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(Short List)   Three-year-old joins Mensa after her IQ scores higher than Stephen Hawking. Meanwhile Subby, 32, is so dum he's probably managed a typo somewhere in this submmision   (shortlist.com) divider line 150
    More: Cool, Mensa, Prof Stephen Hawking  
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4883 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Feb 2013 at 10:04 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-11 08:10:25 AM
Meanwhile in the U.S....

blog.zap2it.com
 
2013-02-11 08:13:35 AM
it's sumbission dammit.  Learn how to spell subby.
 
2013-02-11 08:27:52 AM
If her parents were smart and wanted to filthy rich, they'd slap the kid's name and face on some "Baby Einstein" type of crap and sit back and watch every soccer mom in the US drain their bank accounts buying all of it.
 
2013-02-11 08:28:49 AM
I find that the identified "prodigies" tend to either go on to great works or utterly burn out before they leave their teens and go and do something else instead - or they go insane and/or commit suicide. Mostly the latter two, very rarely the former.

Then again, Mensa is filled with a bunch of self-proclaimed geniuses who sit around doing nothing for the benefit of the world except for Sodoku and Crossword puzzles, so I don't take much stock in them.
 
2013-02-11 08:29:18 AM

PacManDreaming: If her parents were smart and wanted to be filthy rich


Looks like I need some "Baby Einstein" crap to watch.
 
2013-02-11 08:41:23 AM
Despite the fact that we live in a society that generally tends to place great value on having a high intellect, I can't help but think of a three year old with such a high IQ as being a freak show. Assuming the child is capable of performing on an intellectual level of an adult, of course.
 
2013-02-11 08:47:15 AM
People make the mistake of thinking that IQ is some sort of permanent and unchanging characteristic about you. It's more like your belt size - it can fluctuate over time.
 
2013-02-11 09:01:50 AM
My first instinct here is to question the validity of the test.
Well, that's my first instinct for any IQ tests really.
"Complete this sequence: 1,2,3,5,7,9, __, __"
I know enough about math to know that any number can come next.  Seeing patterns where they don't necessarily exist does not make you smart.
 
2013-02-11 09:03:57 AM
Remember, if you want to boast about the enormous size of your IQ in one of these threads, there are certain standards and procedures that you need to follow lest people think you're some sort of insufferable braggart. First of all, you need to begin your IQ statement with some sort of declaimer explaining that you don't really care about your IQ. Something like, "I'm not really sure that it means all that much," or "I've never really placed much stock in this, but," or something like that. You could also go a slightly different path, acknowledging that your IQ is perhaps not quite as high as that of others, but that you were hung over/sick/distracted/bored when you took the test and so almost certainly didn't score as high as you otherwise might. Be careful to not overplay this hand, especially if others have already used something similar.

When you get to the actual number, it's generally best to express it as a range. Like, saying "I scored a 147" would possibly be impressive, except that, like in the Price is Right when some asshat comes in on the initial bid and goes one dollar over your offer and wins as a result, it's too easy to top. So, keeping it somewhat vague (I scored in the 140s-150s range, but the administrator said there were some irregularities that might have meant I actually scored much higher, etc.) works to your advantage. It's also a good idea to hang back in the thread a bit, wait to see if there some general field of scores being posted, and remain within striking distance of that so that you don't sound too out there. For example, if everyone is placing themselves in the 150-160 range, you might come in the upper 160s. Don't blow the field by more than a few points, though; you're likely to find yourself a target.

Self-hobbling is another great technique to make yourself seem more realistic when it comes to your high IQ score. By this, I mean claiming some sort of amusing defect that you must live with on a daily basis despite being "gifted" with such an enormous intellect. For example, you might be someone with a 180 IQ who can't, for the life of him, change his car oil. And you might sentimentalize a bit about it, must on how sometimes you think it would be a good thing to be just slightly less perceptive, slightly less intelligent, if only you could get your hands around some of the "common sense," "nitty gritty" know how that the less intellectually endowed sometimes seem to have. It doesn't have to be mechanical skills, of course. Maybe you're forgetful, always misplacing your keys. Maybe you're just  terrible with names. Be creative, that's what you do.
 
2013-02-11 09:45:21 AM

Pocket Ninja: Remember, if you want to boast about the enormous size of your IQ in one of these threads

...


