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(Patch)   Virginia House passes a "Tebow Bill" which will allow talented homeschool students to warm the benches for mediocre public school athletes   (ashburn.patch.com) divider line 130
    More: Interesting, Tim Tebow, athlete of the year, school sports, Senate, delegated voting, Albemarle County, Loudoun, Virginia Department of Education  
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1023 clicks; posted to Sports » on 11 Feb 2013 at 12:58 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-11 09:56:38 AM
They maybe could compete as part of a homeschool team or something. There seems something fundamentally wrong about playing for a school that you are not enrolled at. Lots of opportunities for abuse too.
 
2013-02-11 09:59:33 AM
"I should be able to choose whether my kids play sports or not," said Brad Foster, the father of five athletic home-schooled boys in Culpeper.

You can and apparently already have.
 
2013-02-11 10:23:08 AM

kronicfeld: "I should be able to choose whether my kids play sports or not," said Brad Foster, the father of five athletic home-schooled boys in Culpeper.

You can and apparently already have.


Really. I have a 5 year old daughter and she goes to public school. My reason for this decision has NOTHING to do with education, she is already WAY above what they are teaching her. But she makes friends. She's starting soccer in the spring, she's in Girl Scouts. These are the opportunities that home schooled children just miss out on.
 
2013-02-11 10:30:13 AM
Compared to some of the other stupid sh*t that's come out of that region lately this seems pretty tame
 
2013-02-11 10:40:07 AM
Is someone in the VA legislature trying to get their homeschooled nephew or grandkid into high school sports or something? The bill as passed has an amendment that says its provisions will expire July 1, 2018.
 
2013-02-11 10:43:15 AM
Meh. Tebow would be the exception not the rule here. Most home-schooled kids are going to get pummeled by the mean public-school kids.
 
2013-02-11 10:46:49 AM
I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians (Tebow). The reason being they don't want their kids exposed to all that liberal evolutionist talk and teh gheys.
 
2013-02-11 10:52:00 AM
I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians (Tebow). I may be alright with this if it opens the eyes of some of these sheltered kids.
 
2013-02-11 10:55:44 AM

PreMortem: I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians


Quite a few. I'm looking forward to the first few lawsuits coming down the pike when homeschooling parents are outraged that their children aren't permitted to lead the team in on-field prayer prior to the start of the game, or sew crosses onto their uniforms. I give it about 6 months, maybe a year.
 
2013-02-11 11:02:04 AM

PreMortem: I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians (Tebow). The reason being they don't want their kids exposed to all that liberal evolutionist talk and teh gheys.


Several people in the church I grew up in homeschooled their kids for religious purposes and to protect them from "the world". Ghey liberal evolutionism was definitely a fear of theirs, but they also wanted to protect their precious angels from things like  curse words, dirty talk, and bullies...which of course they will never encounter in public school sports.
 
2013-02-11 11:07:07 AM

kid_icarus: which of course they will never encounter in public school sports


Or the world beyond school.

/can't be sheltered forever
 
2013-02-11 11:10:52 AM

nekom: Really. I have a 5 year old daughter and she goes to public school. My reason for this decision has NOTHING to do with education, she is already WAY above what they are teaching her. But she makes friends. She's starting soccer in the spring, she's in Girl Scouts. These are the opportunities that home schooled children just miss out on.


I'm fairly sure you don't have to be in public school to be in Girl Scouts. You dont have to be for Boy Scouts I know that for a fact.

Both my boy play hockey and the league has nothing to do with school. But it's hockey in Oklahoma there isn't enough demand for it to be in the public schools.

Well, they have varsity level now.
 
2013-02-11 11:12:22 AM

PreMortem: I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians (Tebow). I may be alright with this if it opens the eyes of some of these sheltered kids.


I only knew two home school families in my parent's neighborhood growing up. Both of them were fundies who didn't want their children exposed to the horrors that are public schools. One of them were my next door neighbords. Nice people, but very weird. The funny thing is the parents never clued in that their god-children were hanging out with neighborhood heathens already polluted by the vile sickness that is public schools.

I like to think we exposed them to the real world and actually gave them a shot of growing up somewhat normal.
 
2013-02-11 11:14:01 AM
This is so farking stupid on so many levels it's infuriating.
 
2013-02-11 11:27:28 AM

PreMortem: I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians (Tebow).


