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(Mother Nature Network)   15 college courses that will make you want to go back to school (slideshow warning)   (mnn.com) divider line 17
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18191 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Feb 2013 at 4:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-06 02:32:11 PM
5 votes:

whistleridge: "Can Nietzsche's rejection of traditional morality justify Bart's bad behavior?"

Short answer: 'no'.

Long answer:

If one accepts that Bart isfundamentallynihilistic then maybe - but then, as a 'child' wouldn't that be expected - at least to a degree?

If so, then Lisa counterpoints with more enlightenment, idealism - and [occasionally] refreshing cynicism. Homer and Marge represent their 'role' models, respectively. Maggie, perhaps more of a blank canvas, exhibits both - sometimes in unexpected ways.

If we believe the Simpsons is an allegory for contempory American society (and not just America), then Bart's behaviouris justified if only because contemporary America has deemed it so. If wedon't then perhaps he's just a character in a satirical cartoon show.

It's amusing perhaps because it hits close to home. It forces us to laugh at some aspects of our own nature we may not otherwise be comfortable with, were they subject to more 'objective' scrutiny.

If [many] people didn't [even on a subconcious level] aspire to emulate some of Bart/Homer's disregard for convention then it would have no resonance. The same could be said of Lisa/Marge's aim to 'do the right thing'. Perhaps Mr. Burns represents some derivative of an Orwellian state ... and so on!

Homer's behaviour is excused because he's [portrayed as] an idiot, Bart because he's a nihilistic child who emulates his Father. Marge because she's [portrayed as] intelligent but frustrated with many aspects of her life, perhaps rueing some of the choices she made along the way. Lisa because she's an idealistic child who emulates her Mother.

It's also true that that blamingpoliticians and legislation (while certainly a factor) is a convenient vehicle to avoid individual responsibility for what we collectively dislike about contempory society. After all, it's much rarer to heap praise on official organs for the things we dolike, isn't it we tend to reserve that accolade unto ourselves, so one might ask ... why is t ...


My cat's breath smells like cat food.
2013-02-06 04:16:15 PM
3 votes:
sulco:  Ever had real maple syrup that you've harvesting and cooked down yourself?

I think I need to retake the grammar class.
2013-02-06 04:35:55 PM
2 votes:

sulco: I think I need to retake the grammar class.


I think I need to read two posts further down the page before snarking.
2013-02-06 04:48:03 PM
1 votes:

pizen: Rings'". It was basically a waste but I needed a class in that department to fulfill a degree requirement.


I had to fill a degree requirement, so I ended up taking Spy Fiction. But what was really sad is that I *wanted* to take a Technical Writing class, but doing so wouldn't count towards my degree... in Computer Science.
2013-02-06 04:38:29 PM
1 votes:

whistleridge: "Can Nietzsche's rejection of traditional morality justify Bart's bad behavior?"

Short answer: 'no'.

Long answer:

If one accepts that Bart isfundamentallynihilistic then maybe - but then, as a 'child' wouldn't that be expected - at least to a degree?

If so, then Lisa counterpoints with more enlightenment, idealism - and [occasionally] refreshing cynicism. Homer and Marge represent their 'role' models, respectively. Maggie, perhaps more of a blank canvas, exhibits both - sometimes in unexpected ways.

If we believe the Simpsons is an allegory for contempory American society (and not just America), then Bart's behaviouris justified if only because contemporary America has deemed it so. If wedon't then perhaps he's just a character in a satirical cartoon show.

It's amusing perhaps because it hits close to home. It forces us to laugh at some aspects of our own nature we may not otherwise be comfortable with, were they subject to more 'objective' scrutiny.

If [many] people didn't [even on a subconcious level] aspire to emulate some of Bart/Homer's disregard for convention then it would have no resonance. The same could be said of Lisa/Marge's aim to 'do the right thing'. Perhaps Mr. Burns represents some derivative of an Orwellian state ... and so on!

Homer's behaviour is excused because he's [portrayed as] an idiot, Bart because he's a nihilistic child who emulates his Father. Marge because she's [portrayed as] intelligent but frustrated with many aspects of her life, perhaps rueing some of the choices she made along the way. Lisa because she's an idealistic child who emulates her Mother.

It's also true that that blamingpoliticians and legislation (while certainly a factor) is a convenient vehicle to avoid individual responsibility for what we collectively dislike about contempory society. After all, it's much rarer to heap praise on official organs for the things we dolike, isn't it we tend to reserve that accolade unto ourselves, so one might ask ... why is t ...


