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(Online Shopping Report)   "Password1" remains the most-common password used by middle-aged CEOs, while racist emails that will get their sons fired topped emails sent   (shopathome.com) divider line 57
    More: Obvious, CEO, Trustware, passwords, Android devices, sons  
•       •       •

2227 clicks; posted to Business » on 12 Feb 2013 at 9:59 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-12 09:21:47 PM  
businesses need to understand the unintended risks  that outsourced IT operations can pose as most incidence-response investigations featured third-party vendors a retailer used in cost-cutting measures.
Hahahahahahahahaahashahahawhhaahwhahaha.wha?..waaaa, waaaa, waaaa.

You mean we can't pay people peanuts and also trust them?
 
2013-02-12 09:46:21 PM  
Password security is as easy as 1-2-3-4-5.
 
2013-02-12 10:13:24 PM  

King Something: Password security is as easy as 1-2-3-4-5.


That sounds like a password some idiot would put on their luggage.
 
2013-02-12 10:45:07 PM  
N*Bong*farkedmydaughter would make a good password for those assholes
 
2013-02-12 10:52:38 PM  
leaving employees to set their own passwords is silly if you have an IT dept.
 
2013-02-12 11:00:07 PM  
I think its really cool how Fark protects our passwords with a filter.

***********


Neat.
 
2013-02-12 11:08:56 PM  

Kraftwerk Orange: I think its really cool how Fark protects our passwords with a filter.

***********


Neat.


KfwrkOrangesuckedmydicklastnigt
 
2013-02-12 11:10:18 PM  
Farked after only 265 clicks?
 
2013-02-12 11:34:56 PM  
At one workplace I used a v.inappropriate word as my password.

One day we had problems and the IT dude needed my password. "OH NOES!" I thought.

But because I have MAD THINKING-ON-MY-FEET SKILLZ I slowly spelled the password as he typed, adding random pauses at non syllable breaks.

Then he bursts out laughing.
 
2013-02-12 11:35:22 PM  
As a member of the High Council of Geeks- and I'm a UNIX SysAdmin who, in 2013, still uses vi on a daily basis- let me say this to my brethren who enforce password security:

You can have complex passwords, with lots of capitals, numbers, and special characters. You can have passwords that don't repeat characters when the user changes them, so "PAssword02" isn't followed by "PAssword03". You can have passwords that aren't written on post-it notes, and kept either on the monitor, the bottom of the keyboard, or in the top right-hand desk drawer. You can have passwords that need to change every 120 days.

You get one of these. Choose, and choose wisely. If you try for two of these, over half of your user base won't comply. All four, and I might not comply, simply out of spite. There's got to be a balance between security and functionality.
 
2013-02-12 11:43:11 PM  
how lame

P@ssw0rd1 of course
 
2013-02-12 11:56:09 PM  

Gonz: As a member of the High Council of Geeks- and I'm a UNIX SysAdmin who, in 2013, still uses vi on a daily basis- let me say this to my brethren who enforce password security:

You can have complex passwords, with lots of capitals, numbers, and special characters. You can have passwords that don't repeat characters when the user changes them, so "PAssword02" isn't followed by "PAssword03". You can have passwords that aren't written on post-it notes, and kept either on the monitor, the bottom of the keyboard, or in the top right-hand desk drawer. You can have passwords that need to change every 120 days.

You get one of these. Choose, and choose wisely. If you try for two of these, over half of your user base won't comply. All four, and I might not comply, simply out of spite. There's got to be a balance between security and functionality.


It's really gotten to a ridiculous point - you basically need to either create a spreadsheet, or use a software product, to save your passwords so you don't forget them. Between one site that needs capitals and numbers, another that's only numbers, another that's 8 characters or more, another that's 6 characters... if I signed up for a service that started making me change them every 120 days I'd cancel it.
 
2013-02-12 11:57:46 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com

/ oblig
// and hotlinked
 
2013-02-12 11:58:24 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: N*Bong*farkedmydaughter would make a good password for those assholes


I know what I'm changing my password to.
 
2013-02-12 11:58:49 PM  

Gdiguy: It's really gotten to a ridiculous point - you basically need to either create a spreadsheet, or use a software product, to save your passwords so you don't forget them.


