If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(93.9 MIA)   A hospital? What is it? It's a big building with patients that you go to when you're sick that you have a 20% chance of revisiting a month after you're released, but that's not important right now   (939mia.com) divider line 83
    More: Florida  
•       •       •

4831 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Feb 2013 at 12:02 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



83 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-02-12 02:04:24 PM
Hospital pan, hospital pan
What's it like
It's not important
Hospital pan
 
2013-02-12 02:08:36 PM
What's your vector, victor?

/Gees did no one get the reference in the headline?
//or don't ya speak jive?
 
2013-02-12 02:13:13 PM

Unda: Hospitals don't admit for trivialities anymore. If you're admitted, you probably have something going on that would kill you without treatment. Is it any wonder then that you're a) probably not going to be completely cured on the first visit, or b) treatment will carry significant risks?



Well hopefully these wonderful health institutions have stopped routinely prescribing Proton Pump Inhibitors (Prilosec, Prevacid, Nexium, Aciphex, etc) for virtually every patient they admit.

The increased risk for hospital acquired pneumonia that they cause was needlessly killing about 33,000 Americans every year.


/To your health!
 
2013-02-12 02:21:43 PM
What percentage of those are people in the last third of their life who are now being treated for chronic diseases and losing the battle?

/because those are frequent fliers no matter how good the treatment
 
2013-02-12 02:23:24 PM

The 4chan Psychiatrist: The reason being, we were able to restrict their diet on the wards, which largely controlled the CHF exacerbations.... When they were discharged, they would resume their unhealthy habits, and thus ensure that they would come back soon

.

Did anyone check to see that a CHF diet was available to these people at home? It's not a given. If someone is partially disabled or depending on assistance for food, or just not doing their own shopping and cooking (and I suspect most CHF patients fall into those catigories) then they are likely eating what they are served.

QueenMamaBee: Seriously.... I wish there was a way to ration healthcare without taking it away from those who actually need it. If someone shows up at the ER with a cold or a stubbed toe, the staff should be allowed to punch them. I bet that would cut down on BS visits


My wife just finished working on a hospital readmission reduction program. A few things I gleaned from her sleep-talking... One, there are FAR more readmissions then what the stats show. If you are discharged from a hospital, collapse in the street, and the ambulance takes you to an ER at a different hospital, that isn't counted as a re-admit (it will be in the future, though.)

The readmissions she was working with were things like patients being sent home with prescriptions in bottles written in a language they cannot read, with no instructions or followup. One patient in particular dumped all his meds in a bowl, and whenever he felt bad, he reached in and took a few. Other patients just skipped theirs entirely. Or would choose to buy "food" rather than "Medicine" as it was an either/or proposition for them. Or they couldn't open the bottle. All these readmits were avoidable. None were BS.
 
2013-02-12 02:23:28 PM

Amos Quito: Unda: Hospitals don't admit for trivialities anymore. If you're admitted, you probably have something going on that would kill you without treatment. Is it any wonder then that you're a) probably not going to be completely cured on the first visit, or b) treatment will carry significant risks?


Well hopefully these wonderful health institutions have stopped routinely prescribing Proton Pump Inhibitors (Prilosec, Prevacid, Nexium, Aciphex, etc) for virtually every patient they admit.

The increased risk for hospital acquired pneumonia that they cause was needlessly killing about 33,000 Americans every year.


/To your health!


And you replied to me with that... why?

The difference between science based medicine and all the other crap out there is that science based medicine changes in response to statistically significant data. The only claims to infallibility are come from straw man arguments.
 
2013-02-12 02:32:27 PM

Tran Forsythe: Something to consider... the statistics might be skewed by the increased octogenarian population.

/translation: old people need more repeat visits to the hospital than younger folks.


The more general problem with focus on any given divorced-from-context statistic is that people will try to game the stat. Same as 'No Child Left Behind' or any of a hundred other statistical measures put in by oh-so-clever politicians. I had at least one surgeon bluntly tell my mother, when she was dying of cancer, that'd he'd be willing to do a high-risk surgery on her (very low chance of cure, mostly palliative), but the hospital and insurance weren't going to approve something that might lower their 'stats'.
 
2013-02-12 02:41:42 PM

Shaggy0717: ChipNASA: You can't have Hospice without Hospital.....

wasn't Hospice the name of the long, lost Spice Girl?


I think Ho was the middle name of all 5
 
2013-02-12 02:45:21 PM

basemetal: What percentage of those are people in the last third of their life who are now being treated for chronic diseases and losing the battle?

