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(Today)   Aging bikers are three times more likely to get injured, ride through this world all alone   (todayhealth.today.com) divider line 82
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3725 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Feb 2013 at 8:48 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-10 02:35:46 AM
It's the largest growing demographic.The insurance companies' MBA's crosshairs are on hiking their rates - just give 'em a reason.

REVENUE, BABY!!!!!

"My only regret is that I have... Boneitis."

s7.postimage.org
 
2013-02-10 07:30:57 AM
One of the guys I work with is retiring soon and he's cashing in a chunk of his retirement on a massive full-dresser Harley he plans to ride cross-country with his wife.

He's never owned a bike in his life and scoffed at me when I suggested he take the free MSP training classes offered by the state. Even after I told him that I, a younger, stronger, fitter man riding a smaller, lighter bike, took the class and found it useful -- if for nothing else than the insurance rate break.

I'm hoping he at least makes it out of the area code before he dumps it, but I'm guessing it will be more like the zip code.
 
2013-02-10 08:47:37 AM
I see more and more people around here driving the three wheel models. I imagine you have to put a little more effort into up ending that.
 
2013-02-10 09:00:17 AM
images01.olx.com
It's a snowmobile on wheels - which, like a snowmobile, is easy to ride when drunk old.
 
2013-02-10 09:00:20 AM
The crow flies straight
 
2013-02-10 09:00:32 AM

Solty Dog: I see more and more people around here driving the three wheel models. I imagine you have to put a little more effort into up ending that.



Those are awesome. Most of the danger of riding a bike, no skill required, and all the inconvenience of a small car.
 
2013-02-10 09:01:44 AM
they're also more likely to be riding 900+ pound goldwings and harleys that don't handle nearly as well as a lighter bike, and are harder to pick up once dropped.
 
2013-02-10 09:04:31 AM
Pretty much makes sense. All other things being equal in a crash, the older brittle body will sustain more injury.
 
2013-02-10 09:08:53 AM
So... all of them?
 
2013-02-10 09:11:09 AM
Wow...older people have slower reflexes? Crazy!

/now THIS is pod racing
 
2013-02-10 09:15:52 AM
They also (maybe) ride larger-displacement bikes.

Original paper here. (paywalled, of course)
 
2013-02-10 09:17:48 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: I suggested he take the free MSP training classes


I've been riding since I was 5.  First was an Enduro 80 and I had to take off on the kickstand and stop by jumping off and running along side because my feet couldn't touch the ground.  Had other Enduros, YZ's, etc...  Lots of stitches in the early days.  Had several roadbikes to include a Nighthawk, XS1100, and my favorite which is a Valkyrie.  Fast forward about 40 years and I've logged hundreds and hundreds of thousands of miles on bikes.  Rain/shine/snow.  I probably have about 150,000 miles on 4 wheeled vehicles.

I took the MSP a few years ago (insurance discount) and learned much more than I expected.  The guy is a damn fool and will have a short retirement.
 
2013-02-10 09:19:18 AM
Jemma can give you some of those shots if you're having a problem with that, on the Devil's Bed until you die.
 
2013-02-10 09:27:16 AM
But aging is wonderful and makes you better, stronger and wiser, and you never, ever want to be young again?
 
2013-02-10 09:29:28 AM
bike thread?
bike thread.

my first one... been riding ~2 years
www.projecttrackrat.com
 
2013-02-10 09:30:43 AM
As people get older they start to realize that this life is short, that's a fact. They figure they better live it right because they ain't coming back.

Me, I'm the mullet-mobile type and unashamed. The only reason I don't own something retarded like an IROC is because I don't want to put gas in a third car I don't need.
 
2013-02-10 09:39:45 AM
The problem, as I see it, is the biker low-five wave. The wave has become ubiquitous, while bikes and bikers are now everywhere. Thus you have an endless stream of motorists on an already unsteady vehicle platform driving around with one hand on the handlebars.
 
2013-02-10 09:40:25 AM
Please become a Maggie Siff thread.
 
2013-02-10 09:42:15 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: ... I suggested he take the free MSP training classes I'm hoping he at least makes it out of the area code before he dumps it, but I'm guessing it will be more like the zip code.



I did the same thing last year when a colleague's wife bought him a V-Rod for father's day. Thankfully, he did enroll in the class the next week. I asked if she had increased his life insurance recently and was trying to collect.

