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(Bozeman Daily Chronicle)   Tough: trying to make it on a teacher's salary. C'mon, man: having your W-2 state you have four times the taxable income you actually do   (bozemandailychronicle.com) divider line 146
    More: Fail, taxable income, salary, teachers  
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12602 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Feb 2013 at 3:52 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-13 02:15:30 PM
Meh
Fixed in 30 minutes.  White people problems.
 
2013-02-13 02:26:22 PM

cretinbob: Meh
Fixed in 30 minutes.  White people problems.


I don't think even the white people had a problem.
 
2013-02-13 02:32:30 PM
It's an Obamacare thing. They have to list the three months off as a benefit and every benefit has to have a monetary amount that can be taxable. Since those teachers could get a job that pays min wage they could quadruple the money they make each year.

'cause you know they are so underpaid.

/snark
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-02-13 03:17:31 PM

From the original article:

Before saving a final file, Andersen said a couple of the W-2s were spot-checked to make sure things were correct. They were because school officials were looking at the latest file, she said. But when they did a final save, unbeknownst to them, the software compressed four different files they had worked on.
"If we would have refreshed it, we would have had the latest file and it would have been correct."
Can anybody make sense of this explanation?
 
2013-02-13 03:55:59 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: It's an Obamacare thing. They have to list the three months off as a benefit and every benefit has to have a monetary amount that can be taxable. Since those teachers could get a job that pays min wage they could quadruple the money they make each year.

'cause you know they are so underpaid.

/snark


You might be snarking, but you just know that the true believers will be along shortly to tell us all about how teachers have it so easy and how this one teacher they had was terrible and didn't give them enough gold stars and plus unions.
 
2013-02-13 03:57:06 PM

ZAZ: From the original article:Before saving a final file, Andersen said a couple of the W-2s were spot-checked to make sure things were correct. They were because school officials were looking at the latest file, she said. But when they did a final save, unbeknownst to them, the software compressed four different files they had worked on.
"If we would have refreshed it, we would have had the latest file and it would have been correct."Can anybody make sense of this explanation?


Sounds like the software tabulated the results of each of the working copies and added them together before spitting out the final product.

You'd bet if I got a W-2 that said I earned near 6 figures I'd frame that sucker.
 
2013-02-13 03:59:33 PM

ZAZ: From the original article:Before saving a final file, Andersen said a couple of the W-2s were spot-checked to make sure things were correct. They were because school officials were looking at the latest file, she said. But when they did a final save, unbeknownst to them, the software compressed four different files they had worked on.
"If we would have refreshed it, we would have had the latest file and it would have been correct."Can anybody make sense of this explanation?


I believe that they realigned the phase generator and accidentally reversed the polarity when compiling the main matrix.

/I have been watching too many Star Trek episodes recently.
 
2013-02-13 04:00:01 PM
Soooo.... there were some typos on some forms? Is that basically the story that was just greenlit?
 
2013-02-13 04:00:03 PM
Fast forward to the next election: Tax records indicate our teachers are earning FOUR TIMES what they claim!

/my employer has now issued its third W2 because the finance people keep farking it up somehow
 
2013-02-13 04:04:46 PM

ZAZ: From the original article:Before saving a final file, Andersen said a couple of the W-2s were spot-checked to make sure things were correct. They were because school officials were looking at the latest file, she said. But when they did a final save, unbeknownst to them, the software compressed four different files they had worked on.
"If we would have refreshed it, we would have had the latest file and it would have been correct."Can anybody make sense of this explanation?


"We farked up but are blaming it on software".
 
2013-02-13 04:06:38 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Soooo.... there were some typos on some forms? Is that basically the story that was just greenlit?


and they were fixed, yes.
 
2013-02-13 04:06:46 PM
So? They still wouldn't have to pay any tax as they would be below the minimum taxable wage.
 
2013-02-13 04:08:22 PM
Tough: trying to make it on a teacher's salary.

Everybody else in my family is or was a teacher or professional school employee - both parents, sister, uncle, and wife.

The money's okay, benefits very helpful compared to most, tenure's worth rather a lot in a touchy economy, and it still comes with a pension on top of whatever 403(b) you want to set up. I wouldn't call making it on teacher's compensation 'tough', especially after the first few years. The gig puts you solidly in the middle class in most places.
 