I actually know homeschooling parents that aren't Christian, so I know its not universal. That said, I have no idea what the actual percentages might be.
 
2013-02-11 11:32:25 AM

SilentStrider: PreMortem: I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians (Tebow).

I actually know homeschooling parents that aren't Christian, so I know its not universal. That said, I have no idea what the actual percentages might be.


It's got to be a pretty high percentage.
 
2013-02-11 11:34:28 AM

SilentStrider: PreMortem: I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians (Tebow).

I actually know homeschooling parents that aren't Christian, so I know its not universal. That said, I have no idea what the actual percentages might be.


I have neighbors who are hardcore liberal and home-school their kids purely for academic reasons (the public schools around here suck), so secular homeschoolers do exist...however from my experience I would definitely say they are overwhelmingly the exception not the rule. Go to a homeschool convention (I have)...most of the crowd there is hardcore fundamentalist Christian. The weird kind. You'll find lots of booths set of for "Christian-based curriculum" and such.
 
2013-02-11 11:34:30 AM

The Stealth Hippopotamus:
I'm fairly sure you don't have to be in public school to be in Girl Scouts. You dont have to be for Boy Scouts I know that for a fact.

Both my boy play hockey and the league has nothing to do with school. But it's hockey in Oklahoma there isn't enough demand for it to be in the public schools.

Well, they have varsity level now.


No, I don't think you have to for the Girl Scouts, so that's a bad example, but the general socializing is the real benefit of public school. Every home schooled person I ever met was both smart and socially inept. It is my opinion that if you try to shelter your child, it's just going to be 10 times harder when they finally do leave and reality smacks them in the mouth. The extra-curricular activities that public schools offer are just the icing on the cake.
 
2013-02-11 11:46:37 AM

Pocket Ninja: PreMortem: I wonder what percentage of home-schoolers are fundie Christians

Quite a few. I'm looking forward to the first few lawsuits coming down the pike when homeschooling parents are outraged that their children aren't permitted to lead the team in on-field prayer prior to the start of the game, or sew crosses onto their uniforms. I give it about 6 months, maybe a year.


Haven't been to a high school football game in the south have you? Hell, the coach leads the team in a prayer. Not to mention prayer or moment of silence over the PA system before the game begins, Check out some of the college coaches -- they will preach in a recruits church.
 
2013-02-11 11:47:12 AM
i232.photobucket.com


/I thought this was mandatory in all homeschool threads.
 
2013-02-11 11:51:52 AM

GAT_00: This is so farking stupid on so many levels it's infuriating.


How so?  The parents are already paying property taxes, which a portion of that money goes to the public school system, so there really isnt a financial burden to the school.

Personally, I see no problem with this.

Educate me on why you think that this is a bad idea
 
2013-02-11 12:02:18 PM

Endive Wombat: GAT_00: This is so farking stupid on so many levels it's infuriating.

How so?  The parents are already paying property taxes, which a portion of that money goes to the public school system, so there really isnt a financial burden to the school.

Personally, I see no problem with this.

Educate me on why you think that this is a bad idea


And they chose not to be a part of the school system.  You don't get to pick and choose what part of the school system you get to use.  What's next, the ability to opt out of all science classes on the grounds of religion?  Pick and choose for yourself what classes are required to graduate high school?
 
2013-02-11 12:07:27 PM

Endive Wombat: GAT_00: This is so farking stupid on so many levels it's infuriating.

How so?  The parents are already paying property taxes, which a portion of that money goes to the public school system, so there really isnt a financial burden to the school.

Personally, I see no problem with this.

Educate me on why you think that this is a bad idea


I dunno...I don't really have a personal problem with it, per se. It's just I always thought if you were going to represent a school as a student athlete it was generally assumed you had to be enrolled as a student at that school. That's kinda the whole point. If you think public schools are inadequate for your snowflake that's fine , but I think by not enrolling them you're resigning access to all the school's services and benefits. Including sports.
 
2013-02-11 12:10:04 PM

nekom: No, I don't think you have to for the Girl Scouts, so that's a bad example, but the general socializing is the real benefit of public school. Every home schooled person I ever met was both smart and socially inept. It is my opinion that if you try to shelter your child, it's just going to be 10 times harder when they finally do leave and reality smacks them in the mouth. The extra-curricular activities that public schools offer are just the icing on the cake.


