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(Mother Nature Network)   15 college courses that will make you want to go back to school (slideshow warning)   (mnn.com) divider line 15
    More: Amusing, Women's Studies, college courses  
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18196 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Feb 2013 at 4:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-02-06 01:14:42 PM
7 votes:
2013-02-06 04:35:33 PM
3 votes:
In other news, college professors offer amusing seminar courses to introduce subject matter in a topical and offbeat way.
2013-02-06 04:29:47 PM
2 votes:

give me doughnuts: The University of Kentucky offers a class in the history of UK basketball.


Because the jocks need history credits.
2013-02-06 02:33:34 PM
2 votes:
I've taken a version of the garbage class.  It was mostly a history of urban infrastructure & planning.  It was fascinating.
2013-02-06 08:49:27 PM
1 votes:

dericwater: abfalter: Central Michigan University used to (and perhaps still does) teach two courses with whimsical names; Physics for Poets and Armchair Chemistry.  Both were math-light 100 level courses on their respective topics.

For 99% of the population, that's really all you need to know in regards to physics and chemistry. I mean, if you're not a chemist, why the heck do you need to know anything about the difference between an ionic bond and a covalent bond? Or the energy levels of electrons? Or what happens when atoms are squeezed into very, very tight conditions like in a star?


There are plenty of reasons to know more than just the basic Three Rs. Sheer curiosity. To know when you're actually being sold snake oil or a budget proposal that's complete BS. The ability to intelligently argue a point on Fark.  That's why a GED in with double majors in Law/Political Science is required for the Politics tab.
2013-02-06 04:43:49 PM
1 votes:

Fark Rye For Many Whores: underwater basket weaving actually involves making baskets by dipping reeds into water and letting them soak

Oh... oh god.


3.bp.blogspot.com

The stock photo they used was actually of a sweetgrass basket being woven.  Those things take time, so they are correspondingly very expensive.  To make a small one, maybe a day's weaving, and around $150.  Bigger ones - of an actually useful size - can take a few days, and go for several hundred.  That's if you're buying one from an average maker;  baskets by known artists can go for thousands.

Of course, the people who make them sure as fark didn't go to college to learn how.
2013-02-06 04:40:49 PM
1 votes:

vudukungfu: give me doughnuts: The University of Kentucky offers a class in the history of UK basketball.

Because the jocks need history credits.



Gotta keep them eligible somehow.
2013-02-06 04:37:21 PM
1 votes:

Krieghund: Back when I was in college, you could take month-long classes between semesters. They were generally the younger professors' only chance to use their imaginations in course creation. It tended that the more "fru-fru" the class, the more work was actually involved. The course description might make it seem like you're watching a movie every day in class, but it didn't mention that you had to write a paper about each movie.

One class I didn't take, but wish I had, was on the Geography of Food. Why places have different food cultures, that sort of thing. Of course, maybe if I had taken the class I wouldn't be so interested in it today.


I took Wilderness Living Techniques.  I expected to learn how to identify edible plants, find which way is north by making a compass out of a needle, start a fire from scratch, but it was pretty lame.   We just goofed off in class all semester and then went camping one night, and got really wasted in the woods.  Which isn't awful, but I still don't know if I should eated the purple berry or not.
2013-02-06 04:24:31 PM
1 votes:
Maple Syrup: The Real Thing
Vermont kids get that before 1st grade.
2013-02-06 04:22:17 PM
1 votes:
Back when I was in college, you could take month-long classes between semesters. They were generally the younger professors' only chance to use their imaginations in course creation. It tended that the more "fru-fru" the class, the more work was actually involved. The course description might make it seem like you're watching a movie every day in class, but it didn't mention that you had to write a paper about each movie.

One class I didn't take, but wish I had, was on the Geography of Food. Why places have different food cultures, that sort of thing. Of course, maybe if I had taken the class I wouldn't be so interested in it today.
2013-02-06 03:41:50 PM
1 votes:
underwater basket weaving actually involves making baskets by dipping reeds into water and letting them soak

Oh... oh god.
2013-02-06 03:15:05 PM
1 votes:

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: I've taken a version of the garbage class. It was mostly a history of urban infrastructure & planning. It was fascinating.


