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(Gizmodo) Video This awesome perpetual motion machine may not be perpetual but it's awesome for sure   (gizmodo.com) divider line 107
    More: Video, perpetual motion machines, neodymium magnets  
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11765 clicks; posted to Video » on 06 Feb 2013 at 2:56 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



107 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-02-06 02:55:45 PM  
Meh.  I invented the perpetual inertia machine.  I personally guarantee each and every one to stay at rest when placed at rest, and likewise guaranteed to stay in motion once set in motion*.


*Warranty only applies if machine is not acted upon by outside forces.
 
2013-02-06 02:58:21 PM  
Man I love it when subby puts so much work into coming up with a catchy headline.
 
2013-02-06 03:02:10 PM  
/it just keeps going faster and faster...
 
2013-02-06 03:02:58 PM  

Burr: /it just keeps going faster and faster...


Curse my thrown away image!

/In this house we obey the laws of THERMODYNAMICS!
 
2013-02-06 03:03:58 PM  
It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while.  If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.
 
2013-02-06 03:14:52 PM  

timujin: It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while.  If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.


Guess what happens when you rig it up to a generator.
 
2013-02-06 03:15:58 PM  

timujin: It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while.  If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.


It would have take into account the cost of rare-earth metals and how often the magnets have to be replaced.  Prices have fallen recently but by definition, mineral-based energy is not renewable.
 
2013-02-06 03:17:18 PM  

timujin: It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while.  If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.


There is no way to make that do work or store energy without friction stopping it.
 
2013-02-06 03:18:22 PM  
Hoax:
i63.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-06 03:22:06 PM  

Frozboz: Hoax:
i63.photobucket.com


Well, there you go.
 
2013-02-06 03:25:23 PM  
So has anyone taken the time to determine the efficiency/work transfer of this thing before we all just thumb our noses at it?  Because from what I can tell here this is at least many times more efficient than a simple flywheel, and that's an important part of many systems.  I mean, obviously having a bunch of magnets in a system will make design more complex, but it's not that rare to have magnets in mechanical systems.
 
2013-02-06 03:26:07 PM  

DVDave: Man I love it when subby puts so much work into coming up with a catchy headline.


This bothers me too.  I constantly try to write a funny headline only to constantly be rejected, yet shiat like this gets greened all the time

/bitter
 
2013-02-06 03:26:14 PM  

Frozboz: Hoax:
[i63.photobucket.com image 500x376]


So he's using a little air to keep it going as well, what's the big deal?  Air is free, right?


i3.kym-cdn.com
/oblig
 
2013-02-06 03:27:22 PM  

Tigger: timujin: It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while.  If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.

Guess what happens when you rig it up to a generator.


Explosion? I'm not an expert.
 
2013-02-06 03:30:06 PM  

dittybopper: Meh. I invented the perpetual inertia machine. I personally guarantee each and every one to stay at rest when placed at rest, and likewise guaranteed to stay in motion once set in motion*.

*Warranty only applies if machine is not acted upon by outside forces.


Dear Consumerist: I recently purchased one of Mr. Bopper's machines and at first it seemed to be moving along just fine. But then I switched to a different reference frame and it suddenly stopped! Now the only thing 'perpetual' is the grudge I'm going to hold against this company's shoddy craftsmanship and false advertising.
 
2013-02-06 03:30:26 PM  
What is going on in that hoax picture?
 
2013-02-06 03:30:47 PM  
Then it should be called a "perpetual awesome machine".
 
2013-02-06 03:30:53 PM  
Perpetual motion machines are what happens when the type of person likely to become a 'truther' or moon landing denier happens to be educated and they are no less retarded.
 
2013-02-06 03:33:56 PM  
Since he used "awesome" twice, subby must really like "awesome."

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-02-06 03:35:49 PM  
hrmmmm....yeah on second thought I'm not even sure this would be more efficient than a flywheel.  The energy you are gaining on the accelerating side of the "bump" is the same as on the decelerating side, and the same goes for the little extra work you get from gravity in dropping the rod.  The only difference between this and a flywheel is that a flywheel has less points of contact (less friction)....
 
2013-02-06 03:36:08 PM  

spawn73: What is going on in that hoax picture?


Notice the pneumatic air nozzle pointed at the machine, which is conveniently not shown in the video.
 
2013-02-06 03:36:09 PM  

Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion: Tigger: timujin: It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while.  If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.