2013-02-13 04:08:47 PM
What, did they include benefits as taxable income?
 
2013-02-13 04:11:06 PM
This is simply insane!  How do you even pick a thread tag for something like this?

I've seen some crazy shiat in my life but I am standing here dumbfounded.

Amazing, simply amazing.
 
2013-02-13 04:14:48 PM
got all my tax forms in and filed but ran into some snafus:
1.)my 1098-T can't be filed till the 15th
2.)have to file a 1040X to add the form 5405
and the clincher:
3.)wife owes student loans so the refund that we were initially expected got nipped.

/thank god for 8379
/too many numbers sheesh.
 
2013-02-13 04:17:28 PM

Dimensio: I believe that they realigned the phase generator and accidentally reversed the polarity when compiling the main matrix.


But won't that flood the containment chamber with verteron particles?
 
2013-02-13 04:20:29 PM
Tough trying to make it on a teacher's salary?  They aren't rich, but the lowest (LOWEST) average teacher salary by state is just shy of 40K.  This is higher than the average HOUSEHOLD income for the lowest state, which is just above 39K.

Yes, I have citations:

Teacher salaries by state:  http://www.teacherportal.com/teacher-salaries-by-state/
Household income by state: http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/data/statemedian/

I'm saying teachers have it easy, are overpaid, or aren't valuable, but lets not pretend it is the lowest paid profession, not including summers off.
 
2013-02-13 04:22:18 PM
Fail? More like laughable mistake that was fixed faster than it took to biatch to people about it.
 
2013-02-13 04:22:47 PM
I only hope the IRS got the correct W-2 information from the district as well.  Otherwise that could be a problem...
 
2013-02-13 04:25:00 PM
Not only are teachers, in fact, well paid, they work 175 days a year and have 190 days off (most people work 260 days, and have 105 days off). They retire young, with full benefits and pension for life.

Best of all, no matter how useless they are, they are almost impossible to fire.
 
2013-02-13 04:26:45 PM

wiredroach: Dimensio: I believe that they realigned the phase generator and accidentally reversed the polarity when compiling the main matrix.

But won't that flood the containment chamber with verteron particles?


You have to jiggle the handle.
 
2013-02-13 04:27:20 PM
Meh. Median income for a tenured teacher in the district I graduated from is north of $85K ... which would be $113K if they worked a full year.

But yeah, let's keep talking about how tough it is on teachers.
 
2013-02-13 04:30:58 PM
CSB:

My last shop sent my 2012 1099-misc with all of my former co-worker's credit earnings on it...needless to say it is impossible for me to make over $10,000 in the one month I was there.

/CSB
 
2013-02-13 04:31:56 PM

Dwindle: Not only are teachers, in fact, well paid, they work 175 days a year and have 190 days off (most people work 260 days, and have 105 days off). They retire young, with full benefits and pension for life.

Best of all, no matter how useless they are, they are almost impossible to fire.


I lol'd.
 
2013-02-13 04:34:52 PM

Gulper Eel: Tough: trying to make it on a teacher's salary.

Everybody else in my family is or was a teacher or professional school employee - both parents, sister, uncle, and wife.

The money's okay, benefits very helpful compared to most, tenure's worth rather a lot in a touchy economy, and it still comes with a pension on top of whatever 403(b) you want to set up. I wouldn't call making it on teacher's compensation 'tough', especially after the first few years. The gig puts you solidly in the middle class in most places.


This is true.  Here in CA, if you divide your salary by the number of days you work, you're doing about as well as the typical engineer.  Factor in 10 "no quesions asked sick days", 3 months off, every obscure holiday off compared with working weekends, getting yelled at, experiencing abuse at all levels, realizing HR's sole function is to protect management from lawsuits, Teaching is actually a good career choice.

I'm going to push my daughter into Government employment.  20 years ago I would've stated otherwise but it's becoming clearer "who really works for who" in Society.
 
2013-02-13 04:36:18 PM

Wook: Gulper Eel: Tough: trying to make it on a teacher's salary.

Everybody else in my family is or was a teacher or professional school employee - both parents, sister, uncle, and wife.