I once took a condensed urban studies class over the summer (3 weeks, 5 days a week, 4 hours a day or something like that). We basically were learning about urban planning (Harlem, Park Slope and Brooklyn Heights), modern architecture (saw some really ugly buildings in Manhattan I had never paid attention to), how the city functioned and it's infrastructure. While most of the trips involved visiting different NYC neighborhoods in the late 80s, one trip was to a waste management plant. That was very interesting (and not as stinky as I thought it would be).
2013-02-06 02:32:16 PM
1 votes:
Cyberporn and Society  www.mnn.com

Now there a class I really could fap...er,  get an A in.
2013-02-06 02:32:11 PM
1 votes:

whistleridge: "Can Nietzsche's rejection of traditional morality justify Bart's bad behavior?"

Short answer: 'no'.

Long answer:

If one accepts that Bart isfundamentallynihilistic then maybe - but then, as a 'child' wouldn't that be expected - at least to a degree?

If so, then Lisa counterpoints with more enlightenment, idealism - and [occasionally] refreshing cynicism. Homer and Marge represent their 'role' models, respectively. Maggie, perhaps more of a blank canvas, exhibits both - sometimes in unexpected ways.

If we believe the Simpsons is an allegory for contempory American society (and not just America), then Bart's behaviouris justified if only because contemporary America has deemed it so. If wedon't then perhaps he's just a character in a satirical cartoon show.

It's amusing perhaps because it hits close to home. It forces us to laugh at some aspects of our own nature we may not otherwise be comfortable with, were they subject to more 'objective' scrutiny.

If [many] people didn't [even on a subconcious level] aspire to emulate some of Bart/Homer's disregard for convention then it would have no resonance. The same could be said of Lisa/Marge's aim to 'do the right thing'. Perhaps Mr. Burns represents some derivative of an Orwellian state ... and so on!

Homer's behaviour is excused because he's [portrayed as] an idiot, Bart because he's a nihilistic child who emulates his Father. Marge because she's [portrayed as] intelligent but frustrated with many aspects of her life, perhaps rueing some of the choices she made along the way. Lisa because she's an idealistic child who emulates her Mother.

It's also true that that blamingpoliticians and legislation (while certainly a factor) is a convenient vehicle to avoid individual responsibility for what we collectively dislike about contempory society. After all, it's much rarer to heap praise on official organs for the things we dolike, isn't it we tend to reserve that accolade unto ourselves, so one might ask ... why is t ...


My cat's breath smells like cat food.
2013-02-06 01:43:58 PM
1 votes:
 "Can Nietzsche's rejection of traditional morality justify Bart's bad behavior?"

Short answer: 'no'

Long answer:

If one accepts that Bart isfundamentallynihilistic then maybe - but then, as a 'child' wouldn't that be expected - at least to a degree?

If so, then Lisa counterpoints with more enlightenment, idealism - and [occasionally] refreshing cynicism. Homer and Marge represent their 'role' models, respectively. Maggie, perhaps more of a blank canvas, exhibits both - sometimes in unexpected ways.

If we believe the Simpsons is an allegory for contempory American society (and not just America), then Bart's behaviouris justified if only because contemporary America has deemed it so. If wedon't then perhaps he's just a character in a satirical cartoon show.

It's amusing perhaps because it hits close to home. It forces us to laugh at some aspects of our own nature we may not otherwise be comfortable with, were they subject to more 'objective' scrutiny.

If [many] people didn't [even on a subconcious level] aspire to emulate some of Bart/Homer's disregard for convention then it would have no resonance. The same could be said of Lisa/Marge's aim to 'do the right thing'. Perhaps Mr. Burns represents some derivative of an Orwellian state ... and so on!

Homer's behaviour is excused because he's [portrayed as] an idiot, Bart because he's a nihilistic child who emulates his Father. Marge because she's [portrayed as] intelligent but frustrated with many aspects of her life, perhaps rueing some of the choices she made along the way. Lisa because she's an idealistic child who emulates her Mother.

It's also true that that blamingpoliticians and legislation (while certainly a factor) is a convenient vehicle to avoid individual responsibility for what we collectively dislike about contempory society. After all, it's much rarer to heap praise on official organs for the things we dolike, isn't it we tend to reserve that accolade unto ourselves, so one might ask ... why is that?
 
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