Guess what happens when you rig it up to a generator.

Explosion? I'm not an expert.


It will stop because of the resistance introduced by the generator.
 
2013-02-06 03:36:46 PM  

spawn73: What is going on in that hoax picture?


an air jet is causing it to spin, not the magnetic forces.
 
2013-02-06 03:37:44 PM  

Frozboz: spawn73: What is going on in that hoax picture?

Notice the pneumatic air nozzle pointed at the machine, which is conveniently not shown in the video.


Hey, it's perpetual as long as you keep pushing on it!
1. Just don't stop pushing
2. free energy!
3.  Profit

/durr
 
2013-02-06 03:40:09 PM  

rufus-t-firefly: Since he used "awesome" twice, subby must really like "awesome."

[24.media.tumblr.com image 500x282]


Holly cow, when was C.K. on fox?
 
2013-02-06 03:43:24 PM  

Frozboz: spawn73: What is going on in that hoax picture?

Notice the pneumatic air nozzle pointed at the machine, which is conveniently not shown in the video.


Ah yes, that's what it is.

First time I saw it, I told my friend it wouldn't work because this and this, but I couldn't explain how it could accelerate (which it does). But now I know.
 
2013-02-06 03:45:03 PM  

Ivo Shandor: dittybopper: Meh. I invented the perpetual inertia machine. I personally guarantee each and every one to stay at rest when placed at rest, and likewise guaranteed to stay in motion once set in motion*.

*Warranty only applies if machine is not acted upon by outside forces.

Dear Consumerist: I recently purchased one of Mr. Bopper's machines and at first it seemed to be moving along just fine. But then I switched to a different reference frame and it suddenly stopped! Now the only thing 'perpetual' is the grudge I'm going to hold against this company's shoddy craftsmanship and false advertising.


Dear Consumerist:  As the manufacturer of the patented "Perpetual Inertia Machines", I feel it is important to point out that Mr. Shandor, in setting the machine in motion, voided the warranty which plainly states the one exception to the our guarantee:  Outside forces.  Clearly, since Mr. Shandor is not internal to the machine itself, his manipulation of it voided the warranty.  Had he merely observed it instead of interacting with it, we would be more inclined to take his claim seriously, however since the plain meaning our our short, one sentence warranty is simple enough for a junior high science student to understand, we are forced to deny his claim under this warranty.
 
2013-02-06 03:50:13 PM  

Ivo Shandor: dittybopper: Meh. I invented the perpetual inertia machine. I personally guarantee each and every one to stay at rest when placed at rest, and likewise guaranteed to stay in motion once set in motion*.

*Warranty only applies if machine is not acted upon by outside forces.

Dear Consumerist: I recently purchased one of Mr. Bopper's machines and at first it seemed to be moving along just fine. But then I switched to a different reference frame and it suddenly stopped! Now the only thing 'perpetual' is the grudge I'm going to hold against this company's shoddy craftsmanship and false advertising.



Sounds like you allowed or caused an outside force to act upon it. But since we can spin this for our own purposes: we at The Consumerist view this as an outrage!
 
2013-02-06 03:51:22 PM  
It's driving me nuts...what the hell is the name of the song playing in the background. I know it, but can't recall from where.
 
2013-02-06 03:55:52 PM  

dittybopper: Ivo Shandor: dittybopper: Meh. I invented the perpetual inertia machine. I personally guarantee each and every one to stay at rest when placed at rest, and likewise guaranteed to stay in motion once set in motion*.

*Warranty only applies if machine is not acted upon by outside forces.

Dear Consumerist: I recently purchased one of Mr. Bopper's machines and at first it seemed to be moving along just fine. But then I switched to a different reference frame and it suddenly stopped! Now the only thing 'perpetual' is the grudge I'm going to hold against this company's shoddy craftsmanship and false advertising.

Dear Consumerist:  As the manufacturer of the patented "Perpetual Inertia Machines", I feel it is important to point out that Mr. Shandor, in setting the machine in motion, voided the warranty which plainly states the one exception to the our guarantee:  Outside forces.  Clearly, since Mr. Shandor is not internal to the machine itself, his manipulation of it voided the warranty.  Had he merely observed it instead of interacting with it, we would be more inclined to take his claim seriously, however since the plain meaning our our short, one sentence warranty is simple enough for a junior high science student to understand, we are forced to deny his claim under this warranty.


