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(Miami Herald)   If you're part of Florida's Python Challenge, try not to go so deep into the Everglades you become stranded and disoriented   (miamiherald.com) divider line 42
    More: Florida, Florida's Python Challenge, Everglades, Mike Jachles  
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2847 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Feb 2013 at 7:47 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-08 07:39:37 AM
To be fair, becoming stranded and disoriented is how most people end up in Florida to begin with.
 
2013-02-08 07:52:47 AM
Python got your grannie
 
2013-02-08 07:53:03 AM
According to Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue spokesman Mike Jachles, a call came in shortly before 4 p.m. that the hunters, 22 and 25 years old and from Tennessee, were stranded 15 miles west of U.S. 27 near the Broward-Palm Beach County line.

RTheyead more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/02/07/3222912/stranded-python-hunters - rescued.html#storylink=cpy
These guys must have felt like they were taken to another place. Taken to another land.
 
2013-02-08 07:57:48 AM
How anyone can get lost in Florida is beyond me. Walk east or west till you hit the beach, then ask someone where the fark you're at. Duh.
 
2013-02-08 07:58:47 AM
I've driven down Alligator Alley (a road that goes straight through the Everglades and pretty much the only way to get to Miami from the north) at night several times and it's scary as hell. A few times it was back when you couldn't get cell phone reception there and if you broke down you were farked. I can't imagine actually going into the Everglades, especially considering my crippling fear of snakes. Which sucks because it's a perfect place to dump bodies.
 
2013-02-08 08:00:33 AM
ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2013-02-08 08:01:57 AM
This would be a better show than 90% of the crap on TLC.
 
2013-02-08 08:06:06 AM

Mugato: I can't imagine actually going into the Everglades, especially considering my crippling fear of snakes. Which sucks because it's a perfect place to dump bodies.


There's always Waste Management in Jersey,  Mugato.  You always have options, when it comes to dumping bodies.
 
2013-02-08 08:11:44 AM

SDRR: How anyone can get lost in Florida is beyond me. Walk east or west till you hit the beach, then ask someone where the fark you're at. Duh.


My outdoorsman uncle taught me this little lesson once when he took me fishing.  In a place people have reportedly gotten lost for days at.  And it's less than 10 miles from the coast.

Mugato: I've driven down Alligator Alley (a road that goes straight through the Everglades and pretty much the only way to get to Miami from the north)


Maybe from the west coast of Florida, but there's a number of options to head down to Miami from the east coast.  If you're heading down there from Naples (or maybe even Tampa), it's the only way, then.
 
2013-02-08 08:13:13 AM

abhorrent1: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 300x300]


Pretty much this. Maps, even topographical maps, are useless in the Everglades unless you happen to be around an easily identifiable geographic area or are quite good at IDing hydrological features. Especially in an angular sun like we have now.
 
2013-02-08 08:33:23 AM
Additionally, those of you using python costumes to inflitrate snake dens, costumes are NOW PROHIBITED.
That's 2 snake kills, 9 friendlies.
 
2013-02-08 08:37:40 AM
Why do all these people want to kill Python? Language flame wars are so 1998.

/ I kid
// ruby sucks
 
2013-02-08 08:40:05 AM

PC LOAD LETTER: abhorrent1: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 300x300]

Pretty much this. Maps, even topographical maps, are useless in the Everglades unless you happen to be around an easily identifiable geographic area or are quite good at IDing hydrological features. Especially in an angular sun like we have now.


Meh.  Seems like most roads in that area go either North-South or East-West.  If you carry a compass, something pretty much everyone should have in the woods  even if you have a GPS, all you have to do is say to yourself "OK, I headed west from the road.  To get back to the same road, I must now head east".  Then, if you are totally bad at figureing out what direction you are headed using the sun, stars, or other clues (or if it's overcast), use the compass to guide you.
 
2013-02-08 08:42:39 AM
I am guessing that they lost their GPS with their smartphone reception.
 
2013-02-08 08:42:59 AM

bopeuph: Mugato: I've driven down Alligator Alley (a road that goes straight through the Everglades and pretty much the only way to get to Miami from the north)

Maybe from the west coast of Florida, but there's a number of options to head down to Miami from the east coast. If you're heading down there from Naples (or maybe even Tampa), it's the only way, then.


Yeah, that's why I said "pretty much". It is a bottleneck though, to get to such a big city (thanks for nixing the speed rail, Scott).
 
