If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   Gallery of what a clear night sky over major cities would look like without light pollution   (nytimes.com) divider line 6
    More: Interesting, light pollution, night sky  
•       •       •

5837 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Feb 2013 at 6:02 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-02-12 08:59:23 AM
1 votes:

mr_a: PC LOAD LETTER: Or he could have time traveled to 2003 and taken some shots in NYC during the blackout.

I think you'd also need to turn off every car engine and smokestack for about a year or so, and maybe all sources of artificial heat which puts moisture into the atmosphere.


This. I remember it being typical August heat/haze during the '03 blackout, so there wasn't much to see in the sky.

And as somebody who leaves for work at 3:35 in the morning...muthaFARK light pollution. At that hour your shiatty little carpet store does not need to be lit up inside and out like Caesar's farking Palace, with 2/3 of the lighting bleeding out sideways right into the eyes of drivers like me, from whom you will be getting NO business. (good DAY sir)

And everybody who's paranoid about burglars and has their house lit up 24/7...that's bullshiat too.

Much so-called security lighting is designed with little thought for how eyes-or criminals-operate. Marcus Felson, a professor at the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University, has concluded that lighting is effective in preventing crime mainly if it enables people to notice criminal activity as it's taking place, and if it doesn't help criminals to see what they're doing. Bright, unshielded floodlights-one of the most common types of outdoor security lighting in the country-often fail on both counts, as do all-night lights installed on isolated structures or on parts of buildings that can't be observed by passersby (such as back doors). A burglar who is forced to use a flashlight, or whose movement triggers a security light controlled by an infrared motion sensor, is much more likely to be spotted than one whose presence is masked by the blinding glare of a poorly placed metal halide "wall pack." In the early seventies, the public-school system in San Antonio, Texas, began leaving many of its school buildings, parking lots, and other property dark at night and found that the no-lights policy not only reduced energy costs but also dramatically cut vandalism.
2013-02-12 08:40:12 AM
1 votes:

jfarkinB: All the same, fark light pollution. My kids have never seen truly dark skies. Forty years ago, it was easy to see the Milky Way even in suburbia.


On a boating trip in southern Missouri, we were able to see the Milky Way perfectly in the sky, with enough light to easily see most objects around us at midnight without an artifical light source. Fifty miles away later that same night, there was not a star to be seen in the sky due to the light pollution from a small town a few miles away. It's really crazy how much poorly directed light we use at night.
2013-02-12 08:31:10 AM
1 votes:
Gallery of what a clear night sky over major cities would look like without light pollution

...and a several-minute exposure at high ISO.

With normal 20/20 vision and fully dark-adapted eyes, you'll find maybe 3,000 stars naked-eye visible from any one spot at any one time, max. It's beautiful and impressive, but no, it doesn't look like this.

All the same, fark light pollution. My kids have never seen truly dark skies. Forty years ago, it was easy to see the Milky Way even in suburbia.
2013-02-12 06:37:09 AM
1 votes:
By the weirdest coincidence I am at this moment stacking some milky way pics I just finished taking. Should be better than his crappy ones so hah.

The pics are just badly done, and its ridiculous to suggest people will see colourful patches in the milky way... the human eye cannot see that.

However the sky in a dark clear place does look astonishing, and you can see most of what is in the less fanciful pics (something like picture 8 is not so far off) just never ever in colour.
2013-02-12 06:05:30 AM
1 votes:
Fark! Now I am going to have that song in my head all day!

/paint your palet blue and grey
//sit out on a summers day...
2013-02-12 12:02:19 AM
1 votes:
Or he could have time traveled to 2003 and taken some shots in NYC during the blackout.
 
Displayed 6 of 6 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report