My client Mr.  Ivor Shandor was not the one who voided the warranty. In shipping the device Dittybopper Corp allowed outside forces to act upon it. This clearly a case of defective goods and we will be filing a class action suit to bring justice and closure to the matter on behalf of all customers of   Dittybopper Corp*.

*Legal fees will be deducted from the total settlement prior to distribution to clients
 
2013-02-06 04:00:56 PM  

Feral_and_Preposterous: Sounds like you allowed or caused an outside force to act upon it.


No, I merely changed the perspective from which I chose to observe it. This naturally required applying a force to myself so that I could move to a different reference frame, but the machine was never affected.
 
2013-02-06 04:04:36 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Feral_and_Preposterous: Sounds like you allowed or caused an outside force to act upon it.

No, I merely changed the perspective from which I chose to observe it. This naturally required applying a force to myself so that I could move to a different reference frame, but the machine was never affected.


Except that because there are no privileged frames of reference, applying a force to yourself is identical to applying a force to the machine, and in fact indistinguishable for the purposes of the warranty.
 
2013-02-06 04:07:46 PM  

timujin: It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while.  If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.


Hmmmm, you "work for a company that puts robots on other planets" and you seriously entertained the thought that some useful energy could be extracted from that thing (before the hoax revelation, of course)?  I hope you aren't directly responsible for applying physics at work ;)
 
2013-02-06 04:17:42 PM  

RatOmeter: I hope you aren't directly responsible for applying physics at work ;)


He's not in the military.
 
2013-02-06 04:23:48 PM  
Heh. I love perpetual motion machines. Some of the patents for them (and zero point energy extraction machines, and warp travel engines, and other impossibilities) are hilariously awesome.
 
2013-02-06 04:36:24 PM  
Please go back to high school physics class, you obviously skipped the day they taught the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

You probably don't know who you are though.
 
2013-02-06 04:39:08 PM  

Theaetetus: Heh. I love perpetual motion machines. Some of the patents for them (and zero point energy extraction machines, and warp travel engines, and other impossibilities) are hilariously awesome.


I assume you mean "denied patent applications" :)
 
2013-02-06 04:39:59 PM  
Pretty certain I've seen "perpetual" motion machines that run on magnets at Spencer's before.

I was thinking it was just something like that, but then the hoax pictures above.  Alas.  It looked cool though!
 
2013-02-06 04:40:21 PM  

dennysgod: It's driving me nuts...what the hell is the name of the song playing in the background. I know it, but can't recall from where.


Jean Michele Jarre. Oxegene Part IV.
 
2013-02-06 04:42:58 PM  

dennysgod: It's driving me nuts...what the hell is the name of the song playing in the background. I know it, but can't recall from where.


The song is  Oxygene (Part IV)by Jean Michel Jarre.  You might be familiar with it from the soundtrack to the movie Gallipoli.
 
2013-02-06 04:43:40 PM  

Ed Grubermann: dennysgod: It's driving me nuts...what the hell is the name of the song playing in the background. I know it, but can't recall from where.

Jean Michele Jarre. Oxegene Part IV.


Damn these slow hands.
 
2013-02-06 04:47:40 PM  
Can't I go one day without being reminded that the sun will eventually burn out?
 
2013-02-06 04:49:26 PM  

RatOmeter: Theaetetus: Heh. I love perpetual motion machines. Some of the patents for them (and zero point energy extraction machines, and warp travel engines, and other impossibilities) are hilariously awesome.

I assume you mean "denied patent applications" :)


Nope. Patents. The trick is that you don't actually claim the perpetual motion part, you claim the buildable, working part that does something a lot less interesting.
It's actually a nice litmus test for people who read claims vs. just reading the abstracts.
 
2013-02-06 04:51:58 PM  
What exactly was that hoax trying to fake? The directions of magnetization between the discs on the wheel and the bouncing bar are orthogonal; I do not care to think about it further, but at first glance I do not understand how the forces are driving the change in angular momentum.
 
2013-02-06 04:52:56 PM  
the music and style make it look like some british industrial film from the 1970s.
 
2013-02-06 05:13:06 PM  
I remember seeing almost the same device several years ago.  The only difference is the cam on the end that raises the bar magnet once every look (mimics the motion the tester was doing manually earlier in the film)  Without that cam, the device has the tendency to eventually get stuck at the switchover.  Run a search on You tube and you should find a bunch of different videos over the last several years that show models that look about the same as the linked video.