2013-02-08 08:43:30 AM
Those weren't hunters. They were bait.
 
2013-02-08 08:46:58 AM

dittybopper: PC LOAD LETTER: abhorrent1: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 300x300]

Pretty much this. Maps, even topographical maps, are useless in the Everglades unless you happen to be around an easily identifiable geographic area or are quite good at IDing hydrological features. Especially in an angular sun like we have now.

Meh.  Seems like most roads in that area go either North-South or East-West.  If you carry a compass, something pretty much everyone should have in the woods  even if you have a GPS, all you have to do is say to yourself "OK, I headed west from the road.  To get back to the same road, I must now head east".  Then, if you are totally bad at figureing out what direction you are headed using the sun, stars, or other clues (or if it's overcast), use the compass to guide you.


In some areas, yes, but it depends on where you are. Good luck in the southwest portions of the Everglades. There are pretty much zero roads for dozens of miles.
 
2013-02-08 08:55:35 AM
Have these idiots never heard of water purification tablets?  Or a compass?
 
2013-02-08 09:03:29 AM
Temperatures were in the 80's.  Oh my.
 
2013-02-08 09:05:15 AM

TaxiDriver: Temperatures were in the 80's.  Oh my.


If only they were surrounded by some type of liquid they could use to cool themselves.
 
2013-02-08 09:08:05 AM

bopeuph: SDRR: How anyone can get lost in Florida is beyond me. Walk east or west till you hit the beach, then ask someone where the fark you're at. Duh.

My outdoorsman uncle taught me this little lesson once when he took me fishing.  In a place people have reportedly gotten lost for days at.  And it's less than 10 miles from the coast.

Mugato: I've driven down Alligator Alley (a road that goes straight through the Everglades and pretty much the only way to get to Miami from the north)

Maybe from the west coast of Florida, but there's a number of options to head down to Miami from the east coast.  If you're heading down there from Naples (or maybe even Tampa), it's the only way, then.


The Alley is for sissies... real adventure driverists take the Tamiami trail.  Ta... Miami, get it?
 
2013-02-08 09:09:39 AM

TaxiDriver: Temperatures were in the 80's.  Oh my.


That might be considered hot if you're from Tennessee.
 
2013-02-08 09:14:10 AM
Idiots that don't know how to navigate a swamp.  For those saying to use the stars or sun, it can be quite hard when you are under dense canopy.  The only real breaks in the tree tops that give you a good view are usually deeper bodies of water where the tree don't grow. A GPS or compass is your best bet.  The hardest part is that there is no straight line views or paths.  You have to divert quite bit more due to water ways and dense vegetation compared to a temperate forest terrain.  If you are traveling in a small boat, this get even more difficult as you can only do in the direction the water goes, unless you wan to port through mud and such. As far was water purification, some of the Everglades is brackish.  Not sure where these doofuses were, but purification doesn't help with salt water.
 
2013-02-08 09:15:06 AM

PC LOAD LETTER: abhorrent1: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 300x300]

Pretty much this. Maps, even topographical maps, are useless in the Everglades unless you happen to be around an easily identifiable geographic area or are quite good at IDing hydrological features. Especially in an angular sun like we have now.


Interesting. I do most of my hiking in mountains and it's relatively easy to not get too lost, although, people do. Head for or away from that giant towering peak that you can see from everywhere is a good enough approximation if your route finding, GPS, or compass and map skills have failed.

Clearly these guys were dumbasses though to not have enough water (or water purification) to survive figuring out a route back.
 
2013-02-08 09:15:09 AM

PC LOAD LETTER: dittybopper: PC LOAD LETTER: abhorrent1: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 300x300]

Pretty much this. Maps, even topographical maps, are useless in the Everglades unless you happen to be around an easily identifiable geographic area or are quite good at IDing hydrological features. Especially in an angular sun like we have now.

Meh.  Seems like most roads in that area go either North-South or East-West.  If you carry a compass, something pretty much everyone should have in the woods  even if you have a GPS, all you have to do is say to yourself "OK, I headed west from the road.  To get back to the same road, I must now head east".  Then, if you are totally bad at figureing out what direction you are headed using the sun, stars, or other clues (or if it's overcast), use the compass to guide you.

In some areas, yes, but it depends on where you are. Good luck in the southwest portions of the Everglades. There are pretty much zero roads for dozens of miles.