The money's okay, benefits very helpful compared to most, tenure's worth rather a lot in a touchy economy, and it still comes with a pension on top of whatever 403(b) you want to set up. I wouldn't call making it on teacher's compensation 'tough', especially after the first few years. The gig puts you solidly in the middle class in most places.

This is true.  Here in CA, if you divide your salary by the number of days you work, you're doing about as well as the typical engineer.  Factor in 10 "no quesions asked sick days", 3 months off, every obscure holiday off compared with working weekends, getting yelled at, experiencing abuse at all levels, realizing HR's sole function is to protect management from lawsuits, Teaching is actually a good career choice.

I'm going to push my daughter into Government employment.  20 years ago I would've stated otherwise but it's becoming clearer "who really works for who" in Society.


I forgot to add that a 6.5 hour workday isn't soo bad.  Sorry CA teachers, you guys have it very very easy comparatively speaking.
 
2013-02-13 04:41:30 PM

ZAZ: From the original article:Before saving a final file, Andersen said a couple of the W-2s were spot-checked to make sure things were correct. They were because school officials were looking at the latest file, she said. But when they did a final save, unbeknownst to them, the software compressed four different files they had worked on.
"If we would have refreshed it, we would have had the latest file and it would have been correct."Can anybody make sense of this explanation?


Yup.  Anderson is an idiot, who shouldn't be allowed near a toaster oven, much less a computer.
 
2013-02-13 04:41:52 PM

baronbloodbath: You'd bet if I got a W-2 that said I earned near 6 figures I'd frame that sucker.


I just got a 1099 for an extra $350,000 that I never got paid. I wasn't amused, just the opposite, I was freaked because I knew that the government was going to come looking for taxes that are a hell of a lot more than I made last year. Imagine the nightmare of trying to prove to the IRS that you really didn't get paid something.

I don't expect them to be understanding.

/I'm told that the error had been corrected
//I just hope that doesn't mean the company sent another 1099 to the correct company, but didn't inform the IRS that I got mine in error.
///The company that farked up is a huge Insurance company, I'm sure they got........ Oh Fark
 
2013-02-13 04:41:57 PM

Wook: Wook: Gulper Eel: Tough: trying to make it on a teacher's salary.

Everybody else in my family is or was a teacher or professional school employee - both parents, sister, uncle, and wife.

The money's okay, benefits very helpful compared to most, tenure's worth rather a lot in a touchy economy, and it still comes with a pension on top of whatever 403(b) you want to set up. I wouldn't call making it on teacher's compensation 'tough', especially after the first few years. The gig puts you solidly in the middle class in most places.

This is true.  Here in CA, if you divide your salary by the number of days you work, you're doing about as well as the typical engineer.  Factor in 10 "no quesions asked sick days", 3 months off, every obscure holiday off compared with working weekends, getting yelled at, experiencing abuse at all levels, realizing HR's sole function is to protect management from lawsuits, Teaching is actually a good career choice.

I'm going to push my daughter into Government employment.  20 years ago I would've stated otherwise but it's becoming clearer "who really works for who" in Society.

I forgot to add that a 6.5 hour workday isn't soo bad.  Sorry CA teachers, you guys have it very very easy comparatively speaking.


What about making lesson plans, grading work, extra help, having to deal with insufferable parents, having to deal with insufferable kids, always being at risk for a sexual misconduct allegation (especially if you're male) that can completely ruin your career if someone has it in for you, etc...
 
2013-02-13 04:44:22 PM

mjbok: Tough trying to make it on a teacher's salary?  They aren't rich, but the lowest (LOWEST) average teacher salary by state is just shy of 40K.  This is higher than the average HOUSEHOLD income for the lowest state, which is just above 39K.

Yes, I have citations:

Teacher salaries by state:  http://www.teacherportal.com/teacher-salaries-by-state/
Household income by state: http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/data/statemedian/

I'm saying teachers have it easy, are overpaid, or aren't valuable, but lets not pretend it is the lowest paid profession, not including summers off.


Apples and some larger set of fruit that includes apples. Your numbers are comparing a profession with an educational requirement of a minimum of a 4 year degree to all occupations.

I know you weren't making the point that teachers aren't underpaid, but others use the same data to make that very point.
 