Mr. Coffee Nerves: ... I'm hoping he at least makes it out of the area code before he dumps it, but I'm guessing it will be more like the zip code.



Maybe the parking lot.

I got back into riding last year and bought a new Honda Shadow Phantom. After I signed the papers, the shop was installing an after market exhaust, so the salesman and I were talking about riding. He said a lot of first time buyers who get the big bikes crash them into the telephone pole on the way out of the parking lot. I asked if they had thought about mounting parts to the pole like the tree of shame in Deals Gap / The Dragon.

oneping.net
 
2013-02-10 10:11:23 AM
<img src="i812.photobucket.com ">
Old guys should ride old bikes. If you can't kick start it you ain't going anywhere.
 
2013-02-10 10:31:02 AM
How much of this is down to the older demographic having little to no protective gear? The same off while wearing just jeans, t-shirt and pisspot will be much more nasty than armoured leathers/textiles and a full face?

/most of the squid types in Britain are Rossi wannabes so have the full power ranger outfits.
 
2013-02-10 10:33:15 AM

Norfolking Chance: How much of this is down to the older demographic having little to no protective gear? The same off while wearing just jeans, t-shirt and pisspot will be much more nasty than armoured leathers/textiles and a full face?

/most of the squid types in Britain are Rossi wannabes so have the full power ranger outfits.


Well, hard to say. The data is from emergency room admittances, so they are sort of sampling on the dependent variable (crashes bad enough to visit the ER), without a great deal of work done to try and match that to the riding demographic, etc.

About all that can be done with that data, of course, but not entirely satisfying, either. I'm surprised at the media attention.
 
2013-02-10 10:35:56 AM
Of course older people are going to get hurt more easily.  That's just physiology.

Bike thread?
My last baby, before I made her over for the track:

s11.postimage.org

Once in a while, you have to act a fool:

s3.postimage.org

"I got somethin' to say... It's better to burn out, that to fade away!"

s18.postimage.org
 
2013-02-10 10:53:06 AM
unfortunately, the MSF training is pretty light.

if you are serious about riding and pushing your skills level take Lee Parks Total control class.

best money ever sptent
 
2013-02-10 10:53:11 AM
Just picked this up last Saturday. I'm planning getting some track training, which won't be cheap, but should be worth it.

i47.tinypic.com
 
2013-02-10 10:56:59 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: One of the guys I work with is retiring soon and he's cashing in a chunk of his retirement on a massive full-dresser Harley he plans to ride cross-country with his wife.

He's never owned a bike in his life and scoffed at me when I suggested he take the free MSP training classes offered by the state. Even after I told him that I, a younger, stronger, fitter man riding a smaller, lighter bike, took the class and found it useful -- if for nothing else than the insurance rate break.

I'm hoping he at least makes it out of the area code before he dumps it, but I'm guessing it will be more like the zip code.


The US Navy safety office has about nine billion anecdotes about guys who buy a bike, scoff at the safety course, and ride the bike EXACTLY like that scene in Zombieland.

If he won't take the course, can I send you a GoPro to give him so we get some sweet footage for later? You can tell him I said that.
 
2013-02-10 11:15:34 AM
Jim Lattimore, of Franklin, Tenn., has ridden over 800,000 miles on motorcycles in 74 countries over a span of nearly five decades. He still owns 14 bikes. But he's 69, now.
Wrote the twentysomething that has no clue.
WOW!  He's really FARKIN' old *sheesh*.    By the time you've hit 69 you pretty much know how to stay alive or at the very least, how to heal quickly.  The clowns getting hurt likely haven't ridden before.
 
2013-02-10 11:33:21 AM
As someone who started riding at 14, I would suggest that everyone avoid sport bikes as their first bike. They are too fast for a novice and you can get yourself into a fatal situation in the blink of an eye.

Get a mid sized cruiser or dual sport until turning and collision avoidance actions are reflex. Some bikes even come with ABS these days, which wont teach you proper respect for front braking, so learn on something cheap and older.

/.02
//too many idiots doing 140 in traffic
 
2013-02-10 11:59:14 AM

oldfarthenry: [images01.olx.com image 625x469]
It's a snowmobile on wheels - which, like a snowmobile, is easy to ride when drunk old.


You know, I've never understood the appeal of trikes. It's all the danger of a motorcycle with none of the fun handling you get from two wheels. If you're going to ride on three wheels, why not get a Jeep or a convertible? At least then you'll probably live when some asshole hits you.