Well most smart people are socially inept. Goes for both public and home schooled. My brother is a great example. Public schooled his entire life socially inept his entire life graduated with a PhD in Statistics from Iowa State.

Makes more money than a rockstar but he isn't the life of the party .
 
2013-02-11 12:12:45 PM

Endive Wombat: The parents are already paying property taxes, which a portion of that money goes to the public school system, so there really isnt a financial burden to the school.


If the schools are funded in the same way most state-run schools are funded, the money the school/district receives is based on enrollment. The school likely isn't getting money to pay for some kid who doesn't attend to play sports even if his parents are paying taxes, which is why the bill allows the school to charge a fee for participation. But I tend to agree with one of the legislators from Virginia. Public school isn't "a la carte". If you don't want to send your kids to public school, that's your prerogative, but don't come tell me that you don't want to allow your kids in the classrooms but you would really like them to play sports, go to prom, be on the yearbook staff, participate in math club, etc.
 
2013-02-11 12:15:16 PM

kid_icarus: I dunno...I don't really have a personal problem with it, per se. It's just I always thought if you were going to represent a school as a student athlete it was generally assumed you had to be enrolled as a student at that school. That's kinda the whole point. If you think public schools are inadequate for your snowflake that's fine , but I think by not enrolling them you're resigning access to all the school's services and benefits. Including sports.


Great point. If they would let you out of paying property taxes. But I've never heard of a city government letting anyone out of paying for a school just because their child doesn't attend that school. I know it's cliche but they're paying for it so they should have access to it.
 
2013-02-11 12:23:22 PM

exick: If the schools are funded in the same way most state-run schools are funded, the money the school/district receives is based on enrollment. The school likely isn't getting money to pay for some kid who doesn't attend to play sports even if his parents are paying taxes, which is why the bill allows the school to charge a fee for participation. But I tend to agree with one of the legislators from Virginia. Public school isn't "a la carte". If you don't want to send your kids to public school, that's your prerogative, but don't come tell me that you don't want to allow your kids in the classrooms but you would really like them to play sports, go to prom, be on the yearbook staff, participate in math club, etc.


The percentages are based on enrollment. So the local government get X number of dollars and if school A has 50% of the kids than school A gets 50% of the cash.

All for the good of the school, all for the good of the schooooolll.

Now I have Pump up the Volume stuck in my head.
 
2013-02-11 12:24:09 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus:
Well most smart people are socially inept. Goes for both public and home schooled. My brother is a great example. Public schooled his entire life socially inept his entire life graduated with a PhD in Statistics from Iowa State.

Makes more money than a rockstar but he isn't the life of the party .


Well, that's certainly true to some extent. High intelligence seems to often be paired with general social akwardness, or even autism or other disorders. Home schooling does nothing to help that though.

As much as I want my daughter to know that she is the most important person in the world to me, I also want her to know that out in the greater world she's just one of many. I want her to have a rich array of life long friends, and without public school, I don't know how she would get that, especially living here in the rural countryside.
 
2013-02-11 12:26:27 PM
I would be willing to bet that a lot of the home-school kids are very unhappy with being homeschooled. I can't imagine what it would have been like to be isolated and 'different' as a kid. I'm very socially inept and isolated as an adult and I can't imagine it would be any better for me if I had been further isolated.

I played hockey, soccer, varsity football, I competed in track, and skiing and I still grew up to be a loner nerd.
 
2013-02-11 12:30:56 PM

GAT_00: Endive Wombat: GAT_00: This is so farking stupid on so many levels it's infuriating.

How so?  The parents are already paying property taxes, which a portion of that money goes to the public school system, so there really isnt a financial burden to the school.

Personally, I see no problem with this.

Educate me on why you think that this is a bad idea

And they chose not to be a part of the school system.  You don't get to pick and choose what part of the school system you get to use.  What's next, the ability to opt out of all science classes on the grounds of religion?  Pick and choose for yourself what classes are required to graduate high school?


I see what you are saying, but I think this is where we differ - I do no view sports as education.  I view them as a extracurricular, sponsored and hosted by the school.  I was in cross county and track.  I was never given homework, tests, exams, finals, etc.  Sure, you may learn how to properly lift weights, stretch, run certain plays, etc with team sports, but there is little no actual educational value from playing a sport.  Am I making any sense or am I coming out of left field with my views?
 
2013-02-11 12:37:35 PM

nekom: especially living here in the rural countryside.


ahhhh yeah. You got two options church or school.