/Nice troll with the hoax photo.
 
2013-02-06 05:19:04 PM  

rufus-t-firefly: Since he used "awesome" twice, subby must really like "awesome."



img.gawkerassets.com

F*cking Awesome!
 
2013-02-06 05:31:29 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2013-02-06 06:10:18 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Feral_and_Preposterous: Sounds like you allowed or caused an outside force to act upon it.

No, I merely changed the perspective from which I chose to observe it. This naturally required applying a force to myself so that I could move to a different reference frame, but the machine was never affected.


Schrodinger's cat frowns upon your shenanigans.

wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net

 
2013-02-06 06:24:35 PM  
It's rather hard to decide who are trolls and who actually believe in this thing.

Magnets and gravity work in both directions. Especially with some sound editing an air nozzle would work really well at keeping that turd going.
 
2013-02-06 06:28:02 PM  

Tigger: Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion: Tigger: timujin: It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while.  If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.

Guess what happens when you rig it up to a generator.

Explosion? I'm not an expert.

It will stop because of the resistance introduced by the generator.


Yep. If you've ever done anything with wind-powered generators, one of the first things they tell you is NEVER to allow the blades to spin unless the generator is hooked up to it. If you do, the blades will spin too fast, and that can be dangerous. The generator itself creates enough resistance to slow the blades down to a safe level, even as the windmill generates power. The same thing would happen here: a generator would slow down the rotation, probably enough to stop the machine completely.

The laws of thermodynamics don't actually render perpetual motion truly impossible. What's impossible is extracting energy from such a device. In practical terms, this means that if a perpetual motion machine exists, then it cannot produce any heat, light, electrical current, or even sound. If it does, then energy must be "leaking" out of the system to produce those things, and so the machine will eventually run out of energy and stop. You could add energy to the system in some way to keep it going, but then it wouldn't be a perpetual motion machine.
 
2013-02-06 06:38:12 PM  

Lumpmoose: It would have take into account the cost of rare-earth metals and how often the magnets have to be replaced.  Prices have fallen recently but by definition, mineral-based energy is not renewable.


OK, I won't go into why motors that use only peramanent magnets can't do any work, but what do you think happens to magnets when they lose their magnetism?  They don't evaporate.  The rare earth elements are still there.  They can be re-magnetized.  Yes, that does take energy, but my point is that the rare metals can be reused indefinitely.
 
2013-02-06 06:50:42 PM  

Necronic: many times more efficient than a simple flywheel


Many times more efficient at what, exactly?
 
2013-02-06 07:03:37 PM  

profplump: Necronic: many times more efficient than a simple flywheel

Many times more efficient at what, exactly?


Flying or wheeling, obviously.
 
2013-02-06 07:10:32 PM  
what if you tape a piece of buttered toast onto the back of a cat?

if only the stupidity of farkers produced energy

UNLIMITED POWARR!!!!!!
 
2013-02-06 07:13:17 PM  
People that think the only thing keeping things like this from working are the magnets wearing out really need to get their head checked.

If I were to create a device where an object rolled down a hill, then a mechanism at the end pushed the object back to the top, would you believe that this device would keep running forever?  Of course not, it's obvious that to push the object back to the top the system needs some kind of external force applied, even if we're clever and only have to worry about overcoming frictional losses.

Why, then, are people so inclined to believe that magnetic force behaves any differently from gravitational force?  After all, all this device does is create a "hill" of magnetism.  The rotor is driven by the magnets to a position where it has the lowest amount of potential energy, and then the lifter pushes the bar magnet away ever so slightly while the rotor turns back to the starting position with the highest potential energy.  Do you believe that lift takes less energy than was used to spin the rotor in the first place?  Why?  Are you functionally retarded?

So yeah, obvious hoax is obvious.  I had seen this before and wasn't clear on the how, I assumed a small motor hidden in the side supports.  The air nozzle though, that's brilliant.
 
2013-02-06 07:15:11 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

Drinking bird frowns at his magnets.
 
2013-02-06 07:15:25 PM  
A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.
 
2013-02-06 07:53:43 PM  

RatOmeter: timujin: It may not be "perpetual", but it looks like it'll run for quite a while. If you can use it to generate power, which seems pretty straightforward, it'll be a hell of a cheap source.