Not trying to be a dick here; I really just don't understand the appeal.
 
2013-02-10 12:05:04 PM

Cast: Some bikes even come with ABS these days, which wont teach you proper respect for front braking, so learn on something cheap and older.


Ah, sage advice! I owned a BMW with ABS, and felt like a eunuch the whole time. It was otherwise a great machine, but I always took offense at the machine dictating my safety rather than me, the rider. When a friend asks me for advice about a first bike, ABS is definitely out of the picture. Skilled braking is a huge part of motorcycle safety and, dammit, you need to learn it even if you do end up with an ABS rig.
 
2013-02-10 12:06:41 PM
Most people here are missing the point of TFA. It doesn't state that older riders are three times more likely to be injured than younger riders. What it does say is that there are three times more older riders being injured than there were a few years ago, but that they still only constitute 10% of injured riders.

Intentionally misleading headline, you think ?

/A rider for the last 34 years
//Yes, I own a Harley dresser...
///...and a dual-sport Suzuki...
////...and a few derelicts in need of restoration
 
2013-02-10 12:07:43 PM

Arn_Dee: Please become a Maggie Siff thread.


Yes.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-02-10 12:15:39 PM

Repo Man: Just picked this up last Saturday. I'm planning getting some track training, which won't be cheap, but should be worth it.

[i47.tinypic.com image 640x480]


The fact that you actively sought training means you're not an idiot. We've all seen idiots with a spare 10 grand roll out the door on a crotch cannon and die exactly 3 minutes later.

 I ride a similar style bike (naked, tho, which is what I prefer when I lowside it on wet leaves in the driveway at 5 farking MPH). You're about to have a great time, bro.

Also: track training and subsequent track days will teach you what is necessary, and what is stupid. Those skilz apply to our public roads, too. Just not at 165mph.
 
2013-02-10 12:20:16 PM

dickfreckle: oldfarthenry: [images01.olx.com image 625x469]
It's a snowmobile on wheels - which, like a snowmobile, is easy to ride when drunk old.

You know, I've never understood the appeal of trikes. It's all the danger of a motorcycle with none of the fun handling you get from two wheels. If you're going to ride on three wheels, why not get a Jeep or a convertible? At least then you'll probably live when some asshole hits you.

Not trying to be a dick here; I really just don't understand the appeal.


A couple years ago, my daughter, her boyfriend, and I attended a Canam Spyder demo ride. We're all experienced riders.  My daughter hated them, her boyfriend was more meh..., but I found them surprisingly fun when taken for what they are.

You are correct in assuming that they do not handle like a two-wheeler (of course, they don't ! how could they ?), however that does not mean they are not fun in their own way.  The steering, for example, is wickedly direct and, coupled with the fact that you can actually see them, allows you to place the front wheels within millimetres of the apex when cornering.  And don't forget that the G-forces are tugging your body to the outside of the corner, forcing you to lean to the inside if you want to corner with any gusto. As I said, taken for what they are, they can be a lot of fun, just don't compare them to what they are not. And what they are not is motorcycles. Or cars.
 
2013-02-10 12:23:15 PM

dickfreckle: Repo Man: Just picked this up last Saturday. I'm planning getting some track training, which won't be cheap, but should be worth it.

[i47.tinypic.com image 640x480]

The fact that you actively sought training means you're not an idiot. We've all seen idiots with a spare 10 grand roll out the door on a crotch cannon and die exactly 3 minutes later.

 I ride a similar style bike (naked, tho, which is what I prefer when I lowside it on wet leaves in the driveway at 5 farking MPH). You're about to have a great time, bro.

Also: track training and subsequent track days will teach you what is necessary, and what is stupid. Those skilz apply to our public roads, too. Just not at 165mph.




I know how to ride - I got my motorcycle license in 1983 (I didn't get my license for a car until 1986). I rode the hell out of my brother's hand me down CB400F. A few years later, I bought a GS550ES, and retired that when it had 30,000 miles on it. I took a break, and bought a 1200 Bandit in 2005. I've never ridden that motorcycle too much though, it wasn't what I really wanted, but it was what I could afford. This bike was what I wanted. And I want to get some training because I'd like to know how to really ride it. I also like the idea of having fun where I don't have to worry about getting a speeding ticket.
 
