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(93.9 MIA)   A hospital? What is it? It's a big building with patients that you go to when you're sick that you have a 20% chance of revisiting a month after you're released, but that's not important right now   (939mia.com) divider line 10
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4831 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Feb 2013 at 12:02 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-12 12:09:45 PM
2 votes:

momalboe: Since my son just died after spending 33 days in the ICU, I am not getting a kick out of these replies. :(


I'm sorry for your loss.

Hospitals are nasty places. I let a neighbor culture my shoes for science class. Shoes I wear to work do not come into the house.
2013-02-12 12:09:34 PM
2 votes:
The "real" money is in treatment, not cure.
Go USA, the most expensive medical care in the world, because you can afford it.
Profiting from human suffering and disease has never been more highly regarded, or so some would have you believe.
farkin' sheeple
2013-02-12 02:00:01 PM
1 votes:

The 4chan Psychiatrist: My favorite experience with regards to readmissions was inpatient medicine at the VA.  We were literally a revolving door for CHF and COPD patients.  The reason being, we were able to restrict their diet on the wards, which largely controlled the CHF exacerbations, and take away their smokes, which controlled the COPD.

When they were discharged, they would resume their unhealthy habits, and thus ensure that they would come back soon.  So, if someone would care to offer a non-totalitarian solution to this problem, and yes, we did inform the patients of the role their habits played in their illnesses, the medical community would appreciate it.


DNRTT, but I'm guessing a surprising number of readmissions are related to things like this as well as not taking their meds properly.  I know of a few hospitals that are working with local pharmacies to help ensure the patient understands their regimen by turning that over to the local pharmacist.  They actually pay the pharmacist to come in, explain the meds, and give them their first fill.  That way they've got a better chance of that patient sticking to it and not coming back.  Financially, this actually costs less than the readmissions, plus patient safety is increased as they're actually doing what they're supposed to.

Doesn't help unhealthy eating habits, though.
2013-02-12 01:42:01 PM
1 votes:

The 4chan Psychiatrist: My favorite experience with regards to readmissions was inpatient medicine at the VA.  We were literally a revolving door for CHF and COPD patients.  The reason being, we were able to restrict their diet on the wards, which largely controlled the CHF exacerbations, and take away their smokes, which controlled the COPD.

When they were discharged, they would resume their unhealthy habits, and thus ensure that they would come back soon.  So, if someone would care to offer a non-totalitarian solution to this problem, and yes, we did inform the patients of the role their habits played in their illnesses, the medical community would appreciate it.


And an even bigger "this" for that post. The CHF patients might as well call ahead to the ER on holidays that center around big meals.
2013-02-12 01:36:26 PM
1 votes:
My favorite experience with regards to readmissions was inpatient medicine at the VA.  We were literally a revolving door for CHF and COPD patients.  The reason being, we were able to restrict their diet on the wards, which largely controlled the CHF exacerbations, and take away their smokes, which controlled the COPD.

When they were discharged, they would resume their unhealthy habits, and thus ensure that they would come back soon.  So, if someone would care to offer a non-totalitarian solution to this problem, and yes, we did inform the patients of the role their habits played in their illnesses, the medical community would appreciate it.
2013-02-12 01:31:58 PM
1 votes:
Hospitals don't admit for trivialities anymore. If you're admitted, you probably have something going on that would kill you without treatment. Is it any wonder then that you're a) probably not going to be completely cured on the first visit, or b) treatment will carry significant risks?
2013-02-12 12:24:00 PM
1 votes:
Something to consider... the statistics might be skewed by the increased octogenarian population.

/translation: old people need more repeat visits to the hospital than younger folks.
2013-02-12 12:12:51 PM
1 votes:
So... repeat business =  high customer satisfaction.

Right?
2013-02-12 12:10:07 PM
1 votes:

momalboe: Since my son just died after spending 33 days in the ICU, I am not getting a kick out of these replies. :(

3.bp.blogspot.com
2013-02-12 12:04:03 PM
1 votes:
You can't have Hospice without Hospital.....
 
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