/because those are frequent fliers no matter how good the treatment


Last third?
90% of all healthcare dollars are spent in the 1st and last years of life.  80% on the last year alone.
 
2013-02-12 02:48:19 PM

DrRatchet: My wife just finished working on a hospital readmission reduction program. A few things I gleaned from her sleep-talking... One, there are FAR more readmissions then what the stats show. If you are discharged from a hospital, collapse in the street, and the ambulance takes you to an ER at a different hospital, that isn't counted as a re-admit (it will be in the future, though.)

The readmissions she was working with were things like patients being sent home with prescriptions in bottles written in a language they cannot read, with no instructions or followup. One patient in particular dumped all his meds in a bowl, and whenever he felt bad, he reached in and took a few. Other patients just skipped theirs entirely. Or would choose to buy "food" rather than "Medicine" as it was an either/or proposition for them. Or they couldn't open the bottle. All these readmits were avoidable. None were BS


During my short stay of working the ER, we had people who would regularly bring in their entire families to be checked out when one had a cold. Or someone would come in when they "felt bad for the past six months." Of course, we also had the druggies who would request Demerol from whoever walked in the door, including housekeeping. I truly wish something could be done for the people like your wife was referring to, instead of wasting good money on people like the ones I mentioned, who were all either Medicaid or hospital charity cases.
 
2013-02-12 02:58:45 PM

Unda: Amos Quito: Unda: Hospitals don't admit for trivialities anymore. If you're admitted, you probably have something going on that would kill you without treatment. Is it any wonder then that you're a) probably not going to be completely cured on the first visit, or b) treatment will carry significant risks?


Well hopefully these wonderful health institutions have stopped routinely prescribing Proton Pump Inhibitors (Prilosec, Prevacid, Nexium, Aciphex, etc) for virtually every patient they admit.

The increased risk for hospital acquired pneumonia that they cause was needlessly killing about 33,000 Americans every year.


/To your health!

And you replied to me with that... why?

The difference between science based medicine and all the other crap out there is that science based medicine changes in response to statistically significant data. The only claims to infallibility are come from straw man arguments.



The post wasn't intended to insult you personally. Please don't misconstrue.

"Science", in it's pure form, is a wonderful thing - unfortunately, this is a rare and elusive creature, as most of what we call "science" is polluted with prejudice, preconceived notions, egos, and the pursuit of fame, power, and the almighty dollar.
 
2013-02-12 03:23:16 PM

Amos Quito: Unda: Amos Quito: Unda: Hospitals don't admit for trivialities anymore. If you're admitted, you probably have something going on that would kill you without treatment. Is it any wonder then that you're a) probably not going to be completely cured on the first visit, or b) treatment will carry significant risks?


Well hopefully these wonderful health institutions have stopped routinely prescribing Proton Pump Inhibitors (Prilosec, Prevacid, Nexium, Aciphex, etc) for virtually every patient they admit.

The increased risk for hospital acquired pneumonia that they cause was needlessly killing about 33,000 Americans every year.


/To your health!

And you replied to me with that... why?

The difference between science based medicine and all the other crap out there is that science based medicine changes in response to statistically significant data. The only claims to infallibility are come from straw man arguments.


The post wasn't intended to insult you personally. Please don't misconstrue.

"Science", in it's pure form, is a wonderful thing - unfortunately, this is a rare and elusive creature, as most of what we call "science" is polluted with prejudice, preconceived notions, egos, and the pursuit of fame, power, and the almighty dollar.


May the Almighty Dollar protect and save us.

Amen.
 
2013-02-12 03:24:25 PM

ChipNASA: saturn badger: ChipNASA: I totally have no idea what I watched but it was oddly funny and odd and funny and odd.

Agreed. Episode two is just as twisted.

OMG there are MANY Llama with Hats.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpjyH-LkEAg

Cruise Ship Edition....these are really odd, strange and funny.


DO NOT miss this one. It is the best I have seen after watching several.

Who likes raw faces?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJixW2u4IvQ
 
2013-02-12 03:28:09 PM

saturn badger: ChipNASA: saturn badger: ChipNASA: I totally have no idea what I watched but it was oddly funny and odd and funny and odd.

Agreed. Episode two is just as twisted.

OMG there are MANY Llama with Hats.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpjyH-LkEAg

Cruise Ship Edition....these are really odd, strange and funny.

DO NOT miss this one. It is the best I have seen after watching several.

Who likes raw faces?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJixW2u4IvQ


I had to find and watch all 5.

Too bad there aren't more.

