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(Chronicle Herald)   Mr. Christian seeks answers in hearings regarding sinking of HMS Bounty. This is not a repeat from 1789   (thechronicleherald.ca) divider line 67
    More: Interesting, reward website, The Chronicle Herald, Transportation Safety Board, class president, hearings  
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4904 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Feb 2013 at 11:45 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-12 10:09:12 AM  
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2013-02-12 10:09:57 AM  
Still waiting on word from Sister Ch...

vernonFL: [encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 225x225]


dammit
 
2013-02-12 11:39:37 AM  
i.imgur.com

R.I.P. SISTER CHR.....DAMMIT!

 
2013-02-12 11:47:04 AM  
Clearly it was mutiny.
 
2013-02-12 11:47:30 AM  
Yeah, I thought I would be in here first with that one.

Guess not.

/motorin'
 
2013-02-12 11:49:34 AM  

vernonFL: [encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 225x225]


For some reason, I REALLY hate that song.
 
2013-02-12 11:49:34 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-12 11:49:36 AM  
Cue the sound of Mel Gibson screaming obscenities
 
2013-02-12 11:54:20 AM  

Claudene Christian aboard the Bounty on July 27, 2012. She died when the ship sank in October.


WTH? I thought the ship sank in the ocean, and now they're saying it sank in October. WHICH IS IT??
 
2013-02-12 11:55:34 AM  
Hack, that's fantastic ! Bugs doing his best Charles Laughton
 
2013-02-12 11:56:13 AM  
Watched a guy in the rigging on a four-masted tall ship on a cold Thanksgiving day hanging christmas lights.   The ship was anchored and super secured to a pier as a restaurant.  Calm wind.  He had two safety harnesses.   It was powerfully scary to watch and imagine people did that (except the lights) on both calm and heavy seas.

A tall ship in a hurricane with winds from the west and north as well has got to be well worth missing.
 
2013-02-12 11:56:35 AM  
The only ones with answers are the crew. Why were they at sea in the first place? Other ships moved up rivers to safe harbors. We watched a long line of barges and tugboats move north up the Hudson River days before Sandy hit. Who was on the helm? Who gave the order to abandon ship?
 
2013-02-12 11:57:42 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org
Does not approve
 
2013-02-12 11:59:46 AM  
Mister Christian oh the time has come
 
2013-02-12 12:00:40 PM  
"Today, after driving more than 2,000 kilometres from their home in Oklahoma to Virginia, her mother and father will enter a conference room in a Portsmouth hotel and begin the painful process of trying to find out why the Bounty sank, and why their daughter - their only child - died."

It sank because the genious captiain tried to sail it to safety during a hurricane.  She died because hurricanes are generally bad for people on old timey boats.  I just saved them a bunch of money.  INVESTIGATION COMPLETE!
 
2013-02-12 12:01:20 PM  
Outside Magazine has a 14-page, in-depth look at the boat's sinking

Link
 
2013-02-12 12:02:13 PM  
Is HMS Bounty a scandal yet?
 
2013-02-12 12:04:33 PM  
Yes, we need an investigation and a lot of lawyers, since being in a hurricane could not possibly have had any thing to do with the wreck of the Bounty.
 
2013-02-12 12:05:52 PM  
Was he the very model of a modern major-general?
 
2013-02-12 12:07:27 PM  

LarryDan43: Is HMS Bounty a scandal yet?


only due to the fact it is the thicker quicker picker upper!
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-02-12 12:07:53 PM  

Head_Shot: Was he the very model of a modern major-general?


I thought he built a better model than the one at Data General?
 
2013-02-12 12:13:04 PM  

JackieRabbit: Yes, we need an investigation and a lot of lawyers, since being in a hurricane could not possibly have had any thing to do with the wreck of the Bounty.


That, being horribly undermanned, and having hands on board who couldn't hand, reef, or steer.  This ship should have been laid up with her yards struck down on deck, rather than at sea.
 
2013-02-12 12:13:05 PM  
The original Bounty was lost due to a mutiny and the replica sank for the lack of one.
 
2013-02-12 12:16:48 PM  

vernonFL:


Oh, his time has... dammit.
 