But you had to start from a road, right?  That's how you got access to the area, after all, and if you managed to hike dozens of miles in a straight line, you should have been prepared to spend the night anyway.
 
2013-02-08 09:20:00 AM

wingnut396: Idiots that don't know how to navigate a swamp.  For those saying to use the stars or sun, it can be quite hard when you are under dense canopy.  The only real breaks in the tree tops that give you a good view are usually deeper bodies of water where the tree don't grow. A GPS or compass is your best bet.  The hardest part is that there is no straight line views or paths.  You have to divert quite bit more due to water ways and dense vegetation compared to a temperate forest terrain.  If you are traveling in a small boat, this get even more difficult as you can only do in the direction the water goes, unless you wan to port through mud and such. As far was water purification, some of the Everglades is brackish.  Not sure where these doofuses were, but purification doesn't help with salt water.


Interesting about the brackish water. Can we make this an interesting facts about hiking thread?
 
2013-02-08 09:25:31 AM
Maybe from the west coast of Florida, but there's a number of options to head down to Miami from the east coast.  If you're heading down there from Naples (or maybe even Tampa), it's the only way, then.

Actually, there IS another way. You can take Route 41 (Tamiami Trail) from Naples to Homestead/Miami.  You think Alligator Alley is scary...
 
2013-02-08 09:25:51 AM

wingnut396: Idiots that don't know how to navigate a swamp.  For those saying to use the stars or sun, it can be quite hard when you are under dense canopy.


During daylight, you can still tell which direction the sun is in, provided it's not overcast.  I've been in really, really, REALLY thick jungle in Hawai'i, and during the day I could still figure out direction based upon time of day and sun position.   I've also been in really, really dense woods up in the 'dacks, and the same situation there:  You can't see any significant amount of sky due to the canopy, but you can tell where the sun is approximately, and that's really all you need.

But yeah, always have a compass.  Always.  Even if you have a GeniusPhone and GPS.   Doesn't have to be a fancy one, a simple one is good enough for emergency navigation.

I used to have an "emergency compass" my father made for me.  It was a sheet steel silhouette of a fish that had been magnetized, and it had a hole at the balance point and some thread tied to the hole.  I kept it in my wallet.  If you suspended it in still air or water (water was best), it would point north.  You could do the same thing with a steel needle and a magnet.

Ironically, I lost that fish years ago.
 
2013-02-08 09:29:57 AM

Farkin A Bubba: I am guessing that they lost their GPS with their smartphone reception.


Maybe, if they dropped the smartphone in the water at the same time they lost phone service.
 
2013-02-08 09:33:25 AM
The military sent me into the Everglades for survival training before it became socially unacceptable to do so. I took a straight line to my Aunt Leora's house and fed on fried chicken and beans for a week. She no longer lives there, but I'll be the house still stands.

/came out fat and sleek
//csb
 
2013-02-08 09:43:55 AM

LadySusan: As far was water purification, some of the Everglades is brackish.  Not sure where these doofuses were, but purification doesn't help with salt water.

Interesting about the brackish water. Can we make this an interesting facts about hiking thread?


You can take the salt out of brackish water by boiling and recondensing the steam.  As an added bonus, it also purifies the water of nasty germs.

One interesting idea I've seen is the use of a pressure cooker along with some copper tubing to make a still.  Not the sort of thing you might use out camping, but if you were in an area where flooding with salt or brackish water is a distinct possibility (like New Orleans after Katrina), it would certainly be a viable option.  If you lived in such an area, having something like that prepared ahead of time might not be a bad idea.
 
2013-02-08 09:45:48 AM

dittybopper: wingnut396: Idiots that don't know how to navigate a swamp.  For those saying to use the stars or sun, it can be quite hard when you are under dense canopy.

During daylight, you can still tell which direction the sun is in, provided it's not overcast.  I've been in really, really, REALLY thick jungle in Hawai'i, and during the day I could still figure out direction based upon time of day and sun position.   I've also been in really, really dense woods up in the 'dacks, and the same situation there:  You can't see any significant amount of sky due to the canopy, but you can tell where the sun is approximately, and that's really all you need.

But yeah, always have a compass.  Always.  Even if you have a GeniusPhone and GPS.   Doesn't have to be a fancy one, a simple one is good enough for emergency navigation.

I used to have an "emergency compass" my father made for me.  It was a sheet steel silhouette of a fish that had been magnetized, and it had a hole at the balance point and some thread tied to the hole.  I kept it in my wallet.  If you suspended it in still air or water (water was best), it would point north.  You could do the same thing with a steel needle and a magnet.