Egoy3k: I would be willing to bet that a lot of the home-school kids are very unhappy with being homeschooled.


haha I bet a lot of public school kids are very unhappy with being public schooled. Can I use public school as a verb? Well I just did.

Egoy3k: I'm very socially inept and isolated as an adult and I can't imagine it would be any better for me if I had been further isolated.


So public school didn't make you a social butterfly? But I thought that was one of the many things that public school was suppose to do! We all know public school isn't there to offer a superior education in the fundamentals of learning. That's what private schools are there for.

We all know why public schools were started. Our country needed farm kids turned into a populace that could work long hours in a factory setting. And it's a mind set that is still in force today. Either we need to change that paradigm or we are going to lose more and more kids to home schooling or private schools. Just for full disclosure both of my kids are in public school. I'd love for my kids to be in private school but the only private schools in my area are very religious. Couple that with how may kids want to get in and how few place there are I didn't even try to get them in. I've started to regret that.
 
2013-02-11 01:01:09 PM

Endive Wombat: I see what you are saying, but I think this is where we differ - I do no view sports as education.  I view them as a extracurricular, sponsored and hosted by the school.  I was in cross county and track.  I was never given homework, tests, exams, finals, etc.  Sure, you may learn how to properly lift weights, stretch, run certain plays, etc with team sports, but there is little no actual educational value from playing a sport.  Am I making any sense or am I coming out of left field with my views?


Sports are good for teaching skills that you can't learn in a classroom that extend beyond how to exercise properly. Also there is the issue of Academic Eligibility. Kids with bad grades can't play sports in most high schools, this could be a way for schools to skirt the issue.
 
2013-02-11 01:04:50 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Egoy3k: I'm very socially inept and isolated as an adult and I can't imagine it would be any better for me if I had been further isolated.

So public school didn't make you a social butterfly? But I thought that was one of the many things that public school was suppose to do! We all know public school isn't there to offer a superior education in the fundamentals of learning. That's what private schools are there for.


Yeah but the friends I do have I met in public school. I'm a loner because I'm an asshole who thinks he is smarter than everyone around him. Public school isn't the best place to discourage this behavior, in fact it reinforced the notion.  I can't comment on the quality of the education I received as I didn't receive an education. It was very rare that I was ever presented with material that I hadn't encountered on my own or concepts that I didn't understand. That didn't change until the second year of my engineering degree.

What did benefit me is sports. I learned more on the field/ice/mountain than I did in the classroom.
 
2013-02-11 01:07:52 PM

Endive Wombat: I see what you are saying, but I think this is where we differ - I do no view sports as education. I view them as a extracurricular, sponsored and hosted by the school. I was in cross county and track. I was never given homework, tests, exams, finals, etc. Sure, you may learn how to properly lift weights, stretch, run certain plays, etc with team sports, but there is little no actual educational value from playing a sport. Am I making any sense or am I coming out of left field with my views?


But those sports are completely bound to the school.  They aren't just sponsored by the school, they are for better or worse a core component of the school.  You cannot separate them and just take what you want.
 
2013-02-11 01:10:37 PM

antidisestablishmentarianism: Sports are good for teaching skills that you can't learn in a classroom that extend beyond how to exercise properly. Also there is the issue of Academic Eligibility. Kids with bad grades can't play sports in most high schools, this could be a way for schools to skirt the issue.


Yeah, it teaches teamwork,comradery and the like, I know.   But you are not going to become a brilliant rocketsurgeon because you participated in high school baseball.

For a couple of star athletes, perhaps...maybe it might happen...maybe?  I honestly cannot see this happening on a grand scale or even ameasurable scale that matters, plus the logistics and keeping so many people quite/"in on it" is just too difficult to contain.
 
2013-02-11 01:13:12 PM

Endive Wombat: Yeah, it teaches teamwork,comradery and the like, I know. But you are not going to become a brilliant rocketsurgeon because you participated in high school baseball.


yeah but you might not become a drug dealer, car thief, or general all around scumbag because you played sports in high school.
 
2013-02-11 01:13:39 PM
Got to get a foot in that "gimmie free shiat" door somehow.

They'll sue when little Jebediah gets injured in practice.
 
