's.
 
2013-02-14 05:44:44 PM

UseUrHeadFred: [images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 538x424]


Why did this take so long to get posted?  C'mon people.
 
2013-02-14 05:50:40 PM

jaharley: Agrees.


Came here for this.
 
2013-02-14 05:58:21 PM

amindtat: midigod: For additional perspective, he combined two of these techniques; the borders of the mouth, eyebrows (there are none), and the rest of the face are blurred or removed so as to draw attention to the eyes alone.

About the eyebrows being removed:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/3668700/Solved-Why-Mona-Lisa-d o esnt-have-eyebrows.html


I figured it was because she caught the plague... makes all your hair fall out...
 
2013-02-14 06:21:40 PM

Dr.Zom: Some 'Splainin' To Do: The tests on his 15th century portrait were carried out by a specialist in "sacred geometry" and by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in the wake of the Geneva unveiling of the painting, the Isleworth Mona Lisa, last September.

WTF is "Sacred Geometry" and how does an expertise in it apply to this situation?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_geometry for the first question. I have no idea as to the second.


Although Leonardo da Vinci wasn't all that much like the Dan Brown novels, but he was big on things like sacred geometry, and is known to have applied it in many of his works. That makes it useful to have an expert in the stuff on hand when authenticating his works: to identify mistakes that da Vinci himself would have taken pains to avoid but a copyist might not have thought about.
 
2013-02-14 06:54:48 PM
unveiling of the portrait - which shows a much younger woman than in the Louvre

so its a different painting, maybe of the same person, but still a different painting non the less.
 
2013-02-14 07:34:00 PM
So lots of people go to the Louvre and crowd in to see the Mona Lisa.  Big deal.

/went to the Louvre, joined the crowd to see the Mona Lisa.  Did not see ONLY the Mona Lisa while at the Louvre, but I wasn't going all the way there and not see the her.  Pretty sure all the other people in that crowd did the same thing.
//also went up in the Eiffel Tower like the tourist I was
///and Notre Dame
////and the Arc de Triomphe
//disappointed by lack of giant reptiles at Rodin Museum
 
2013-02-14 07:56:49 PM
L.H.O.O.Q.

/not obscure
 
2013-02-14 08:01:00 PM

tricycleracer: Why is a self-portrait of da Vinci in drag so popular anyway?




Bookmarks in time.
 
2013-02-14 08:46:32 PM
So, The Duo Lisa then?
 
2013-02-14 08:46:56 PM

mcreadyblue: czetie: mcreadyblue: czetie: CatfoodSpork: Also if they only carbon dated the canvas to the early 1400s, that just means that's when the fabric was made. It doesn't provide any information about when the paint was applied to it.

This. If somebody were to fake a Mona Lisa, the first thing they would do is start with a lesser work of roughly the right age and clean the canvas. That's Forgery 101

/See also the Vinland Map

The Mona Lisa is not painted on canvas.

See? That proves it's a fake.

Seriously: The one in the Louvre is painted on wood (specifically, poplar). The one discussed in this article is painted on canvas. TMYK.

I have never heard an explanation of why he didn't use a canvas, as it was supposedly a commissioned piece.

I would think the practice pieces would be on wood and the delivered piece on a canvas as canvases were more expensive back in the early 1500's.


Beats me. I didn't know it was on wood until the first time I saw it. I didn't know it was so small until then either, having (like everybody else) seen it so many times in reproduction much larger.
 
2013-02-14 09:01:19 PM

czetie: mcreadyblue: czetie: mcreadyblue: czetie: CatfoodSpork: Also if they only carbon dated the canvas to the early 1400s, that just means that's when the fabric was made. It doesn't provide any information about when the paint was applied to it.

This. If somebody were to fake a Mona Lisa, the first thing they would do is start with a lesser work of roughly the right age and clean the canvas. That's Forgery 101

/See also the Vinland Map

The Mona Lisa is not painted on canvas.

See? That proves it's a fake.

Seriously: The one in the Louvre is painted on wood (specifically, poplar). The one discussed in this article is painted on canvas. TMYK.

I have never heard an explanation of why he didn't use a canvas, as it was supposedly a commissioned piece.

I would think the practice pieces would be on wood and the delivered piece on a canvas as canvases were more expensive back in the early 1500's.

Beats me. I didn't know it was on wood until the first time I saw it. I didn't know it was so small until then either, having (like everybody else) seen it so many times in reproduction much larger.


On the other hand, this is a great opportunity to start a conspiracy theory: The piece on wood in the Louvre is, in fact, a small scale test piece that Leonardo did as a proof of concept for the person who commissioned it. The final picture is on canvas, is much larger, and is hidden away somewhere in the plot of a Dan Brown novel.
 
2013-02-14 10:28:19 PM
 
2013-02-14 10:30:37 PM

clambam: One has to wonder why Leonardo, who could barely bring himself to finish anything, would create a duplicate painting, right down to the pose and the outfit, ten or twenty years after doing the "original" Mona Lisa. And then carry it with him everywhere he went for the rest of his life. The "young" Mona Lisa looks amateurish to me, conventionalized and idealized, as though painted from the imagination rather than life, and the palette seems overly bright and inauthentic. The familiar Mona Lisa is a much deeper psychological portrait. Why would someone do a copy of the Mona Lisa as a young woman? Well, why would someone draw a moustache on her and add "L.H.O.O.Q."? Making a comment, making a joke, trying to cause trouble and stir up a controversy, maybe making a little money on the side. The Louvre version is a better painting.

Have to agree with everyone who commented on the huge crowds in front of the Mona Lisa in the Louvre. I recall going there as a teenager and being astounded that people would prefer to peer at the Mona Lisa from a distance of twenty feet when "The Madonna of the Rocks" and similar masterpieces went ignored in the same gallery just a few feet away.


Trust me, the Louvre Mona Lisa has a nice, bright period palette underneath all that farking shiatified old varnish. So I am curious, what do you think of the cleaned Sistine ceiling? That it ruined Michelangelo's awesome tonality? Lotsa people ate crow over that one, too.
 
2013-02-14 10:45:21 PM

lake_huron: L.H.O.O.Q.

/not obscure


And "My Erdös nuber is 7" isn't?
 
2013-02-14 11:16:54 PM

cretinbob: The X-Ray
[doctorwhotoys.net image 571x700]


Bravo sir. You deserve a jellybaby.
 
2013-02-15 05:39:52 AM

clambam: One has to wonder why Leonardo, who could barely bring himself to finish anything, would create a duplicate painting, right down to the pose and the outfit, ten or twenty years after doing the "original" Mona Lisa. And then carry it with him everywhere he went for the rest of his life


The Louvres actually has two Mona Lisas. The second one probably by a student from its workshop. I've seen it, and it's far more colorful than the most known one.

Actually, it's not that surprising to me. The Louvres had a special exhibition, when they unveiled the new restaured Da Vinci "Saint Anne". They took the opportunity to show the creative process of this painter. Da Vinci did a LOT, and I mean an awful lot, of sketches, studies, etc... he made several versions of the same painting, before settling on the final one. He had his students make copies... so, it's really not that surprising that several Mona Lisas by Da Vinci exists. He does not mean that the one at the Louvres is the fake, more that the older one is a prototype.
 
2013-02-15 08:29:55 AM

seelorq: lake_huron: L.H.O.O.Q.

/not obscure

And "My Erdös nuber is 7" isn't?


First off, I missed the previous reference, so I'm late to the party.

Secondly, NIOOF.  I mean, the 4th Doctor reference was in the second post.

Thirdly, in the Geek tab many Farkers would have Erdös numbers lower than mine.
 
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