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(BBC)   Scientists determine that newly discovered 17 million digit prime number has no practical use. Wetness of water still in debate   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 28
    More: Obvious, Mr. Cooper, University of Central Missouri, primes  
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1555 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Feb 2013 at 10:18 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-08 09:43:48 AM
Here's a whitepaper on why very large prime numbers are important in cryptography.

http://www.sans.org/reading_room/whitepapers/vpns/prime-numbers-publ ic -key-cryptography_969
 
2013-02-08 10:19:58 AM
Oh yeah? Well .9infinity = 1
 
2013-02-08 10:32:32 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_prime

Prime number goes in - CSS decrypting executable file comes out.
The number itself (in binary) is an executable file that decrypts CSS encrypted files.

My mind is being blown by this. Seriously.
 
2013-02-08 10:32:59 AM
Scientists determine that newly discovered 17 million digit prime number has no practical use. Wetness of water still in debate

I bet if you memorized it, you could be a big hit with the ladies
 
2013-02-08 10:40:13 AM
I'm using it it as the combination on my luggage.
 
2013-02-08 11:20:00 AM
It is therefore not an optimum prime.
 
2013-02-08 11:36:39 AM

Mayhem of the Black Underclass: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_prime

Prime number goes in - CSS decrypting executable file comes out.
The number itself (in binary) is an executable file that decrypts CSS encrypted files.

My mind is being blown by this. Seriously.


Dude, now think of this. It's a really long prime number, you'd think a prime number would have maximum entropy, but yet you can resolve it into the form k·256n + b.
 
2013-02-08 11:47:23 AM
we should include it on the sequence of prime numbers we send to aliens.  for all we know, the really smart aliens capable of interstellar travel receive prime number sequences from all sorts of civilizations at about our level or below our level of advancement. By adding some larger prime number, we'd be giving our resume a little something extra to stand out from those other planets.
 
2013-02-08 11:55:37 AM
Now can someone please prove the Riemann hypothesis?
 
2013-02-08 12:51:43 PM

kbronsito: we should include it on the sequence of prime numbers we send to aliens.  for all we know, the really smart aliens capable of interstellar travel receive prime number sequences from all sorts of civilizations at about our level or below our level of advancement. By adding some larger prime number, we'd be giving our resume a little something extra to stand out from those other planets.


Or we'd look like the 5-year-old child who writes his name, then looks up to his parents for approval.
 
2013-02-08 12:54:16 PM

Drexl's Eye: It is therefore not an optimum prime.


i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-08 01:02:32 PM
Water is only wet under certain parameters.
 
2013-02-08 01:50:11 PM

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: Mayhem of the Black Underclass: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_prime

Prime number goes in - CSS decrypting executable file comes out.
The number itself (in binary) is an executable file that decrypts CSS encrypted files.

My mind is being blown by this. Seriously.

Dude, now think of this. It's a really long prime number, you'd think a prime number would have maximum entropy, but yet you can resolve it into the form k·256n + b.


2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-08 01:50:36 PM

Mega Steve: Scientists determine that newly discovered 17 million digit prime number has no practical use. Wetness of water still in debate

I bet if you memorized it, you could be a big hit with the ladies


At 17 million digits you'd never succeed in reciting it to anyone.
 
2013-02-08 02:15:46 PM

alaric3: Mega Steve: Scientists determine that newly discovered 17 million digit prime number has no practical use. Wetness of water still in debate

I bet if you memorized it, you could be a big hit with the ladies

At 17 million digits you'd never succeed in reciting it to anyone.


If you're trying to recite it in decimal, then yes, it's quite hard.  But if you're reciting it in binary, it's easy: 111111111111111....1, with 57885161 ones.
 
2013-02-08 02:18:43 PM
My town made the news, yay.

/This is the third prime number he has discovered
//I guess he has a bit of an advantage though since he uses 1,000 university computers to do the work.
 
2013-02-08 03:24:34 PM
Suckmaster Burstingfoam:
Dude, now think of this. It's a really long prime number, you'd think a prime number would have maximum entropy, but yet you can resolve it into the form k·256n + b.

Why would a prime number have maximum entropy? That would mean it cannot be described with anything shorter than itself - but it's just the whateverth prime. That's the shorter description.
 
2013-02-08 03:29:37 PM

RexTalionis: Here's a whitepaper on why very large prime numbers are important in cryptography.

http://www.sans.org/reading_room/whitepapers/vpns/prime-numbers-publ ic -key-cryptography_969


Came here for the obvious, leaving happy.
 
2013-02-08 03:37:12 PM

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: Mayhem of the Black Underclass: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_prime

Prime number goes in - CSS decrypting executable file comes out.
The number itself (in binary) is an executable file that decrypts CSS encrypted files.

My mind is being blown by this. Seriously.

Dude, now think of this. It's a really long prime number, you'd think a prime number would have maximum entropy, but yet you can resolve it into the form k·256n + b.