MOAR Llamas with Hats
 
2013-02-12 03:29:52 PM

saturn badger: ChipNASA: saturn badger: ChipNASA: I totally have no idea what I watched but it was oddly funny and odd and funny and odd.

Agreed. Episode two is just as twisted.

OMG there are MANY Llama with Hats.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpjyH-LkEAg

Cruise Ship Edition....these are really odd, strange and funny.

DO NOT miss this one. It is the best I have seen after watching several.

Who likes raw faces?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJixW2u4IvQ


Obviously there's a miscommunication.
 
2013-02-12 04:19:20 PM

Banned on the Run: basemetal: What percentage of those are people in the last third of their life who are now being treated for chronic diseases and losing the battle?

/because those are frequent fliers no matter how good the treatment

Last third?
90% of all healthcare dollars are spent in the 1st and last years of life.  80% on the last year alone.


The last years of your life are in the final third of your life.....
 
2013-02-12 04:22:48 PM
Fun fact about the US health system -- there are more government-run hospitals in the US (1,253) than there are for-profit hospitals in the US (1,025), but the majority are run by non-profit charities (2,903).

I mean, it could be that these largely non-profit and government-run hospitals in Florida are operating on a profit-based motives that make them want to not cure people or, just maybe, it could be that Florida is full of old people.
 
2013-02-12 04:27:53 PM

ChipNASA: saturn badger: ChipNASA: saturn badger: ChipNASA: I totally have no idea what I watched but it was oddly funny and odd and funny and odd.

Agreed. Episode two is just as twisted.

OMG there are MANY Llama with Hats.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpjyH-LkEAg

Cruise Ship Edition....these are really odd, strange and funny.

DO NOT miss this one. It is the best I have seen after watching several.

Who likes raw faces?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJixW2u4IvQ

I had to find and watch all 5.

Too bad there aren't more.

MOAR Llamas with Hats


I thought it was the Pope that wore funny hats, not the Dalai Llama?
 
2013-02-12 04:32:07 PM
Amos Quito:

The post wasn't intended to insult you personally. Please don't misconstrue.

"Science", in it's pure form, is a wonderful thing - unfortunately, this is a rare and elusive creature, as most of what we call "science" is polluted with prejudice, preconceived notions, egos, and the pursuit of fame, power, and the almighty dollar.


But what is the alternative? All the branches of AltMed are polluted by the same problems to a much worse degree, with none of the benefits of even attempting to collect data to back up their claims. Who on earth better exemplifies "prejudice, preconceived notions, egos, and the pursuit of fame, power, and the almighty dollar " better than charlatans like Burzyski or Mercola or Wakefield?
 
2013-02-12 06:36:48 PM

Amos Quito: So... repeat business =  high customer satisfaction.

Right?


Somewhat. Every patient I've met wants to get home ASAP. However at the same time we get dinged for re-admits. Personally I don't think re-admits are a bad thing. A lot of healing can happen at home and having to re-admit is part of that.

/Most people want to die at home too and not in a hospital.
 
2013-02-12 07:45:08 PM
RULE #1:

GOMERS DON'T DIE
 
2013-02-12 07:52:00 PM
i1171.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-12 09:06:13 PM
I'm a nurse at a long term care/ rehabilitation facility. It's amazing the admits we get from hospitals that have no business being released to us yet. They come with CDiff(even tho the hospital says they tested negative), poor respirations, etc. Its often we have to send them back to the hospital within a week for the same reason they went to begin with.
It's not fair to the patient. When they come to our place to rehab they should be ready not ready enough.
 
2013-02-12 09:37:53 PM
Not trolling here but I seriously do wonder how much of the re-admit is due to the insurance cos pushing hospitals to get people out the door ASAP? The last two surgeries I had were joint related and I was sent home the same day whereas my gall bladder surgery had a three day stay.
 
2013-02-12 10:20:02 PM
QueenMamaBee: ......
Seriously.... I wish there was a way to ration healthcare without taking it away from those who actually need it. If someone shows up at the ER with a cold or a stubbed toe, the staff should be allowed to punch them. I bet that would cut down on BS visits

This!
 
2013-02-12 10:20:38 PM

lyanna96: How large is the elderly population there in Retirement-land?  That's going to inflate their rates.  Also how many people are going to get a free meal (homeless) in their E.R.?  Drug seekers with back pain, finger pain, toe pain, toothache, etc?


