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(Bloomberg)   America's oldest corporate director quits at age 96, finally decides he's served long enough on the boards of Smith Corona Typewriters, Encyclopedia Britannica   (bloomberg.com) divider line 13
    More: Interesting, Encyclopedia Britannica, retirements, University of Virginia, Robert F. Kennedy  
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1026 clicks; posted to Business » on 14 Feb 2013 at 12:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-14 11:50:58 AM  
universityoflies.files.wordpress.com
Smithers! Get the horseless carriage!
 
2013-02-14 12:30:58 PM  
one and done
 
2013-02-14 01:44:49 PM  
Those buggy whips aren't going to make themselves ya know.
 
2013-02-14 02:47:15 PM  
96 year olds still being active in tax law is kindof what's wrong with our political system in this country..
 
2013-02-14 03:55:58 PM  

Somaticasual: 96 year olds still being active in tax law is kindof what's wrong with our political system in this country..


Because we certainly wouldn't want someone with extensive direct experience to be even remotely involved. Our mistakes are so nice we like to make them twice.
 
2013-02-14 04:04:48 PM  
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RIP Mortimer Duke
 
2013-02-14 04:30:54 PM  

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: Somaticasual: 96 year olds still being active in tax law is kindof what's wrong with our political system in this country..

Because we certainly wouldn't want someone with extensive direct experience to be even remotely involved. Our mistakes are so nice we like to make them twice.


At 96, someone's mental faculties and ability to manage the complex needs of a massive company are likely to have significantly faded. AND, he would be the guy that made the mistake the first time (in your metaphor). I'd say the same thing about strom thurmond being in office as long as that racist 40s throwback was.
 
2013-02-14 04:55:42 PM  

Somaticasual: Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: Somaticasual: 96 year olds still being active in tax law is kindof what's wrong with our political system in this country..

Because we certainly wouldn't want someone with extensive direct experience to be even remotely involved. Our mistakes are so nice we like to make them twice.

At 96, someone's mental faculties and ability to manage the complex needs of a massive company are likely to have significantly faded. AND, he would be the guy that made the mistake the first time (in your metaphor). I'd say the same thing about strom thurmond being in office as long as that racist 40s throwback was.


Which is precisely why he would make an excellent teacher or consultant. Being "active in tax law" doesn't mean he's the guy behind the curtain. There are tens of thousands of people "active in tax law", from helping to write legislation down to translating what it means to law students and/or clients. My position is that if he still has something to offer, we'd be foolish to deny his contribution. Your position is that he shouldn't be involved in anything in that spectrum.

And since you used Strom Thurmond as your example as opposed to Robert Byrd, it tells me that your issue isn't so much "we don't want 96-year olds to be involved" as it is "we don't want 96-year olds whom I don't like to be involved".
 
2013-02-14 05:09:22 PM  
Those businesses became as old and out of date as the man himself.

Job done.
 
2013-02-14 05:46:20 PM  
You forgot his past experience at Trans-Atlantic Zeppelin, Amalgamated Spats, Congreves Inflammable Powders, US Hay, Baltimore Opera Hat Company and Confederated Slave Holdings.

http://www.forbes.com/2005/12/06/montomery-burns-wealt_cx_de_05fict1 5_ 1206burnsprofile.html
 
2013-02-14 05:46:42 PM  

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: And since you used Strom Thurmond as your example as opposed to Robert Byrd, it tells me that your issue isn't so much "we don't want 96-year olds to be involved" as it is "we don't want 96-year olds whom I don't like to be involved".


Actually he was just the easiest known reference for an old congressman that outlived his ability to serve rationally but was still re-elected over and over again. But don't get me wrong - obviously I don't like strom thurmond , he set civil rights back by virtue of being the evil embodiment of good ol boy southern politics.

Sorry, but unless it's literally just getting his opinion with a historical perspective, a 96 year old should not have any weight in deciding any sort of contemporary tax laws unless humanity progresses where they'll be biologically at the top of their game at 96.  His decisions will be affecting hundreds of not thousands of people, and honestly it's just not fair to business development or the public at large for policies to be written by people

Before responding, ask yourself if you'd like your taxes to be done by a 96 year old, or a if you'd be comfortable being operated on by a 96-year-old surgeon. If the answer is anything but a resounding "that sounds great!", then I'd urge some re-thought on your position.
 
2013-02-14 08:41:11 PM  

show me: [universityoflies.files.wordpress.com image 299x302]
Smithers! Get the horseless carriage!


He must have been too late for the 4:30 Auto-gyro.  How else will the letter get to the Prussian Consulate?
 
2013-02-15 12:44:49 PM  
Good on him. It's nice to hear about an old person who's still sharp enough to hold down a fulltime job. Some basic concepts never change despite people insisting everything has to be scrum and agile, and I'm sure he's been smart enough to delegate a lot of the day to day to his lieutenants.
 
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