Not really. I like the twin primes. Where it's (k· 2n-1, k · 2n+1)
 
2013-02-08 03:47:19 PM

WhyteRaven74: Now can someone please prove the Riemann hypothesis?


I *could* but I don't wanna.
 
2013-02-08 08:36:40 PM
Wetness of water-based personal lubricants is established.
 
2013-02-08 09:37:11 PM
Giant prime numbers aren't just used in spy-type cryptography--because financial information and other secrets need to be encrypted, they are the bedrock of electronic commerce and finance, from the smallest bit-coin to the biggest dark pool of financal instrument trading where tens of trillions of dollars (more money than there is in the world sometimes, changes hands each day). A really big prime number makes it just a little harder to crack this information and say, steal billions of dollars from banks or credit card companies or eBay. But you know how snobby mathematicians are about pure versus applied mathematics.

The problem is that thanks precisely to work like this guy and his collaborators do, it gets harder and harder for cryptography to remain truly secure. It's relatively easy, for example, to crack pseudo-random number generators and win a lot of money playing the lotteries.

Mind you, it's always been a race--the important thing about a code is not that it holds out but how long. Information has a best-before date on it, and all a good code has to do is hold out long enough. Most of the secret documents that cause me so much trouble at work are only secret during the drafting and pre-announcement stage. In fact, a lot of them are seriously over-classified and contain nothing you could not get from public sources.

When I worked for the Department of National Defence I always said that the military would classify the existence of the Moon as a secret if it was mentioned in a secret document.

Once a photographer at a press conference by a Cabinet Minister got a photo of a tax document that hadn't been released yet and they cancelled the whole deal because you could read some details in the photo. There's big money in play if a big corporation or a rich family gets their hands on tax changes even hours before they come into effect.

By the way, if you think a crash on the NYSE is bad news, just wait until one of these virtual money markets goes splat. More money than there is in the world. Think about it. It would be the biggest financal crash since the one that caused Magrathea to stop making bespoke planets in the world of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
 
2013-02-08 09:39:14 PM
They interviewed the guy who "found it".  The guy who found it was just some guy running other people's software to look for it.  Like a seti-at-home concept.  Asking him what use it is, gives the predicable result.  He's not really sure.

Every large prime we find helps out map out the distribution and frequency of primes, which we still don't understand.  Helps us understand the properties of primes as a whole - which in turn helps us understand the fundamental nature of numbers.  Helps develop newer more efficient sieves to find them.  Given a graph with millions of data points, sure maybe removing one doesn't make a difference - unless it was special in some way, like being the largest known.  And every new point helps.
 
2013-02-08 11:21:22 PM
That's how the mathematicians want it.  They were pissed when the computer scientists came in and started using their prime number theories and modular arithmetic for cryptography.

sure haven't: Oh yeah? Well .9infinity = 1


And to anyone who doesn't agree with this, what number would you add to 0.9 repeating to get to 1?
 
2013-02-08 11:35:38 PM
Nature doesn't use Pi.

Fibonacci FTW.
 
2013-02-09 12:05:14 AM

davideggy: That's how the mathematicians want it.  They were pissed when the computer scientists came in and started using their prime number theories and modular arithmetic for cryptography.

sure haven't: Oh yeah? Well .9infinity = 1

And to anyone who doesn't agree with this, what number would you add to 0.9 repeating to get to 1?


That's easy, 0.{9 repeating} + 0.{0 repeating}1 = 1

On that note, if 0.9~ = 1, then does 0.0~1 = 0?
 
2013-02-09 10:20:19 AM

Shan: davideggy: That's how the mathematicians want it.  They were pissed when the computer scientists came in and started using their prime number theories and modular arithmetic for cryptography.

sure haven't: Oh yeah? Well .9infinity = 1

And to anyone who doesn't agree with this, what number would you add to 0.9 repeating to get to 1?

That's easy, 0.{9 repeating} + 0.{0 repeating}1 = 1

On that note, if 0.9~ = 1, then does 0.0~1 = 0?


Dude.  Stop.  We already had this argument.  If you want to continue it, go to that thread.  This thread is about primes.
 
2013-02-09 11:26:43 AM

blue_2501: Shan: davideggy: That's how the mathematicians want it.  They were pissed when the computer scientists came in and started using their prime number theories and modular arithmetic for cryptography.

sure haven't: Oh yeah? Well .9infinity = 1

And to anyone who doesn't agree with this, what number would you add to 0.9 repeating to get to 1?

That's easy, 0.{9 repeating} + 0.{0 repeating}1 = 1

On that note, if 0.9~ = 1, then does 0.0~1 = 0?

Dude.  Stop.  We already had this argument.  If you want to continue it, go to that thread.  This thread is about primes.


Couple of things, first your sarcasm meter must be broken because I was making a joke; second I don't know what argument or thread you're referencing, so maybe check to see if I was a part of whatever ruffled your feathers before starting shiat.  I was replying to something in  this thread.
 
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