2013-02-11 01:15:42 PM

GAT_00: Endive Wombat: I see what you are saying, but I think this is where we differ - I do no view sports as education. I view them as a extracurricular, sponsored and hosted by the school. I was in cross county and track. I was never given homework, tests, exams, finals, etc. Sure, you may learn how to properly lift weights, stretch, run certain plays, etc with team sports, but there is little no actual educational value from playing a sport. Am I making any sense or am I coming out of left field with my views?

But those sports are completely bound to the school.  They aren't just sponsored by the school, they are for better or worse a core component of the school.  You cannot separate them and just take what you want.


I guess we are going to have to agree to disagree.  I see no problem with using the public school as an augment to home schooling for specific subjects and extracurriculars.  Chemistry is something that comes to mind - Not every parent is going to have the chemicals, knowledge and equipment for teaching a proper chemistry course.  So I can see an argument being made by which a kid can come in for a class once or twice a week, and be given a report card, homework, and exams from the teacher.

Can home schooled kids use a public schools library?
 
2013-02-11 01:18:44 PM
Better sollution:  Remove all inter-school/city athletics from the school system.
 
2013-02-11 01:19:17 PM

Endive Wombat: GAT_00: Endive Wombat: I see what you are saying, but I think this is where we differ - I do no view sports as education. I view them as a extracurricular, sponsored and hosted by the school. I was in cross county and track. I was never given homework, tests, exams, finals, etc. Sure, you may learn how to properly lift weights, stretch, run certain plays, etc with team sports, but there is little no actual educational value from playing a sport. Am I making any sense or am I coming out of left field with my views?

But those sports are completely bound to the school.  They aren't just sponsored by the school, they are for better or worse a core component of the school.  You cannot separate them and just take what you want.

I guess we are going to have to agree to disagree.  I see no problem with using the public school as an augment to home schooling for specific subjects and extracurriculars.  Chemistry is something that comes to mind - Not every parent is going to have the chemicals, knowledge and equipment for teaching a proper chemistry course.  So I can see an argument being made by which a kid can come in for a class once or twice a week, and be given a report card, homework, and exams from the teacher.

Can home schooled kids use a public schools library?


Unless something has changed since I was in school...they were really, really strict about letting  anyonewho wasn't a student have access to the campus.
 
2013-02-11 01:21:53 PM

exick: But I tend to agree with one of the legislators from Virginia. Public school isn't "a la carte". If you don't want to send your kids to public school, that's your prerogative, but don't come tell me that you don't want to allow your kids in the classrooms but you would really like them to play sports, go to prom, be on the yearbook staff, participate in math club, etc.


Well, I'm no fan of home schooling and its tendency to crank out undereducated fundies.  But accepting that home schooling is a thing, and assuming adequate funding exists for the programs, what's so wrong with an "a la carte" approach, particularly if it helps home-schooled kids become properly socialized?  Is it just that we don't want to encourage home schooling?
 
2013-02-11 01:22:50 PM
i think we have this in florida but you have to do it at your zoned school. we have a lot of 'choice' programs where kids can go to schools out of their home zone for special academic programs.

my son is going to be in a dual enrollment program where in grades 10 thru 12 you are a full time college student. the school does have some varsity sports (swimming, volleyball (g), basketball (b and g), track, cross country, and maybe some others). my son is a decent football player (two way starter in his rec league all star team) and our local hs really wanted him to come to our zoned school to be on the team. we asked the dual enrollment school if he could do football. they said he could but only for his zoned school. he can do it for sports that his choice school doesn't offer. he doesn't want to play football (and we didn't want him to anymore either) but for lacrosse (where he is a pretty good goalie...for south florida) there is a problem. his zoned school dropped boys lacrosse. it is the only public school in our area that doesn't have it. he'll have to settle for the u15 rec and then try out for travel teams...if we can afford those.
 
2013-02-11 01:23:32 PM
Did the "Have One's Cake, and Eat It Too" bill pass as well, then?
 
2013-02-11 01:25:59 PM
USC is a private school
 
2013-02-11 01:29:14 PM

Tanukis_Parachute: i think we have this in florida but you have to do it at your zoned school. we have a lot of 'choice' programs where kids can go to schools out of their home zone for special academic programs.

my son is going to be in a dual enrollment program where in grades 10 thru 12 you are a full time college student. the school does have some varsity sports (swimming, volleyball (g), basketball (b and g), track, cross country, and maybe some others). my son is a decent football player (two way starter in his rec league all star team) and our local hs really wanted him to come to our zoned school to be on the team. we asked the dual enrollment school if he could do football. they said he could but only for his zoned school. he can do it for sports that his choice school doesn't offer. he doesn't want to play football (and we didn't want him to anymore either) but for lacrosse (where he is a pretty good goalie...for south florida) there is a problem. his zoned school dropped boys lacrosse. it is the only public school in our area that doesn't have it. he'll have to settle for the u15 rec and then try out for travel teams...if we can afford those.