Or you could use something like LastPass! =D
 
2013-02-12 11:59:26 PM  

GranoblasticMan: Gdiguy: It's really gotten to a ridiculous point - you basically need to either create a spreadsheet, or use a software product, to save your passwords so you don't forget them.

Or you could use something like LastPass! =D


Hey, winning at reading comprehension for me!
 
2013-02-13 12:02:31 AM  

Gdiguy: Gonz: As a member of the High Council of Geeks- and I'm a UNIX SysAdmin who, in 2013, still uses vi on a daily basis- let me say this to my brethren who enforce password security:

You can have complex passwords, with lots of capitals, numbers, and special characters. You can have passwords that don't repeat characters when the user changes them, so "PAssword02" isn't followed by "PAssword03". You can have passwords that aren't written on post-it notes, and kept either on the monitor, the bottom of the keyboard, or in the top right-hand desk drawer. You can have passwords that need to change every 120 days.

You get one of these. Choose, and choose wisely. If you try for two of these, over half of your user base won't comply. All four, and I might not comply, simply out of spite. There's got to be a balance between security and functionality.

It's really gotten to a ridiculous point - you basically need to either create a spreadsheet, or use a software product, to save your passwords so you don't forget them. Between one site that needs capitals and numbers, another that's only numbers, another that's 8 characters or more, another that's 6 characters... if I signed up for a service that started making me change them every 120 days I'd cancel it.


All of this. The large number of accounts and passwords I have to have for my work (various credentialing sites) makes it to the point that I have a small notebook that contains all my passwords for everything. I keep the notebook secure, but jeez. Everything makes you login with a unique password. I'd be hard pressed to believe that even security experts use a different 15 character password for every commerce site they use.
 
2013-02-13 12:07:17 AM  
I liked hacking in the 80s.

LOGIN: SYSOP
PASSWORD: GANDALF
 
2013-02-13 12:08:22 AM  
i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-02-13 12:34:18 AM  

Big Ramifications: At one workplace I used a v.inappropriate word as my password.

One day we had problems and the IT dude needed my password. "OH NOES!" I thought.

But because I have MAD THINKING-ON-MY-FEET SKILLZ I slowly spelled the password as he typed, adding random pauses at non syllable breaks.

Then he bursts out laughing.


Aaand favourited.
 
2013-02-13 12:34:54 AM  

GranoblasticMan: GranoblasticMan:

Gdiguy: Gonz: it's really gotten to a ridiculous point - you basically need to either create a spreadsheet, or use a software product, to save your passwords so you don't forget them.

~
~

Pre internet, I worked at a very busy shop for 4 years spanning high school and university. It was a weird "Needful Things" type shop that sold heaps of stuff that peeps needed every day, but also things like Cuban cigars and expensive compass sets.


One day the boss let a cute eccentric old man - a self described inventor - stand on the shop floor and try and flog his password reminder tool.

It was a cardboard pinwheel that had one master password. If you knew the master password then the other 19 passwords fell into place.


I think the poor bugger sold one pinwheel in four hours. I thought he was a freaken legend! For what that's worth.
 
2013-02-13 01:04:53 AM  
battery staple correct horse... no... correct battery staple horse... no... goddammit

/G0dd@mmit69
 
2013-02-13 01:12:45 AM  

Big Ramifications: GranoblasticMan: GranoblasticMan: Gdiguy: Gonz: it's really gotten to a ridiculous point - you basically need to either create a spreadsheet, or use a software product, to save your passwords so you don't forget them.
~
~

Pre internet, I worked at a very busy shop for 4 years spanning high school and university. It was a weird "Needful Things" type shop that sold heaps of stuff that peeps needed every day, but also things like Cuban cigars and expensive compass sets.


One day the boss let a cute eccentric old man - a self described inventor - stand on the shop floor and try and flog his password reminder tool.

It was a cardboard pinwheel that had one master password. If you knew the master password then the other 19 passwords fell into place.


I think the poor bugger sold one pinwheel in four hours. I thought he was a freaken legend! For what that's worth.


What would you have needed with that in the preinternet era?

Granted, I'd pay for that pinwheel now
 
2013-02-13 01:20:10 AM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Farked after only 265 clicks?


That's what they get for outsourcing their IT.
 
2013-02-13 01:36:12 AM  
I make my password the type of porn I most recently watched.

No one will guess "AlbanianClownBukake" as an Amazon password.
 