2013-02-13 04:45:00 PM

Wook: 3 months off


Three unpaid months off. And unless you're dug in (and can recycle last year's material for all classes), one of those months will be spent planning, gathering materials for the next year, setting up the classroom, and trying to get the deficiencies sorted out before the year starts on a bad foot.

Wook: I forgot to add that a 6.5 hour workday isn't soo bad.


6.5 paid hour workday. The unpaid part tacks on another hour or two, plus a few hours on the weekend. If there's a serious deficiency in the available curricular supplies, it can become an "all waking hour" thing.
 
2013-02-13 04:49:39 PM

HotWingConspiracy: Fast forward to the next election: Tax records indicate our teachers are earning FOUR TIMES what they claim!

/my employer has now issued its third W2 because the finance people keep farking it up somehow


That's pretty bad.  In over 2 decades of working I never had a corrected statement.  Of course, that could be because they were even  more incompetent and failed to notice their mistakes.  :)
 
2013-02-13 04:52:03 PM

Dwindle: Not only are teachers, in fact, well paid, they work 175 days a year and have 190 days off (most people work 260 days, and have 105 days off). They retire young, with full benefits and pension for life.

Best of all, no matter how useless they are, they are almost impossible to fire.


My work year is 192 days. On the 193rd day, I become unemployed. I can retire at age 62, though that's true insofar as I want to take the associated social security penalty, so I won't. That number is because I stayed at 22, and will have worked for 40 years. This is the same as mmHg grandmother, who worked in insurance.

As for being hard to fire: well if you mean I can't be fired because my boss doesn't like my haircut, I guess I'm guilty as charged. If however I commit malpractice of any sort, it's pretty easy. If that's not the case with you, maybe you should ask why.

/insert aphorism about "crabs pulling each other back in the bucket" here
 
2013-02-13 04:52:51 PM
EZ1923: I know you weren't making the point that teachers aren't underpaid, but others use the same data to make that very point.

Actually, that is exactly his point. And he is correct.
 
2013-02-13 04:52:54 PM

Dimensio: ZAZ: From the original article:Before saving a final file, Andersen said a couple of the W-2s were spot-checked to make sure things were correct. They were because school officials were looking at the latest file, she said. But when they did a final save, unbeknownst to them, the software compressed four different files they had worked on.
"If we would have refreshed it, we would have had the latest file and it would have been correct."Can anybody make sense of this explanation?

I believe that they realigned the phase generator and accidentally reversed the polarity when compiling the main matrix.

/I have been watching too many Star Trek episodes recently.


No such thing as too much Trek.
 
2013-02-13 04:54:54 PM

Dimensio: I believe that they realigned the phase generator and accidentally reversed the polarity when compiling the main matrix.

/I have been watching too many Star Trek episodes recently.


You've got it all wrong. It was the cross-circuiting to "B" that saved the day.
 
2013-02-13 04:57:08 PM

MooseUpNorth: Wook: 3 months off

Three unpaid months off. And unless you're dug in (and can recycle last year's material for all classes), one of those months will be spent planning, gathering materials for the next year, setting up the classroom, and trying to get the deficiencies sorted out before the year starts on a bad foot.

Wook: I forgot to add that a 6.5 hour workday isn't soo bad.

6.5 paid hour workday. The unpaid part tacks on another hour or two, plus a few hours on the weekend. If there's a serious deficiency in the available curricular supplies, it can become an "all waking hour" thing.


You know what everyone else in the world who is salaried - that's a fixed periodic compensation for work or services - gets paid? Estimated per year. So if they're having salaries estimated per year then their choice not to spread that over the whole year is their own choice. If they don't have that choice then that's a talking point, but they aren't working on contract, they get benefits and they have a specific position.

I have an 8 hour work day, but I am on call 24x7. Some weeks I have put in over 100 hours, some weeks I fark around in Star Wars: TOR in the office because work is slow. I get paid a salary, which means they send me money as a retainer for my services.

So unless those 2 months in the summer count towards PTO, it is paid farking time off. That they choose to be financially irresponsible and not have their salaries spread over the course of that time like the rest of the world and therefore expect more for some reason is their own weird farking issue.
 