Short answer: "Yes with an if..."
Long answer: "No with a but..."
2013-02-06 04:37:19 PM
1 votes:
My Favorite 3 classes my last semester at Purdue:

Bugs: Friend or Foe (Entomology)
Human Sexuality (we watched porn) (Psychology)
Wine Appreciation (we drank in class) (RHIT)

That was how you finish strong (also took Intro to acting that semester)
2013-02-06 04:36:21 PM
1 votes:
I took an English course - third year, at that - on the works of Carlos Castaneda.

We spent a grand total of about three hours actually discussing the works of Castaneda. We only covered the three "Yaqui" books, at that.

The entire rest of the course featured the class sitting in the room with the teacher and talking about whatever we felt like. Some times, he played guitar. There were no tests.

/got an A, along with everyone else who bothered to show up
//the rest? B.
///Yes, including the guy who basically dropped out in October and left town
2013-02-06 04:35:33 PM
1 votes:
In other news, college professors offer amusing seminar courses to introduce subject matter in a topical and offbeat way.
2013-02-06 04:29:47 PM
1 votes:

give me doughnuts: The University of Kentucky offers a class in the history of UK basketball.


Because the jocks need history credits.
2013-02-06 04:29:03 PM
1 votes:
15 college courses that will make you want to go back to school colleges more money

FTFY subby
2013-02-06 04:27:12 PM
1 votes:
I know every generation says it, but Generation Y is going to be the United States downfall.
2013-02-06 04:24:31 PM
1 votes:
Maple Syrup: The Real Thing
Vermont kids get that before 1st grade.
2013-02-06 04:22:17 PM
1 votes:
Back when I was in college, you could take month-long classes between semesters. They were generally the younger professors' only chance to use their imaginations in course creation. It tended that the more "fru-fru" the class, the more work was actually involved. The course description might make it seem like you're watching a movie every day in class, but it didn't mention that you had to write a paper about each movie.

One class I didn't take, but wish I had, was on the Geography of Food. Why places have different food cultures, that sort of thing. Of course, maybe if I had taken the class I wouldn't be so interested in it today.
2013-02-06 04:20:34 PM
1 votes:
No class makes me want to return to college.

The ample supply of attractive women with loose morals and drinking problems and the easy access to premium green take care of that.
2013-02-06 04:20:17 PM
1 votes:
I used Starcraft for an operations mgmt course, specifically the mining aspect.  It was pretty fun for displaying rudimentary capacity and resource problems.
2013-02-06 03:41:50 PM
1 votes:
underwater basket weaving actually involves making baskets by dipping reeds into water and letting them soak

Oh... oh god.
2013-02-06 01:43:58 PM
1 votes:
 "Can Nietzsche's rejection of traditional morality justify Bart's bad behavior?"

Short answer: 'no'

Long answer:

If one accepts that Bart isfundamentallynihilistic then maybe - but then, as a 'child' wouldn't that be expected - at least to a degree?

If so, then Lisa counterpoints with more enlightenment, idealism - and [occasionally] refreshing cynicism. Homer and Marge represent their 'role' models, respectively. Maggie, perhaps more of a blank canvas, exhibits both - sometimes in unexpected ways.

If we believe the Simpsons is an allegory for contempory American society (and not just America), then Bart's behaviouris justified if only because contemporary America has deemed it so. If wedon't then perhaps he's just a character in a satirical cartoon show.

It's amusing perhaps because it hits close to home. It forces us to laugh at some aspects of our own nature we may not otherwise be comfortable with, were they subject to more 'objective' scrutiny.

If [many] people didn't [even on a subconcious level] aspire to emulate some of Bart/Homer's disregard for convention then it would have no resonance. The same could be said of Lisa/Marge's aim to 'do the right thing'. Perhaps Mr. Burns represents some derivative of an Orwellian state ... and so on!

Homer's behaviour is excused because he's [portrayed as] an idiot, Bart because he's a nihilistic child who emulates his Father. Marge because she's [portrayed as] intelligent but frustrated with many aspects of her life, perhaps rueing some of the choices she made along the way. Lisa because she's an idealistic child who emulates her Mother.

It's also true that that blamingpoliticians and legislation (while certainly a factor) is a convenient vehicle to avoid individual responsibility for what we collectively dislike about contempory society. After all, it's much rarer to heap praise on official organs for the things we dolike, isn't it we tend to reserve that accolade unto ourselves, so one might ask ... why is that?
 
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