2013-02-13 02:29:38 AM  

Fano: Big Ramifications: GranoblasticMan: GranoblasticMan: Gdiguy: Gonz: it's really gotten to a ridiculous point - you basically need to either create a spreadsheet, or use a software product, to save your passwords so you don't forget them.
~
~

Pre internet, I worked at a very busy shop for 4 years spanning high school and university. It was a weird "Needful Things" type shop that sold heaps of stuff that peeps needed every day, but also things like Cuban cigars and expensive compass sets.


One day the boss let a cute eccentric old man - a self described inventor - stand on the shop floor and try and flog his password reminder tool.

It was a cardboard pinwheel that had one master password. If you knew the master password then the other 19 passwords fell into place.


I think the poor bugger sold one pinwheel in four hours. I thought he was a freaken legend! For what that's worth.

What would you have needed with that in the preinternet era?

Granted, I'd pay for that pinwheel now

~
Good bloody question! PIN numbers, I think? No pun intended.

Would need to be reworked for X amount of digits, but it would be a simple fix.


// PIN number, tautology, I know
 
2013-02-13 02:33:13 AM  

davidphogan: Smeggy Smurf: N*Bong*farkedmydaughter would make a good password for those assholes

I know what I'm changing my password to.


Nobody is going to guess it.  They'll have to brute force it over the next few million years.  Or hit you over the head with a $5 wrench.
 
2013-02-13 03:11:25 AM  
At the last MSP I worked at, a client CEO requested us to change group policy for their domain so he wouldn't need a password. The client relations person ordered us to go ahead with it over our objections and proof that this was dangerous. "We are in the business to make the client happy"

//worse job I ever had, ever!
 
2013-02-13 06:24:52 AM  
What really grabs my goat at this point are websites that still can't figure out how to safely allow the misc characters in passwords.  Like wow does that ever undermine my confidence in their services and over all abilities.
 
2013-02-13 06:39:32 AM  

BumpInTheNight: What really grabs my goat at this point are websites that still can't figure out how to safely allow the misc characters in passwords.  Like wow does that ever undermine my confidence in their services and over all abilities.


You may like my Password Manifesto.
 
2013-02-13 06:43:27 AM  
24.media.tumblr.com 25.media.tumblr.com
/Babytown frolics
 
2013-02-13 07:21:17 AM  
Here's a password no one will ever guess. Login:. Tee hee!
 
2013-02-13 08:02:50 AM  
Shows what they know, mine is 'Password1!'.
 
2013-02-13 08:25:55 AM  
Many years ago (pre-network) I worked on a stand-alone system that needed a password, so I used "#sand" in the event that they might fire me.

"What's the password?"
"Pound sand"
 
2013-02-13 08:54:26 AM  
I got a secret for you non-IT people.

Next time some smarmy IT guy gives you a hard time about the password policy, ask him how many important network devices he regularly works on like a router or switch or IP gateway that are still using the factory default login.
 
2013-02-13 09:12:44 AM  

Because People in power are Stupid: You mean we can't pay people peanuts and also trust them?


I dated a woman for a while who sold insurance to art galleries and got to meet one of their security experts. He said that almost invariably when he begins an investigation of stolen art, the lowest paid person on the staff is the night security guard.
 
2013-02-13 09:20:13 AM  
What is a hacker unlikely to even think, much less guess that I'd choose?

ihaveasmallpenis
 
2013-02-13 09:27:08 AM  
www.hotflick.net
Someone didn't bother reading my carefully prepared memo on commonly-used passwords. Now, then, as I so meticulously pointed out, the four most-used passwords are: love, sex, secret, and...  God Password1
 
2013-02-13 09:53:25 AM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: I got a secret for you non-IT people.

Next time some smarmy IT guy gives you a hard time about the password policy, ask him how many important network devices he regularly works on like a router or switch or IP gateway that are still using the factory default login.


I'm a smarmy IT guy and all of my devices have the default passwords changed. It's common sense really......more like babytown frolics
 
2013-02-13 10:23:48 AM  

Fano: All of this. The large number of accounts and passwords I have to have for my work (various credentialing sites) makes it to the point that I have a small notebook that contains all my passwords for everything. I keep the notebook secure, but jeez. Everything makes you login with a unique password. I'd be hard pressed to believe that even security experts use a different 15 character password for every commerce site they use.