2013-02-13 04:58:34 PM

EZ1923: The Stealth Hippopotamus: It's an Obamacare thing. They have to list the three months off as a benefit and every benefit has to have a monetary amount that can be taxable. Since those teachers could get a job that pays min wage they could quadruple the money they make each year.

'cause you know they are so underpaid.

/snark

You might be snarking, but you just know that the true believers will be along shortly to tell us all about how teachers have it so easy and how this one teacher they had was terrible and didn't give them enough gold stars and plus unions.


The unions mandated that the teachers not give them any gold stars.
 
2013-02-13 04:59:11 PM

umad: EZ1923: I know you weren't making the point that teachers aren't underpaid, but others use the same data to make that very point.

Actually, that is exactly his point. And he is correct.


Where did the bad teacher touch you?
 
2013-02-13 04:59:54 PM

EZ1923: My work year is 192 days. On the 193rd day, I become unemployed


Really? So every new school year you go through the hiring process all over again, sending out your resume and going on interviews and watching that increasing time lapse between employment grow the way everyone else does - a potential detriment to being hired again? Wow man that totally sucks, here I thought you guys just stopped going to the office for two months until classes resumed.
 
2013-02-13 05:03:57 PM

Dwindle: most people work 260 days, and have 105 days off




Over 3 months off?!? I'm guessing you're counting weekends? That would be 104 days plus one sick day
 
2013-02-13 05:04:15 PM

StaleCoffee: That they choose to be financially irresponsible and not have their salaries spread over the course of that time like the rest of the world and therefore expect more for some reason is their own weird farking issue.


You sound mad. a) I wasn't biatching about how hard I have it. I was correcting Wook on two severe misconceptions. I don't have it made the way Wook thinks I do, but I don't consider myself under severe hardship either. b) I don't actually give a shiat how much you work or what you make. Nor am I attempting to politically interfere with your bargaining, collective or otherwise.
 
2013-02-13 05:04:32 PM

Gulper Eel: Tough: trying to make it on a teacher's salary.

Everybody else in my family is or was a teacher or professional school employee - both parents, sister, uncle, and wife.

The money's okay, benefits very helpful compared to most, tenure's worth rather a lot in a touchy economy, and it still comes with a pension on top of whatever 403(b) you want to set up. I wouldn't call making it on teacher's compensation 'tough', especially after the first few years. The gig puts you solidly in the middle class in most places.

I live in South Florida and my GF is a teacher and she doesn't make shiat. 36k a year to deal with a bunch of brats isn't worth it, but I'm glad she loves. We live paycheck to paycheck at best, sometimes moving money around to pay the necessary bills. I'm just getting started in real estate mortgages, but it doesn't pay well off the bat.

Rick Scott has put all employees wages on freeze and she's been making the same amount for 6 years. Even with a low mortgage and no car payments, we barely get by.

Teachers work really hard to get paid dirt. They are in at 7am, have to tutor after work for extra money, and do not get repaid for the supplies they purchase for their classroom. The school gives them $50 a year for supplies. That doesn't even cover the cost of paper for 18 kids throughout a school year.

 
2013-02-13 05:06:41 PM

EZ1923: umad: EZ1923: I know you weren't making the point that teachers aren't underpaid, but others use the same data to make that very point.

Actually, that is exactly his point. And he is correct.

Where did the bad teacher touch you?


If all teachers have your reading comprehension abilities then you are definitely overpaid. Read his post again and then read your response. I'm not surprised you are a teacher. If you were actually intelligent you would be doing something else.
 
2013-02-13 05:07:06 PM

Gone In 26 Minutes: Wook: Wook: Gulper Eel: Tough: trying to make it on a teacher's salary.

Everybody else in my family is or was a teacher or professional school employee - both parents, sister, uncle, and wife.

The money's okay, benefits very helpful compared to most, tenure's worth rather a lot in a touchy economy, and it still comes with a pension on top of whatever 403(b) you want to set up. I wouldn't call making it on teacher's compensation 'tough', especially after the first few years. The gig puts you solidly in the middle class in most places.

This is true.  Here in CA, if you divide your salary by the number of days you work, you're doing about as well as the typical engineer.  Factor in 10 "no quesions asked sick days", 3 months off, every obscure holiday off compared with working weekends, getting yelled at, experiencing abuse at all levels, realizing HR's sole function is to protect management from lawsuits, Teaching is actually a good career choice.