2013-02-10 12:26:31 PM

capt.hollister: Most people here are missing the point of TFA. It doesn't state that older riders are three times more likely to be injured than younger riders. What it does say is that there are three times more older riders being injured than there were a few years ago, but that they still only constitute 10% of injured riders.

Intentionally misleading headline, you think ?

/A rider for the last 34 years
//Yes, I own a Harley dresser...
///...and a dual-sport Suzuki...
////...and a few derelicts in need of restoration


Please know that I'm trying to insult you, personally, with the following comment:

Older riders are obsessed with HD. Some are very qualified riders, but many are "lifestyle" types. Looking the part and keeping the chrome so clean you could eat off of it is more important to them than actually knowing how to ride the thing.

These are the people you read about in the morning news, following their long night at the local Hooter's, dressed to fit some stupid image in their minds. These are the people who contribute to stats - every bit as retarded as the 19 year-old who just walked out the door with a liter superbike and has no idea how to ride.

I rebuilt a Superglide with my dad, and rode it around for a while. The thing I noticed most about HD culture is that it's less about motorcycling itself and more about the thimble some of them call a penis. But again, this can be applied to dorks on sportbikes as well. I guess what I'm saying is that all of motorcycledom has a share of stupidity. But any conversation about older riders being increasingly in crashes can likely be laid on the allure of HD.
 
2013-02-10 12:30:34 PM

capt.hollister: As I said, taken for what they are, they can be a lot of fun, just don't compare them to what they are not. And what they are not is motorcycles.


That's the largest part of my dislike of them - all the danger, but less of the appeal. Most of us ride motorcycles because we either don't fear danger, or want to confront it. But we are definitely all in serious danger every time we fire the ignition (or kick it, if you're cooler than I am).

Asking me to not compare the same danger, but with less reward, doesn't make sense to me.
 
2013-02-10 12:36:02 PM
Certainly killed my 78 y.o. friend Ed. Pickup turned directly into him head on

(pic is not of the incident, but almost identical)

smnewsnet.com
 
2013-02-10 12:36:59 PM

dickfreckle: Please know that I'm NOT NOT NOT trying to insult you, personally, with the following comment:


FTFM. Sorry.
 
2013-02-10 12:41:30 PM
Europe as a whole seems to take motorcycling pretty seriously - mention ignoring instruction or reluctance to increase your skillset and you'll be laughed out the room. Secondly, protective gear is seen as just that over there - a necessity.

I was fortunate to take the MSF three-day course at Hanscom AFB in the early 00s. Previously I'd ridden the hell out of numerous dirtbikes on trails while growing up. Even though the MSF can be said to just scratch the surface, I learned an awful lot, including several techniques that helped make me a safer rider.

Ignorance is bliss until you end up in a situation where honing a series of skills would have helped. Willfully being ignorant makes you everyone's problem due to your lack of ability. People getting on large-displacement bikes without knowing how to brake, not knowing how to counter-steer or enter a corner are accidents waiting to happen.
 
2013-02-10 12:42:13 PM
A lot of these older guys are re-entry riders who are getting a motorcycle again after a layoff of 10 or 20 years or more.  A lot of people give up riding when they have kids, figuring they don't want to leave their families without a breadwinner and/or with only one parent.  (Usually the dad, let's not kid ourselves, the motorcycling demographic is IIRC around 90% male.)

Once the kids are grown and college costs are accounted for, they'll take 10 or 20 large and buy the biggest baddest thing they can find, like a full-dresser Harley.  Problem is, traffic has gotten much worse since they learned to ride back in the 70s, bikes have gotten bigger and heavier, the riding reflexes are gone from muscle memory.  Worst-case, their sole riding experience consists of having taken their college roomie's Honda CM400 around the parking lot a couple of times back during the early Reagan administration and not having gotten above 20mph and second gear.  "Sure, I know how to ride."  Yeah, of course you do, buddy....

<harry_hurt>They still haven't learned to use the front brake, either. </harry_hurt>

Obligatory:   http://www.msf-usa.org/
 
2013-02-10 12:43:55 PM

Clemkadidlefark: Certainly killed my 78 y.o. friend Ed. Pickup turned directly into him head on


Damn, I'm sorry to hear that. Stories like your friend's are why most motorcyclists are especially paranoid about turning motorists. It's like we don't exist. I had a compound fracture from some phone-chatty c*nt (a word I don't use often, but is deserved in this case) in downtown Atlanta. I didn't even live there, making the crash even more annoying than it should have been.