Yo don't use LDAP ?
 
2013-02-13 10:38:05 AM  

Gonz: As a member of the High Council of Geeks- and I'm a UNIX SysAdmin who, in 2013, still uses vi on a daily basis- let me say this to my brethren who enforce password security:

You can have complex passwords, with lots of capitals, numbers, and special characters. You can have passwords that don't repeat characters when the user changes them, so "PAssword02" isn't followed by "PAssword03". You can have passwords that aren't written on post-it notes, and kept either on the monitor, the bottom of the keyboard, or in the top right-hand desk drawer. You can have passwords that need to change every 120 days.

You get one of these. Choose, and choose wisely. If you try for two of these, over half of your user base won't comply. All four, and I might not comply, simply out of spite. There's got to be a balance between security and functionality.


The problem as stated in the article is that at some level your passwords are being bypassed by that Pakistani SysOp that your hosting company subcontracted to. Thus you can have the best password security in the world -Ashmeed will simply reset it to "AllahAkbar123" and steal your company email.
 
2013-02-13 10:41:40 AM  

Gonz: As a member of the High Council of Geeks- and I'm a UNIX SysAdmin who, in 2013, still uses vi on a daily basis- let me say this to my brethren who enforce password security:


Take it up with the regulation writers, auditors and compliance officers who demand it. I've been trying to push back on many of those things for a long time, with mixed success (short password expirations are my go-to example of counterproductive measures and the difference between "security" and "compliance"). And the only reason I've had as much success as I've had is because we're not in a highly-regulated environment. The other problem is that many legacy systems won't support things like passphrases or let you define many password parameters, so you end up with employees needing seven accounts and passwords, or the most restrictive one becoming the foundation for whatever de facto SSO implementation you use.
 
2013-02-13 11:03:06 AM  
"All passwords must be at least sixteen characters, contain at least two upper-case letters, two lower-case letters, two digits, two special characters, two cuneiform symbols, and three hieroglyphs, no dictionary words, no repeating or consecutive characters, no keyboard patterns, must not be used elsewhere, must be substantially different than any password you've used in the last 1,000 days, and must be changed every 30 days."

...Later:

"Hey, why do these stupid users keep writing down their passwords?"
 
2013-02-13 11:22:23 AM  

Big Ramifications: GranoblasticMan: GranoblasticMan: Gdiguy: Gonz: it's really gotten to a ridiculous point - you basically need to either create a spreadsheet, or use a software product, to save your passwords so you don't forget them.
~
~

Pre internet, I worked at a very busy shop for 4 years spanning high school and university. It was a weird "Needful Things" type shop that sold heaps of stuff that peeps needed every day, but also things like Cuban cigars and expensive compass sets.


One day the boss let a cute eccentric old man - a self described inventor - stand on the shop floor and try and flog his password reminder tool.

It was a cardboard pinwheel that had one master password. If you knew the master password then the other 19 passwords fell into place.


I think the poor bugger sold one pinwheel in four hours. I thought he was a freaken legend! For what that's worth.


I must buy that!
 
2013-02-13 11:34:54 AM  
I once had a password that had to be a minimum of 18 characters long with some stupid rules. My choice: 3ighteenCharacter$

/in your face asinine password requirement
 
2013-02-13 12:33:40 PM  
KeyPass.

that is all.
 
2013-02-13 12:34:15 PM  
or....KeePass actually.
 
2013-02-13 01:21:26 PM  
If anyone ever finds out that all of my user names and passwords are neatly written in the 5 1/2" spiral notepad in my top desk drawer, I'm sunk.
 
2013-02-13 01:32:57 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: I got a secret for you non-IT people.

Next time some smarmy IT guy gives you a hard time about the password policy, ask him how many important network devices he regularly works on like a router or switch or IP gateway that are still using the factory default login.


None, and no IT person I work with currently lets that crap slide, either.

Won't say none ever have, though. Some of my past colleagues have had some real issues with either arrogance or obliviousness when it comes to security.
 
2013-02-13 02:48:11 PM  
CSB time: Once worked in IT for Hallmark Cards. They had a VP there that insisted on Biometrics (finger scanner) for his computer. I thought " This guy probably makes seven figures and he cant remember an 8 digit password WTF???"

Old dude also made his "Administrative Assistant" print out his email...
 
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