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(Chronicle Herald)   Mr. Christian seeks answers in hearings regarding sinking of HMS Bounty. This is not a repeat from 1789   (thechronicleherald.ca) divider line 67
    More: Interesting, reward website, The Chronicle Herald, Transportation Safety Board, class president, hearings  
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4899 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Feb 2013 at 11:45 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-12 02:29:29 PM
There was a PBS program aired in the 80s that featured a descendent of Capt. Bligh leading a crew in an attempt to repeat the longboat ordeal. As I recall the Capt.'s relative displayed an almost contemptuous attitude towards his small crew resulting in another mutiny before the end of the voyage.
 
2013-02-12 03:29:47 PM

vernonFL: [encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 225x225]


Well, I have nothing else to ad besides the song running through my head for the rest of the day.
 
2013-02-12 03:43:31 PM

vernonFL: [encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 225x225]


biatch!  you're fast.
 
2013-02-12 04:21:15 PM

jfivealive: Mister Christian oh the time has come


MOTOR INN: what's. your. price. per night?
 
2013-02-12 04:36:44 PM

Krieghund: Two fun facts:

Not to take anything away from subby's great headline: Mr. Christian, the leader of the mutineers, was actually the one that ordered the ship burned in January of 1890.

And the settlement he founded turned into Pedobear's dream resort.


So the spirit ghosts came for one of his females and took her away.
I can see that.
 
2013-02-12 05:24:32 PM
Relevant:  She should have sold shoes!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nY2fxFCyRJA
 
2013-02-12 05:54:40 PM
Daym! That hot island bootay must have been SIZZLING to cause all of this mess.
 
2013-02-12 06:32:54 PM
Fark, you are lettin' me down.

Surely you Farkers GISed Claudene Christian.
Nothing about her looks?
Her evident self-bouyancy?
She was a blond cheerleader, for Fark's sake! With boog hubes!

I know she drowned and all, blah blah blah BUT THIS IS FARK!
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2013-02-12 07:16:36 PM

Krieghund: Mr. Christian, the leader of the mutineers, was actually the one that ordered the ship burned in January of 1890.


Why did he wait over 100 years?

Anyway, I don't believe it. Here she is in Hong Kong just last month.
fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net
 
2013-02-12 08:14:08 PM

shanteyman: Bounty should never have gone to sea. Her captain exhibited gross negligence in doing so. I've sailed with Captain Jan Miles of Pride of Baltimore II and if you've read the article from Outside Magazine, you  know that even he, an extremely experienced square-rig sailor, thought it was stupid for Bounty to sail. They could've waited two to three days and gotten the benefit of the wind without the danger.

On top of sailing out, Walbridge turned directly at and sailed towards the storm, in hopes of skirting it and using its winds to get him to St. Petersburg, Fla. for a deadline. He recklessly  disregarded  the safety of his crew and his vessel, his two top priorities, and it cost him and Ms. Christian their lives. The ship was woefully undermanned and her engines and generators weren't in the best condition. She'd been operating on a shoestring budget for years.


Yeah, anyone associated with Pride of Baltimore II are all too familiar with what happens to a ship when you get hit by a squall even when you do everything right - what Walbridge did was beyond reckless, especially when his first mate told him it was a bad idea.

/listen to your farking XO
 
2013-02-12 11:04:59 PM
 
2013-02-12 11:41:07 PM

Mojongo: The original Bounty was lost due to a mutiny and the replica sank for the lack of one.


 I shouldn't have laughed...

 ...but I did.

/dang I hadn't even thought of that...
 
2013-02-12 11:52:52 PM

Ishkur: What I find amazing is Bligh's escape.

In a little dingy with some loyal comrades, he somehow navigates 2000 miles over a period of two weeks back to civilization (Australia). Say what you want about the man, that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.


IIRC, he wasn't such a bad man. It may have been from Richard Shenkman's Legends, Lies, and Myths of World History, but his real problem was that he was too soft on the men. For instance, they landed on Tahiti or some such and the men were having such a good time drilling the native women that when it came time to leave, they got mutinous.
 
2013-02-13 06:18:14 AM
I hope Walbridge's soul rests in hell and his body was horrendously treated by the sea.
 
2013-02-13 03:15:41 PM

puffy999: I hope Walbridge's soul rests in hell and his body was horrendously treated by the sea.



I can see your point about him deserving to be mangled and tortured for all eternity, but I think it's just a little bit extreme.  Planet of the Apes wasn't THAT bad...


...Oh, sorry, I mis-read that.  Never mind.
 
2013-02-13 04:59:59 PM

Fano: IIRC, he wasn't such a bad man. It may have been from Richard Shenkman's Legends, Lies, and Myths of World History, but his real problem was that he was too soft on the men. For instance, they landed on Tahiti or some such and the men were having such a good time drilling the native women that when it came time to leave, they got mutinous.


I saw a documentary on the Canadian history channel last year where one of Blighs descendants did some searching since he wanted to find the real story. You are exactly right, the records show that Bligh was preetty easy on his men compared to other captains (comparing whippings for punishment). But I guess Fletcher Christian had friends in the right places who could spin the story to make him look good. Then a book got published with that version of the story and that is what got used for the movies.
 
2013-02-13 05:01:37 PM

shanteyman: Bligh had previously sailed with Captain James Cook during one of his voyages to the South Seas. He was known as an excellent sailr and first rate navigator. The voyage in the longboat to Jakarta is probably the greatest open boat voyage in history. Only Shackleton's experience in the Antarctic comes as close for epicness.


Have you ever heard of what happened to the survivors of the wreck of the Whale Ship Essex? They were in the middle of the pacific when a whale destroyed their ship. They I think had more men in 2 boats with less food and supplies than Bligh. They sailed farther to reach south american, and had to turn to cannibalism to survive.
 
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