HA! Shows what you know! That'd be close to zero. Docs won't let us feed anyone until they've been worked up, and these days the kitchen has very limited hours. If they stick around long enough in the ER they might get graham crackers or saltines, maybe some apple sauce. That's it. That's all I've got for anyone. If I'm really lucky and the stars align, I might have a few bowls of microwave broth available, but the homeless almost never get those.
 
2013-02-12 10:26:46 PM

Unda: Hospitals don't admit for trivialities anymore. If you're admitted, you probably have something going on that would kill you without treatment. Is it any wonder then that you're a) probably not going to be completely cured on the first visit, or b) treatment will carry significant risks?


Mostly correct. More so than used to be, but I still see plenty of WTF admits.
 
2013-02-12 10:33:23 PM

QueenMamaBee: DrRatchet: [www.thegatewaypundit.com image 250x358]

We only know about these hospital readmission rates due to Medicare's Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, which is part of Obamacare. Thanks, Obama!


In figures released last week, the Congressional Budget Office said it had erased hundreds of billions of dollars in projected spending on Medicare and Medicaid. The budget office now projects that spending on those two programs in 2020 will be about $200 billion, or 15 percent, less than it projected three years ago. New data also show overall health care spending growth continuing at the lowest rate in decades for a fourth consecutive year.  -- The Damn' Libtard New York Times

Seriously.... I wish there was a way to ration healthcare without taking it away from those who actually need it. If someone shows up at the ER with a cold or a stubbed toe, the staff should be allowed to punch them. I bet that would cut down on BS visits


If only!
 
2013-02-12 10:34:16 PM

LtDarkstar: What's your vector, victor?

/Gees did no one get the reference in the headline?
//or don't ya speak jive?


You sound like you like movies about gladiators.
 
2013-02-12 10:39:40 PM

meanmutton: Fun fact about the US health system -- there are more government-run hospitals in the US (1,253) than there are for-profit hospitals in the US (1,025), but the majority are run by non-profit charities (2,903).

I mean, it could be that these largely non-profit and government-run hospitals in Florida are operating on a profit-based motives that make them want to not cure people or, just maybe, it could be that Florida is full of old people.


Those "non-profit charities" are run very similarly to for-profit corporations. They operate on profit-based motives.
 
2013-02-12 10:45:16 PM

Medic Zero: lyanna96: How large is the elderly population there in Retirement-land?  That's going to inflate their rates.  Also how many people are going to get a free meal (homeless) in their E.R.?  Drug seekers with back pain, finger pain, toe pain, toothache, etc?

HA! Shows what you know! That'd be close to zero. Docs won't let us feed anyone until they've been worked up, and these days the kitchen has very limited hours. If they stick around long enough in the ER they might get graham crackers or saltines, maybe some apple sauce. That's it. That's all I've got for anyone. If I'm really lucky and the stars align, I might have a few bowls of microwave broth available, but the homeless almost never get those.


I'm sorry to disagree but where I work it's cold and from fall to spring we get homeless who come in two or three times a week with made up complaints that will not preclude them from asking for a sandwich, drink and blanket.
 
2013-02-13 02:33:33 AM
What percentage of hospital readmission are various things might "might" make some interesting reading such as:

% cared for by hospitalists v. private docs
% HMO v non HMO
% Medicaid or indigent v insurance
% under 50 v % over 75 etc and various ages older and younger
% who understood their discharge instructions
% who actually think they got discharge instructions
% smokers
% more than one drink a day alcoholics
% recurrence or nonresolution of the original problem v. a new unrelated problem.
etc

I can't help but wonder if the hospital readmit rates do not need to be studied for subgroupings such as these and not just the broad category
 
2013-02-13 06:35:00 AM
QueenMamaBee:

During my short stay of working the ER, we had people who would regularly bring in their entire families to be checked out when one had a cold. Or someone would come in when they "felt bad for the past six months." Of course, we also had the druggies who would request Demerol from whoever walked in the door, including housekeeping. I truly wish something could be done for the people like your wife was referring to, instead of wasting good money on people like the ones I mentioned, who were all either Medicaid or hospital charity cases.

Many many moons ago when you had to get your primary care doc's permission to go to the ER (for insurance purposes), I worked for a medical answering service.  Every farking Friday night at 6pm on, we'd get multiple calls from people who'd say "I've had a cold/fever/sore throat/stomach ache for 3 days and I have to go to the ER NOW!"

We got yelled at a lot---either from the doctors on call ("don't bother me with those inconsiderate asshats---they could have been seen in the last 3 days during office hours!") or from the patients ("what do you mean he said no?  I've been sick for days!!!").  Urgh.

Hated working Friday nights.
 
Displayed 33 of 83 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report