2013-02-12 12:20:30 PM  
I know several mariners in the tall ships community, and every one of them has said that the captain had a reputation as reckless and dangerous. Bounty should never have sailed south. Hell, it should never have left port; the Coast Guard's tall ship Eagle was right next to Bounty; it stayed put and was just fine.

A person is dead because of the captain's gross negligence; the least the Coast Guard can do is make as public an example of this disaster for other and future captains.
 
2013-02-12 12:20:54 PM  
Excellent headline, subby!
 
2013-02-12 12:22:11 PM  
www.thesexcarnival.com
Meanwhile below deck...
 
2013-02-12 12:28:41 PM  
 
2013-02-12 12:32:40 PM  

xanadian: Still waiting on word from Sister Ch...

vernonFL: [encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 225x225]

dammit


This.
 
2013-02-12 12:35:05 PM  
moviesmedia.ign.com

Admiral Kirk should not have flown so close to the water while an energy-draining probe was overhead.
 
2013-02-12 12:45:06 PM  

Mojongo: The original Bounty was lost due to a mutiny and the replica sank for the lack of one.


The take away is, if you have a boat do not name it Bounty.
 
2013-02-12 12:51:53 PM  
What I find amazing is Bligh's escape.

In a little dingy with some loyal comrades, he somehow navigates 2000 miles over a period of two weeks back to civilization (Australia). Say what you want about the man, that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.
 
2013-02-12 12:53:27 PM  

Ishkur: What I find amazing is Bligh's escape.

In a little dingy with some loyal comrades, he somehow navigates 2000 miles over a period of two weeks back to civilization (Australia). Say what you want about the man, that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.


No doubt, and still considered one of the greatest examples of human-brain-powered navigation in human history.
 
2013-02-12 12:54:34 PM  

UNC_Samurai: I know several mariners in the tall ships community, and every one of them has said that the captain had a reputation as reckless and dangerous. Bounty should never have sailed south. Hell, it should never have left port; the Coast Guard's tall ship Eagle was right next to Bounty; it stayed put and was just fine.

A person is dead because of the captain's gross negligence; the least the Coast Guard can do is make as public an example of this disaster for other and future captains.


Hear, hear.

When I first heard the news that it was lost, I thought, what the hell were they doing out to sea in a farking hurricane?  It's not like people hadn't been shouting SUPERSTORM, PANIC for about a week before hand.  Shoulda been tied up at the pier.
 
2013-02-12 01:01:40 PM  
Ishkur: What I find amazing is Bligh's escape.

In a little dingy with some loyal comrades, he somehow navigates 2000 miles over a period of two weeks back to civilization (Australia). Say what you want about the man, that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.



Actually, he navigated after the mutiney from the South Pacific to Batavia (present day Jakarta, Indonesia) not Australia.  Still, these are amazing distances in basically a rowboat.
 
2013-02-12 01:03:20 PM  
If you're a lawyer, or considering a career in law, one of the words to use when describing what you do should probably not be 'ferret'.

/just saying
 
2013-02-12 01:03:52 PM  

stuffy: [www.thesexcarnival.com image 600x600]
Meanwhile below deck...


Who could forget the great movie filmed aboard that fine ship.
 
2013-02-12 01:07:00 PM  

HenryFnord: If you're a lawyer, or considering a career in law, one of the words to use when describing what you do should probably not be 'ferret'.

/just saying


True.  Just go with the facts and say "weasel."
 
2013-02-12 01:08:43 PM  

SirEattonHogg: Actually, he navigated after the mutiney from the South Pacific to Batavia (present day Jakarta, Indonesia) not Australia. Still, these are amazing distances in basically a rowboat.


Thank you. Mostly recalling from memory, to lazy to google the exact distance and destination so I ballparked it.
 
2013-02-12 01:23:18 PM  

Ishkur: SirEattonHogg: Actually, he navigated after the mutiney from the South Pacific to Batavia (present day Jakarta, Indonesia) not Australia. Still, these are amazing distances in basically a rowboat.

Thank you. Mostly recalling from memory, to lazy to google the exact distance and destination so I ballparked it.