A family friend in SoCal did some hybrid schooling.  Some homeschool stuff, some stuff at the local public school.  And 10-12 grades took college courses at the local community college.  By the time the oldest graduated high school (the other two are still in high school and following the same pattern), he had all of his basic GED stuff done for college and as an 18 year old high school grad, he entered college as a Jr.   The parents are saving a ton of money doing it this way.  My wife and I have discussed this with the parents in great detail and when we have kids, we will likely follow this path.
 
2013-02-11 01:38:01 PM

Endive Wombat: GAT_00: Endive Wombat: I see what you are saying, but I think this is where we differ - I do no view sports as education. I view them as a extracurricular, sponsored and hosted by the school. I was in cross county and track. I was never given homework, tests, exams, finals, etc. Sure, you may learn how to properly lift weights, stretch, run certain plays, etc with team sports, but there is little no actual educational value from playing a sport. Am I making any sense or am I coming out of left field with my views?

But those sports are completely bound to the school.  They aren't just sponsored by the school, they are for better or worse a core component of the school.  You cannot separate them and just take what you want.

I guess we are going to have to agree to disagree.  I see no problem with using the public school as an augment to home schooling for specific subjects and extracurriculars.  Chemistry is something that comes to mind - Not every parent is going to have the chemicals, knowledge and equipment for teaching a proper chemistry course.  So I can see an argument being made by which a kid can come in for a class once or twice a week, and be given a report card, homework, and exams from the teacher.

Can home schooled kids use a public schools library?


And if the parents want their kids to have a better education, they go to public school.  Homeschooled education is a supplement to organized education, not the other way around.
 
2013-02-11 01:38:35 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Both my boy play hockey and the league has nothing to do with school. But it's hockey in Oklahoma there isn't enough demand for it to be in the public schools.

Well, they have varsity level now.


I was gonna post something similar. Many of the counties in Maryland and Northern VA have hockey teams that are not related to the schools. The schools (public and private) have their own teams in different leagues. It's common to see kids playing for both the county team and their school team, but you don't need to be in school to play for a county team.

There's a wide variation in the talent level among the high school teams. The county teams are relatively even.
 
2013-02-11 01:38:55 PM

GAT_00: Endive Wombat: I see what you are saying, but I think this is where we differ - I do no view sports as education. I view them as a extracurricular, sponsored and hosted by the school. I was in cross county and track. I was never given homework, tests, exams, finals, etc. Sure, you may learn how to properly lift weights, stretch, run certain plays, etc with team sports, but there is little no actual educational value from playing a sport. Am I making any sense or am I coming out of left field with my views?

But those sports are completely bound to the school.  They aren't just sponsored by the school, they are for better or worse a core component of the school.  You cannot separate them and just take what you want.


You sound like someone just hating something because its different. What if a child isn't receiving the proper attention in a class with 30 others, so their parents make a good decision to do what's best for their child. Does that mean the child isn't good enough for your holy sports teams?

Your view is blind, arrogant, and disgusting. I'd be willing to bet that there are homeschooled kids around the country that are much better athletes than a lot public school teams and their talent deserves a stage too. Especially since their parents help pay for it.
 
2013-02-11 01:40:37 PM

GAT_00: And if the parents want their kids to have a better education, they go to public school.


Heh.. yeah sure.
 
2013-02-11 01:40:49 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: kid_icarus: I dunno...I don't really have a personal problem with it, per se. It's just I always thought if you were going to represent a school as a student athlete it was generally assumed you had to be enrolled as a student at that school. That's kinda the whole point. If you think public schools are inadequate for your snowflake that's fine , but I think by not enrolling them you're resigning access to all the school's services and benefits. Including sports.

Great point. If they would let you out of paying property taxes. But I've never heard of a city government letting anyone out of paying for a school just because their child doesn't attend that school. I know it's cliche but they're paying for it so they should have access to it.


I don't have kids, and I pay taxes.  Should I be allowed to access the school's facilities?
 
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