Heh heh!  This.


/How do you know someone is in Mensa?
//They'll tell you!
 
2013-02-11 10:08:22 AM
Apparently she's so smart that she cuts her own hair.
 
2013-02-11 10:10:23 AM
What does it say about Mensa, or having a high IQ in general, if a three year old can do it? Does it really mean being good at solving puzzles while having no actual knowledge of the world?
 
2013-02-11 10:11:10 AM
IQ tests test specific knowledge and abstract reasoning, not intellect.

I am programmer with a high IQ. My mechanic step-father has a low one.  Who do you want working on your car?

Here's a harder one: do you want uneducated but experienced construction workers building your house, or the architects and structural engineers that designed it?
 
2013-02-11 10:13:56 AM
What test did she take, I wonder? Different tests will yield different results, which even Mensa acknowledges: the IQ threshold is different depending on what test you take.
 
2013-02-11 10:17:27 AM

Hoboclown: What does it say about Mensa, or having a high IQ in general, if a three year old can do it? Does it really mean being good at solving puzzles while having no actual knowledge of the world?


IQ is supposed to be a proportion. I'd call the reliability of any test given to a three-year-old into question, but three-year-olds can be highly intelligent. They obviously don't know as much as an adult would -though you'd be surprised: the amount we learn in the first few years of life is staggering- but intelligence isn't about having a big store of facts in your brain. It helps in building such a store, but it's not the same thing as that store.
 
2013-02-11 10:17:47 AM
IQ means intelligence quotient.  It is defined as the quotient of your mental age divided by your physical age.

So if you multiply your physical age by your IQ, you get your mental age.

This girl is the mental equivalent of somewhere between four and seven years old (if it's like, the day before her fourth birthday).

/Last I checked, my IQ was 140.
//On one part of the test (I think the verbal IQ), I scored "off the charts", which caps out at 160.
///Was a LONG time ago.
 
2013-02-11 10:19:07 AM

Hoboclown: What does it say about Mensa, or having a high IQ in general, if a three year old can do it? Does it really mean being good at solving puzzles while having no actual knowledge of the world?


The idea behind the IQ score is that it's age adjusted for development. If a 3 year old has an IQ of 150 (for simplified math), that means that she has the reasoning skills of somebody 150% her age, or similar to a 4.5 year old. A 10 year old with an IQ of 150 would have the mental skills of a 15 year old. Once you hit a certain age, that stops meaning anything rational.

Let's say you're 25. If you performed the same on the IQ test as the 3 year old did, you would have an IQ of about 20. So, no, "A three year old can do it" is really not the line you want to take here.

Others have already pointed out most of the flaws in the concept of an IQ test to begin with, so I won't reiterate them.
 
2013-02-11 10:19:38 AM

nmemkha: IQ tests test specific knowledge and abstract reasoning, not intellect.

I am programmer with a high IQ. My mechanic step-father has a low one.  Who do you want working on your car?

Here's a harder one: do you want uneducated but experienced construction workers building your house, or the architects and structural engineers that designed it?


Honestly? The structural engineer, maybe with the help of a construction worker. Sure it will take more time, but he's not going to take the shortcuts that the construction worker took.

//Could I afford to have this happen? No.
 
2013-02-11 10:19:59 AM
The only thing more useless than an IQ test for an adult is an IQ test for a three-year-old.
 
2013-02-11 10:24:08 AM
Is Mensa a life time thing or do you have to keep proving your IQ? I can imagine some people peaking at a young age and then having trouble with the word jumble in the Sunday paper later in life.
 
2013-02-11 10:24:57 AM
I enjoyed your headline subby. +1, would grammar nazi again.
 
2013-02-11 10:26:03 AM

andrewagill: /Last I checked, my IQ was 140.
//On one part of the test (I think the verbal IQ), I scored "off the charts", which caps out at 160.
///Was a LONG time ago.


Oh, great, IQ braggers.
 
2013-02-11 10:27:25 AM

Solty Dog: Is Mensa a life time thing or do you have to keep proving your IQ? I can imagine some people peaking at a young age and then having trouble with the word jumble in the Sunday paper later in life.


