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(Americablog)   The AP bans using the words "Husband", "Wife" and "Fellow Human" when referring to married same-sex couples. Yes, some people have a problem with this   (americablog.com) divider line 158
    More: Stupid, U.S. state abbreviations, same-sex couples, John Aravosis, AMERICAblog, Reliable Sources, U.S. Senate, same-sex marriages, cohabitations  
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5900 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Feb 2013 at 2:40 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-13 10:35:57 PM  
"Spouse"

Problem solved, outrage avoided.

/dnrtfa
//dnrtft
 
2013-02-13 10:56:43 PM  

MikeBoomshadow: victrin: I'm gay, and frankly I hate the term 'partner'. I am not in a business relationship with my boyfriend. If we wind up married we will be husband and husband (we live in New York, so it is possible).

Would that mean no engagement ring or two engagement rings?

/not trying to be mean, just silly
//also not in jewelry sales
///virgules


I would just wear a plain gold band and he would wear something similar. As far as I'm aware, men usually wear just a gold band as a wedding ring.
 
2013-02-13 11:36:10 PM  

gopher321: Umm...how about 'spouse'?


How about "husband"?  who is the AP to decide what I call my husband.  (I mean, if I had a husband).
 
2013-02-13 11:41:30 PM  

Spaced Cowboy: "Spouse"

Problem solved, outrage avoided.

/dnrtfa
//dnrtft


I AM OUTRAGED!

 not really, but seriously, the ONLY reason they would do this is to "protect" the terms husband and wife from those evil homosexuals.

It is truly unacceptable of the AP.
 
2013-02-14 01:02:17 AM  
I could be wrong, but the way I'm reading it, they are just trying to not accidentally call a spouse by the wrong word.  There are some homosexuals who identify themselves with gender the opposite gender pronouns in a marriage, aren't their?  Some men who call themselves the wife, some women who call themselves the husband?  It seems to be tied up in the traditional roles of the words.  It would be easy, if a little confusing sometimes, to just call all women wives and all men husbands.  That would create some interesting issues with the journalistic tradition of using full first name for first reference and last name or other identifier afterwards.

Traditionally you'd write something like this for first reference:
"Jen Jones and Hank Smith were married last month," or "Jen and Hank Smith were married last month."

For first reference, that still works fine if it's Joe Jones and Hank Smith, but on second reference you might start referring to the them as "the Smiths" or individually by Mrs. Smith or Mr. Smith.  Hard news wouldn't use first names, but a soft feature might.  

It's considered bad form to use a woman's first name in a situation where you would use a man's last name.  Sports journalists used to be famous for screwing that up.  In a marriage with two men or two women, if the couple took one last name, be it hyphenated or just one of their last names, you could run into problems keeping who is who under control, since you might have two Mr. or Mrs. Smiths.  If you say Mr. Smith and his wife, (if the other guy chooses to be the 'wife') then the reader has no idea which one you are talking about.  It may not matter to the reader who has what body parts, but the narrative may fall apart if the reader can't keep who is who apart in their head.  Mr. Smith and his husband is just as confusing if they are both now Mr. Smith.

"Mr. Smith says he loves his husband."  Was that Joe or Hank talking.  Of course, in lots of writing the Mr. or Mrs. is left off, probably because of all the stir over Mrs., Ms., Mz., but it might go back farther than that.  Writing sounds very stilted if you don't change how you identify someone throughout an article.  We are still reeling from 'he or she' vs. 'he/she' vs. 'they'.  This article would have been more useful if they'd suggested an alternative.
 
2013-02-14 01:06:04 PM  

HoratioGates: I could be wrong, but the way I'm reading it, they are just trying to not accidentally call a spouse by the wrong word.  There are some homosexuals who identify themselves with gender the opposite gender pronouns in a marriage, aren't their?  Some men who call themselves the wife, some women who call themselves the husband?  It seems to be tied up in the traditional roles of the words.  It would be easy, if a little confusing sometimes, to just call all women wives and all men husbands.  That would create some interesting issues with the journalistic tradition of using full first name for first reference and last name or other identifier afterwards.

Traditionally you'd write something like this for first reference:
"Jen Jones and Hank Smith were married last month," or "Jen and Hank Smith were married last month."

For first reference, that still works fine if it's Joe Jones and Hank Smith, but on second reference you might start referring to the them as "the Smiths" or individually by Mrs. Smith or Mr. Smith.  Hard news wouldn't use first names, but a soft feature might.  

It's considered bad form to use a woman's first name in a situation where you would use a man's last name.  Sports journalists used to be famous for screwing that up.  In a marriage with two men or two women, if the couple took one last name, be it hyphenated or just one of their last names, you could run into problems keeping who is who under control, since you might have two Mr. or Mrs. Smiths.  If you say Mr. Smith and his wife, (if the other guy chooses to be the 'wife') then the reader has no idea which one you are talking about.  It may not matter to the reader who has what body parts, but the narrative may fall apart if the reader can't keep who is who apart in their head.  Mr. Smith and his husband is just as confusing if they are both now Mr. Smith.

"Mr. Smith says he loves his husband."  Was that Joe or Hank talking.  Of course, in lots of writing the Mr. or Mrs. is left off, probably because of all the stir over Mrs., Ms., Mz., but it might go back farther than that.  Writing sounds very stilted if you don't change how you identify someone throughout an article.  We are still reeling from 'he or she' vs. 'he/she' vs. 'they'.  This article would have been more useful if they'd suggested an alternative.


But how is "Mr. Smith loves his husband" fixed by "Mr. Smith loves his partner"?

That is the issue here.
 
2013-02-14 02:32:09 PM  

chatikh: But how is "Mr. Smith loves his husband" fixed by "Mr. Smith loves his partner"?

That is the issue here.


Mr. Smith loves his top.
 
2013-02-14 03:44:47 PM  

I drunk what: as a child i was repeatedly raped by vanilla


i.dailymail.co.uk

Did he use one of those awards?
 
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