Ironically, I lost that fish years ago.


Yeah, in full sun, you should be able to get a general idea.  But even a moderately cloudy sky can trick you pretty well.  Add to that if  these guys were in something like a pirogue or other small boat, the direction you can take is severely limited.

Of course they were able to call for help, so they had to hit a cell tower I guess, so I don't really know.

I think the one thing we can safely assume is that they are idiots.
 
2013-02-08 09:48:26 AM

dittybopper: You can take the salt out of brackish water by boiling and recondensing the steam.  As an added bonus, it also purifies the water of nasty germs.


Was responding to the use of tablets.  I suspect that if a couple of TN yahoo living in their car and doing down to FL to hunt snakes had a still... well... I'd be surprised if they were going to use it to purify water.
 
2013-02-08 09:50:53 AM

wingnut396: Idiots that don't know how to navigate a swamp.  For those saying to use the stars or sun, it can be quite hard when you are under dense canopy.  The only real breaks in the tree tops that give you a good view are usually deeper bodies of water where the tree don't grow. A GPS or compass is your best bet.  The hardest part is that there is no straight line views or paths.  You have to divert quite bit more due to water ways and dense vegetation compared to a temperate forest terrain.  If you are traveling in a small boat, this get even more difficult as you can only do in the direction the water goes, unless you wan to port through mud and such. As far was water purification, some of the Everglades is brackish.  Not sure where these doofuses were, but purification doesn't help with salt water.


They were no where near brackish water.  Nor were they anywhere near "dense canopy."  They were in the Everglades, ie... the River of Grass.

Now go on tell me more store about navigating in swamps and other shiat you see on TV.
 
2013-02-08 09:54:04 AM

wingnut396: Idiots that don't know how to navigate a swamp.  For those saying to use the stars or sun, it can be quite hard when you are under dense canopy.  The only real breaks in the tree tops that give you a good view are usually deeper bodies of water where the tree don't grow. A GPS or compass is your best bet.  The hardest part is that there is no straight line views or paths.  You have to divert quite bit more due to water ways and dense vegetation compared to a temperate forest terrain.  If you are traveling in a small boat, this get even more difficult as you can only do in the direction the water goes, unless you wan to port through mud and such. As far was water purification, some of the Everglades is brackish.  Not sure where these doofuses were, but purification doesn't help with salt water.


Most of the everglades is endless miles of sawgrass and waist deep water. Seeing the sun and stars is less of a problem than being out in the sun with little or no shade. You're right about the water. I was wondering how long it was going to take some of these out of staters to get stranded. Im surprised it has been this long and only 2 of them.
 
2013-02-08 10:04:41 AM
Doesn't anybody wear a watch anymore? It's the easiest thing to use as a rudimentary compass. I won't go into the particulars here, as this is not the learning channel, and those living down under have to do it backwards.
 
2013-02-08 10:28:47 AM
t2.gstatic.com

Maybe they should have listened better, and learned to work together.
 
2013-02-08 10:39:17 AM
FTA: We had temperature in the 80s

I'm in the east Tennessee and I'm insanely jealous of Florida

/is mid 40's and raining here
 
2013-02-08 10:46:40 AM
karmaceutical:

They were no where near brackish water.  Nor were they anywhere near "dense canopy."  They were in the Everglades, ie... the River of Grass.

Now go on tell me more store about navigating in swamps and other shiat you see on TV.


I stated I was not sure where they were located. I looked at the map and see they were pretty far north. That looks like pretty nasty scrub to move through.. but seeing that, yeah, the should have been able to look up and move east/west and hit the flipping highway.

My experience comes from swamps and march comes from a bit west of the Everglades, not TV.  Its strange as the dense swap with fresh water is further north and the high grass, brackish marsh is further south and closer to the coast.
 
2013-02-08 11:01:41 AM

abhorrent1: TaxiDriver: Temperatures were in the 80's.  Oh my.

If only they were surrounded by some type of liquid they could use to cool themselves.


The liquid contains potassium benzoate.
 
2013-02-08 11:15:01 AM
If there's one thing I've learned from reading Carl Hiasson books, its that if you're stranded in the Everglades some crazy dude that lives out there will come across you and help you out.
 
2013-02-08 04:36:37 PM
It's ...
 
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