Once you prove your intelligence, I believe that they let you pay them money for the rest of your life -- which, I believe, then proves your un-intellegence.
 
2013-02-11 10:27:32 AM
Well at 3 years old I see she has learned to wear whore lipstick.
 
2013-02-11 10:27:41 AM

Solty Dog: Is Mensa a life time thing or do you have to keep proving your IQ? I can imagine some people peaking at a young age and then having trouble with the word jumble in the Sunday paper later in life.


As long as you pay your dues, you're in. Just like AARP.
 
2013-02-11 10:28:34 AM
When I was 2 I spoke french, german, russian and chineese equally well. I also taught my younger sister things (like pain). I didn't get some fancy piece of paper.
 
2013-02-11 10:29:27 AM
In before...

RexTalionis: Then again, Mensa is filled with a bunch of self-proclaimed geniuses who sit around doing nothing for the benefit of the world except for Sodoku and Crossword puzzles, so I don't take much stock in them.


Dammit.
 
2013-02-11 10:30:34 AM
In fact, the purported IQ score of a child means absolutely nothing. Some psychologist will hopefully chime in here and explain in detail, but it seems to me that they give the test, look at the resulting raw score, then compare it to the bell curve for kids their age and use that to extrapolate to what it would be if they were at the same point on the adult bell curve. Which obviously entails a huge assumption.

Basically, if your kid is a precocious reader and you've been taking an active role in providing them a traditional (maths/language/reasoning) education, they can score any sort of stupid meaningless number all the way up to 250 or something. My dad was a typical WWII vet/1950s household father, who taught me math and bought me "a children's guide to..." books - heck, he gave me a dictionary when I was 6 - so I ended up in grade 3 being selected for the "gifted program" based on some sort of IQ-like test, along with a whole pile of other kids who were essentially same as everyone else but with more traditional, education-positive parents.

I took a Mensa IQ test a couple years ago, by the way, and was amazed at how many of the answers I was able to solve just because I've been using AutoCAD for ten years. Being able to mentally rotate solids in 2 or 3 dimensions, do math, and infer extrapolations is just a part of my daily tasks at work.

I wish there was an "ex-Mensa" club I could join. Seems all the cool people do Mensa for a year, then quit cos it's ghey.
 
2013-02-11 10:30:47 AM
Somebody is going to be a social pariah. She'll probably still be a virgin when she graduates from preschool.
 
2013-02-11 10:32:12 AM

RexTalionis: andrewagill: /Last I checked, my IQ was 140.
//On one part of the test (I think the verbal IQ), I scored "off the charts", which caps out at 160.
///Was a LONG time ago.

Oh, great, IQ braggers.


Yeah, but what's his Fark account number?
 
2013-02-11 10:37:46 AM

RexTalionis: Oh, great, IQ braggers.


As if this thread had any chance of avoiding it.
 
2013-02-11 10:38:34 AM
I bet she still shiats her pants now and then, but at least she can tell her parents in Russian.
 
2013-02-11 10:38:55 AM
I subscribe to Buffalo theory.
 
2013-02-11 10:40:19 AM
Ever hang out with Mensans?  Didja want to kill them after two minutes?


/ stop with the farkin' puns!
 
2013-02-11 10:42:13 AM

Hoboclown: What does it say about Mensa, or having a high IQ in general, if a three year old can do it? Does it really mean being good at solving puzzles while having no actual knowledge of the world?


A 3 year old doesn't get the IQ test an adult or a teen would. It would probably be more like the prison scene in Idiocracy than "Find the next number in this sequence: 1/9, 1/6, 1/4, ...".

An IQ test on a three year old doesn't even say very much. IQ at young ages correlates pretty weakly with IQ at age 18, which would mean that she might still remain above average but she might also take a dive and wind up with a score of 90 (unlikely, but it could theoretically happen).

nmemkha: IQ tests test specific knowledge and abstract reasoning, not intellect.

I am programmer with a high IQ. My mechanic step-father has a low one.  Who do you want working on your car?

Here's a harder one: do you want uneducated but experienced construction workers building your house, or the architects and structural engineers that designed it?