I thought it was Timor?
 
2013-02-12 01:26:22 PM  
Bounty should never have gone to sea. Her captain exhibited gross negligence in doing so. I've sailed with Captain Jan Miles of Pride of Baltimore II and if you've read the article from Outside Magazine, you  know that even he, an extremely experienced square-rig sailor, thought it was stupid for Bounty to sail. They could've waited two to three days and gotten the benefit of the wind without the danger.

On top of sailing out, Walbridge turned directly at and sailed towards the storm, in hopes of skirting it and using its winds to get him to St. Petersburg, Fla. for a deadline. He recklessly  disregarded  the safety of his crew and his vessel, his two top priorities, and it cost him and Ms. Christian their lives. The ship was woefully undermanned and her engines and generators weren't in the best condition. She'd been operating on a shoestring budget for years.
 
2013-02-12 01:29:46 PM  

Ebenator: Outside Magazine has a 14-page, in-depth look at the boat's sinking

Link


I can't imagine going through that. Thanks for the link.
 
2013-02-12 01:30:09 PM  

Big Man On Campus: Ishkur: What I find amazing is Bligh's escape.

In a little dingy with some loyal comrades, he somehow navigates 2000 miles over a period of two weeks back to civilization (Australia). Say what you want about the man, that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.

No doubt, and still considered one of the greatest examples of human-brain-powered navigation in human history.


Nothing in his treatment of the Bounty crew was even slightly out of the ordinary for those times.  Christian and his followers were seduced by Tahiti, and mutinied.  Putting the non-mutineers to sea like that was close to murder.
 
2013-02-12 01:32:08 PM  

Ishkur: What I find amazing is Bligh's escape.

In a little dingy with some loyal comrades, he somehow navigates 2000 miles over a period of two weeks back to civilization (Australia). Say what you want about the man, that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.


And after enduring such hardship, brought several of the people who rowed that boat up on charges.Not to mention that when he was posted to Australia, later, his people mutinied on him again.
 
2013-02-12 01:38:04 PM  
that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.

Bligh had previously sailed with Captain James Cook during one of his voyages to the South Seas. He was known as an excellent sailr and first rate navigator. The voyage in the longboat to Jakarta is probably the greatest open boat voyage in history. Only Shackleton's experience in the Antarctic comes as close for epicness.

Bligh's people skills weren't the best. When he was Governor of Australia there was mutiny , too.
 
2013-02-12 01:38:34 PM  

mainsail: Ishkur: What I find amazing is Bligh's escape.

In a little dingy with some loyal comrades, he somehow navigates 2000 miles over a period of two weeks back to civilization (Australia). Say what you want about the man, that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.

And after enduring such hardship, brought several of the people who rowed that boat up on charges.Not to mention that when he was posted to Australia, later, his people mutinied on him again.


Well, Australia was its own hard-case.  The army there was completely corrupted.  However, I think he might have been involved in the Nore mutiny, but so were a lot of other captains.  His battle and sailing capacities, however, were supposedly excellent.
 
2013-02-12 01:49:17 PM  

Dimensio: [moviesmedia.ign.com image 480x358]

Admiral Kirk should not have flown so close to the water while an energy-draining probe was overhead.


He didn't, it was Sulu.

/ Why yes, I am a nerd.
 
2013-02-12 01:50:17 PM  
Two fun facts:

Not to take anything away from subby's great headline: Mr. Christian, the leader of the mutineers, was actually the one that ordered the ship burned in January of 1890.

And the settlement he founded turned into Pedobear's dream resort.
 
2013-02-12 01:54:33 PM  

Ishkur: What I find amazing is Bligh's escape.

In a little dingy with some loyal comrades, he somehow navigates 2000 miles over a period of two weeks back to civilization (Australia). Say what you want about the man, that is some bad-ass, brass-balled seamanship.


i105.photobucket.com
Oh yeah?  Try doing it with frostbite, tough guy.

/jk, Bligh was a bad-ass
 
2013-02-12 02:06:46 PM  
HMS Bounty? The Queen sent her fleet to the U.S?
 
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