Whenever I see a four-wheeler attempting to turn, I try to watch their tires. It's a quicker response than judging the body of the vehicle. Maybe that's not expert advice but it's always worked for me (after I was hit).
 
2013-02-10 12:56:21 PM
Yeah, I'm over 50 and been riding for 35yrs. It's rare that experienced older riders get hurt from our own actions: it's typically some asshole not paying attention turning left in front of us, or some punk "drifting" into our lane.

Get off my pavement
 
2013-02-10 01:04:43 PM
Nothing like the sight of a middle age woman wearing leather 4 sizes too small with her limping, cane using husband moving slowly down a sidewalk. Yep, bikers.
 
2013-02-10 01:11:37 PM

Znuh: Europe as a whole seems to take motorcycling pretty seriously - mention ignoring instruction or reluctance to increase your skillset and you'll be laughed out the room. Secondly, protective gear is seen as just that over there - a necessity.

I was fortunate to take the MSF three-day course at Hanscom AFB in the early 00s. Previously I'd ridden the hell out of numerous dirtbikes on trails while growing up. Even though the MSF can be said to just scratch the surface, I learned an awful lot, including several techniques that helped make me a safer rider.

Ignorance is bliss until you end up in a situation where honing a series of skills would have helped. Willfully being ignorant makes you everyone's problem due to your lack of ability. People getting on large-displacement bikes without knowing how to brake, not knowing how to counter-steer or enter a corner are accidents waiting to happen.


Took the 3 day course a couple years ago after buying a used bike from someone I know, Only rode it a little ways down the country road where the bike had been stored. I didn't dump it, but I realized I needed to know wtf I was doing so I had someone that does ride take it to my place where it sat in my garage until I was able to get a class date and complete it a month later. While the class isn't required for a license unless you're under 18 in this state, it should be. I learned a hell of a lot from that class that I would have otherwise been ignorant to.
 
2013-02-10 01:15:25 PM

dickfreckle: Cast: Some bikes even come with ABS these days, which wont teach you proper respect for front braking, so learn on something cheap and older.

Ah, sage advice! I owned a BMW with ABS, and felt like a eunuch the whole time. It was otherwise a great machine, but I always took offense at the machine dictating my safety rather than me, the rider. When a friend asks me for advice about a first bike, ABS is definitely out of the picture. Skilled braking is a huge part of motorcycle safety and, dammit, you need to learn it even if you do end up with an ABS rig.


Can't say i agree with you on ABS on road bikes. Unless you are learning off road skills (like track or dirt) then you will get far more out of spending your time on observation and planning than learning how far you can push your front brake before it gives way. Current ABS units are just too good to not have it available in emergencies.

Exploring the limits of grip is a good thing (when done in a safe environment) but the general opinion on this side of the pond is to wait until you have a few years experience on the road before anything like that.
 
2013-02-10 01:20:23 PM
I got off my Harley back in the early 80's when my kids were little. Would I get back on a bike today ? HELL NO !!! In my area there are lots of "guest workers" and there families that don't have a driver's license or insurance. They drink, roll stop signs, speed, tailgate, crazy lane changes and when they crash they get out and run. Good friend of mine was riding his bike and saw the light turn yellow and he wanted to make a left hand turn, well he gunned it to make the light and the guy coming down the road gunned it to make the light and they met in the middle. My buddy center punched the frontend of a fullsize Chevy pick sailed over the cab and hit a telephone pole, killed instantly. Another buddy always wanted a Harley (Road King) a few weeks after he got it he was giving a friend's wife a ride came to a stop sign used the front brake but some dirt was on the ground he washed out the frontend stuck his leg out to stop the fall and snapped it in half. He now has the "Harley limp". For the guys who do ride now you have to worry about people talking on Cell phones, texting, GPS, blasting stereo's, young kids in fast cars, I think driving is #3 on the list when in the car.
 
2013-02-10 01:20:35 PM

dickfreckle: capt.hollister: Most people here are missing the point of TFA. It doesn't state that older riders are three times more likely to be injured than younger riders. What it does say is that there are three times more older riders being injured than there were a few years ago, but that they still only constitute 10% of injured riders.

Intentionally misleading headline, you think ?