A decent IQ test would be restricted to knowledge everyone should be expected to have. So there wouldn't be a world geography question but fractions (which everyone learns at some point or another) could appear, just like mental rotation, image sequences etc. It is also quite a cop-out to point to people with specific skill sets as "intelligent" as those are what they learned in life. Just because someone with a low IQ is a mechanic and someone with a high IQ sucks at being a mechanic doesn't mean the mechanic is intelligent or smart. Just that they possess the required skills for being a mechanic. It is also why you'll never see an IQ test asking people to wire a house or to rebuild an internal combustion engine.
 
2013-02-11 10:42:28 AM

iron_city_ap: I subscribe to Buffalo theory.


That the Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo?
 
2013-02-11 10:44:45 AM

Cythraul: Despite the fact that we live in a society that generally tends to place great value on having a high intellect, I can't help but think of a three year old with such a high IQ as being a freak show. Assuming the child is capable of performing on an intellectual level of an adult, of course.


You lost me there.
 
2013-02-11 10:44:58 AM
As an 18 month old super-genius, I'm getting a kick out of some of these replies...
 
2013-02-11 10:46:15 AM
She's probably great at linear thinking. Give her an abstract problem that requires imagination and it all goes downhill quickly. IQ isn't practical knowledge. Look at fark. Some great minds here, but somefarkers are so closed off from new ideas they refuse to deviate outside of anything they've been taught in school.
 
2013-02-11 10:47:28 AM

RexTalionis: I find that the identified "prodigies" tend to either go on to great works or utterly burn out before they leave their teens and go and do something else instead - or they go insane and/or commit suicide. Mostly the latter two, very rarely the former.


This is true. My little nephew showed great promise as a future Bond villain when he was three, but by the time he was five all he was interested in was feeling the babysitter out.
 
2013-02-11 10:52:17 AM
When I was a teenager I made the Who's Who of American High School Students. I think...I mean I didn't buy a copy so I have no idea if they really put me in there.
 
2013-02-11 10:53:08 AM
So just like a penis thread, this is where everyone lies about how big their IQ is?

/no one cares what your IQ is
//no one believes you either
 
2013-02-11 10:53:28 AM
Too Old.
 
2013-02-11 10:53:42 AM
Crazy that we still have to test for this. Is modern neuroscience still so completely in the dark that even with high-resolution MRI technology they can't tell us simple things like "is this person smart"?
 
2013-02-11 10:54:20 AM

andrewagill: IQ means intelligence quotient.  It is defined as the quotient of your mental age divided by your physical age.

So if you multiply your physical age by your IQ, you get your mental age.

This girl is the mental equivalent of somewhere between four and seven years old (if it's like, the day before her fourth birthday).

/Last I checked, my IQ was 140.
//On one part of the test (I think the verbal IQ), I scored "off the charts", which caps out at 160.
///Was a LONG time ago.


So that means people who are 0 years old have an infinite IQ!
 
2013-02-11 10:55:18 AM

mccallcl: Crazy that we still have to test for this. Is modern neuroscience still so completely in the dark that even with high-resolution MRI technology they can't tell us simple things like "is this person smart"?


According to my tricorder, no, you aren't.
 
2013-02-11 10:55:38 AM

syrynxx: Meanwhile in the U.S....


That just lowered everyone's IQ by 30 points.
 
2013-02-11 10:56:45 AM

MindStalker: nmemkha: IQ tests test specific knowledge and abstract reasoning, not intellect.

I am programmer with a high IQ. My mechanic step-father has a low one.  Who do you want working on your car?

Here's a harder one: do you want uneducated but experienced construction workers building your house, or the architects and structural engineers that designed it?

Honestly? The structural engineer, maybe with the help of a construction worker. Sure it will take more time, but he's not going to take the shortcuts that the construction worker took.

//Could I afford to have this happen? No.


Apparently you don't know how construction works. The experienced construction worker will make it safer and better than the structural engineer would. The word "experienced" is the power word in this context.
 
2013-02-11 10:56:51 AM

RexTalionis: Then again, Mensa is filled with a bunch of self-proclaimed geniuses who sit around doing nothing for the benefit of the world except for Sodoku and Crossword puzzles, so I don't take much stock in them.


Said the fox.

So if you multiply your physical age by your IQ, you get your mental age.

This definition is over 100 years out of date.
 
2013-02-11 10:57:51 AM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
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