I'm going to push my daughter into Government employment.  20 years ago I would've stated otherwise but it's becoming clearer "who really works for who" in Society.

I forgot to add that a 6.5 hour workday isn't soo bad.  Sorry CA teachers, you guys have it very very easy comparatively speaking.

What about making lesson plans, grading work, extra help, having to deal with insufferable parents, having to deal with insufferable kids, always being at risk for a sexual misconduct allegation (especially if you're male) that can completely ruin your career if someone has it in for you, etc...


What about working grave shift, swing shift, being forced to work overtime with out pay, attending sexual harrassment courses stating I can be guilty of sexual harrassment without knowing it, 7pm meetings with Korea (after you've been sweating in a Lab for 10 hours), watching your friends and mentors get laid off every month for 10 years????  Life a biatch. I'd rather be coddled by the State granted I'd be expected to walk the Democratic party line...
 
2013-02-13 05:08:19 PM

StaleCoffee: Really? So every new school year you go through the hiring process all over again, sending out your resume and going on interviews and watching that increasing time lapse between employment grow the way everyone else does - a potential detriment to being hired again?


Yes. Until you are tenured, you basically have to jump through hoops every single year. (Resumes, interviews for contracts, maintaining a teaching portfolio, potentially having to substitute teach for significant parts of the year, etc.) It's not quite as bad as private sector "temp" agency jobs, but it's not cushy guaranteed renewals, either.
 
2013-02-13 05:08:57 PM

MooseUpNorth: StaleCoffee: That they choose to be financially irresponsible and not have their salaries spread over the course of that time like the rest of the world and therefore expect more for some reason is their own weird farking issue.

You sound mad. a) I wasn't biatching about how hard I have it. I was correcting Wook on two severe misconceptions. I don't have it made the way Wook thinks I do, but I don't consider myself under severe hardship either. b) I don't actually give a shiat how much you work or what you make. Nor am I attempting to politically interfere with your bargaining, collective or otherwise.


I'm not any angrier than you are about it. Your corrections are just wrong, unless you want to redefine what "unpaid" and "salary" means. If you weren't biatching about it then why try to correct him?

Your salary is for all the work you do, annually. Unless you actually get an hourly wage, at which point the hours you put in make a difference and you should be putting in for your overtime pay.
 
2013-02-13 05:10:07 PM

StaleCoffee: EZ1923: My work year is 192 days. On the 193rd day, I become unemployed

Really? So every new school year you go through the hiring process all over again, sending out your resume and going on interviews and watching that increasing time lapse between employment grow the way everyone else does - a potential detriment to being hired again? Wow man that totally sucks, here I thought you guys just stopped going to the office for two months until classes resumed.


I'm glad I'm here to help. Actually, that does occasionally happen. Once at my school, everyone was interviewed for their own jobs. I was rehired, some others weren't. I suppose I could have used the term furloughed rather than unemployed, but either way I'm not getting paid.

You see, I'm not actually salaried. At least in my state, my contract is hourly but for a set term of 7.5 hours a day, 192 days a year. My contract expires and I stop getting paid. Now, I do ask the district to hold a portion of my income for the summer, but that is payment for work I already did.

Any other misconceptions I can clear up? It is, after all, what I do.
 
2013-02-13 05:10:52 PM

MooseUpNorth: Wook: 3 months off

Three unpaid months off. And unless you're dug in (and can recycle last year's material for all classes), one of those months will be spent planning, gathering materials for the next year, setting up the classroom, and trying to get the deficiencies sorted out before the year starts on a bad foot.

Wook: I forgot to add that a 6.5 hour workday isn't soo bad.

6.5 paid hour workday. The unpaid part tacks on another hour or two, plus a few hours on the weekend. If there's a serious deficiency in the available curricular supplies, it can become an "all waking hour" thing.



3 months off = 3 months off
6.5 hours a day is << than 10 hours a day (also factor in beating commute)

Dont give me that crap about grading papers and all this extra stuff teachers do, its still way less demaning than the private sector.  Like the rest of you Democrats, I'm surrounded by teachers (family, GF, Mom, etc.), say what you like, its contrary to reality.
 
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