/A rider for the last 34 years
//Yes, I own a Harley dresser...
///...and a dual-sport Suzuki...
////...and a few derelicts in need of restoration

Please know that I'm trying to insult you, personally, with the following comment:

Older riders are obsessed with HD. Some are very qualified riders, but many are "lifestyle" types. Looking the part and keeping the chrome so clean you could eat off of it is more important to them than actually knowing how to ride the thing.

These are the people you read about in the morning news, following their long night at the local Hooter's, dressed to fit some stupid image in their minds. These are the people who contribute to stats - every bit as retarded as the 19 year-old who just walked out the door with a liter superbike and has no idea how to ride.

I rebuilt a Superglide with my dad, and rode it around for a while. The thing I noticed most about HD culture is that it's less about motorcycling itself and more about the thimble some of them call a penis. But again, this can be applied to dorks on sportbikes as well. I guess what I'm saying is that all of motorcycledom has a share of stupidity. But any conversation about older riders being increasingly in crashes can likely be laid on the allure of HD.


I didn't feel insulted in any way, even before reading your FTFM.

The people you describe do exist. Some ride HDs, some ride GoldWings, and many ride large metric cruisers. Around here there are even some who get full-adventure giant trail bikes like BMW GSs from which they often can't reach the ground and which they have a hard time balancing when the tank is full. Perfect for fantasizing about that ride to Tierra de Fuego they'll never actually go on. But whatever they choose to ride, they do exist. Let's try not to be too hard on them, though, because like it or not, they are still part of our world.

My reasons for owning a HD are more prosaic. When I bought it, I owned a Triumph Thruxton (God, I loved that bike !) and an ageing Kawasaki Voyager XII. Advancing ostheo-arthritis in the clutch hand meant the Triumph would eventually have to go to a good home, and a mix of high-mileage and a stiff clutch meant the Kawi had to go now.

Anyhow, around the same time I read magazine road-tests that described the then-new (this was 2007) HDs as having a redesigned, lighter clutch. I'd never considered a HD before, but it seemed worth a try. I reserved a spot for when the HD demo-ride circus came to town. As it happens , on the same day as the HD I also test rode a Gold Wing. The GW was perfect in every possible way. So easy to ride, I was immediately doing feet-up full-lock u-turns on it. Mrs capt. loved it. Personally, though, I disliked it immensely. It had all the personality of an Accord. The HD, on the other hand, was a revelation. Yes, it shakes and rattles at idle, and the handling is a little ponderous, but it quiets down as the rpm rise yet never loses its visceral, mechanical presence. It feels like a motorcycle. If you are sensitive to such things, you'll understand. If you are not, no explaining will help. Me, I love the beast.

/would rather ride than shine chrome, the bike shows it !
 
2013-02-10 01:27:13 PM

geekbikerskum: A lot of these older guys are re-entry riders who are getting a motorcycle again after a layoff of 10 or 20 years or more.  A lot of people give up riding when they have kids, figuring they don't want to leave their families without a breadwinner and/or with only one parent.


That is true. And as we get older the urge to regain that feeling of freedom can be pretty strong. Though we hadn't met each yet, my future wife and I shared the same circle of riding/racing friends. When we got married I gave up club racing & riding (financial decision). For the first three years after getting married I didn't have a bike. I started  looking for one about the time she got pregnant and she told me flat out "If want one you better get it now, 'cause this baby's going to be priority number one for the next 18yrs".

So I did and when my daughter was old enough to wear the gear, I took her riding. All my riding friends have done the same. I'm glad I didn't wait +18yrs to get back to it.
 
2013-02-10 01:31:38 PM

AngryDesertDweller: I got off my Harley back in the early 80's when my kids were little. Would I get back on a bike today ? HELL NO !!! ..... I think driving is #3 on the list when in the car.


And sadly, this. After getting my proper license and taking the MSF 3-day course, I was walking through Harvard Square in Cambridge. A student walked across the street, and was knocked out of her shoes by someone running the light, right in front of me.

The first thing I though was, if she wasn't seen, what kind of a chance do I have on a Bike? I then saw the 'Masshole' drivers (of which I was one) in an entirely different light and it scared the crap out of me.

I get that it's a balance, but riding in a seriously congested area (like a city) is beyond me. That doesn't mean I relax my vigilance elsewhere; the sheer number of times I've seen people make left-hand turns while only looking right is jaw-dropping by itself.
 
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