Hmmmm, you "work for a company that puts robots on other planets" and you seriously entertained the thought that some useful energy could be extracted from that thing (before the hoax revelation, of course)? I hope you aren't directly responsible for applying physics at work ;)


Yes I do,. No, not "seriously", had I been serious I would have taken the time to find out of it was real or a hoax,. And, no, I'm not, thankfully.  It's never been something I've ever studied, a giant hole in my education really.

So, due to that, I'm still not sure why (if, in reality, you could make something spin for any real length of time using magnets) it would be any more difficult to have it spin a generator than it is to do so with a wind or watermill as long as the force created by the magnets was greater than the opposing force created by the generator.

/I mean, technically, you could hook this up to a tiny generator (DC motor) and "create" power, since it's really just a very, very inefficient windmill.
 
2013-02-06 08:05:06 PM  

dennysgod: It's driving me nuts...what the hell is the name of the song playing in the background. I know it, but can't recall from where.


If you've ever been to Cedar Point, one of the arcades there blares it as loud as they can all day.
 
2013-02-06 08:53:04 PM  

timujin: I mean, technically, you could hook this up to a tiny generator (DC motor) and "create" power, since it's really just a very, very inefficient windmill.


Are you forgetting the "this is a hoax" part?

But, for all those PM machines that do actually run for a long time, you will find that the time that the time they run is inversely proportional to the amount of work you get out of them. Rendering them useless for power generation.
 
2013-02-06 08:59:27 PM  

dennysgod: It's driving me nuts...what the hell is the name of the song playing in the background. I know it, but can't recall from where.


It is also on one of the stations in GTA IV. Journeyis the name of the channel.
 
2013-02-06 09:33:55 PM  

Ed Grubermann: dennysgod: It's driving me nuts...what the hell is the name of the song playing in the background. I know it, but can't recall from where.

Jean Michele Jarre. Oxegene Part IV.


FloydA: dennysgod: It's driving me nuts...what the hell is the name of the song playing in the background. I know it, but can't recall from where.

The song is  Oxygene (Part IV)by Jean Michel Jarre.  You might be familiar with it from the soundtrack to the movie Gallipoli.



Thanks guys.
 
2013-02-06 10:06:07 PM  
As usual, gawker-site doesn't work even after allowing all 80 trillion different scripts running on the page.
 
2013-02-06 10:20:37 PM  

timujin: RatOmeter: timujin:


Admitting: as a kid I was snared by the "power of magnets."  I tried all sorts of things, within my limited resources, to break through the mystery of magnetics.  Then I got older, was taught a little, read a lot, then mostly understood.

Recently my own son has been berating me about "why do you think magnets can't work [such and such way]?"  I try to tell him in terms of the Laws, but I guess I haven't devised and given proper demonstrations yet.  And he hasn't finished 6th grade.

No worries... he appears to be more interested in Minecrap now.
 
2013-02-06 10:28:50 PM  
Here is a direct Youtube link to the video if like me you can't see it on Gizmodo's shiatty web site: Linkhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TwTPwIcSDp g
 
2013-02-06 10:36:04 PM  

Skyfrog: Here is a direct Youtube link to the video if like me you can't see it on Gizmodo's shiatty web site: Linkhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TwTPwIcSDp g


Thanks, very interesting.
 
2013-02-06 10:47:53 PM  
Speaking of interesting machines (so this isn't a total threadjack), but does anybody have a link to that video of the engineer who rigged up this swinging-bar contraption that would balance itself along a moving track? I think it was posted on Fark within that past couple years. He does it with a rigid bar connected to a motor on a horizontal track. Initially the bar is hanging below the track and whatever sensors he's hooked up allow the motor to swing the bar back and forth until it's upright. He then does it with a bar that has a swiveling joint in the middle, so the machine has to make significantly more movements to get it upright. I remember posting in the thread, but I can't seem to find it. THANK YOU.
 
2013-02-06 10:51:17 PM  

natazha: Please go back to high school physics class, you obviously skipped the day they taught the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

You probably don't know who you are though.




At best, a clock.
 
2013-02-06 11:10:54 PM  
Frozboz

Hoax:

And we're done.
 
2013-02-06 11:16:56 PM  
There are several people on Fark who run their mouths with no signs of ever slowing down.

If we could harness that energy, the hot air alone could generate enough power to light up Las Vegas.
 
2013-02-07 12:09:03 AM  
Magnetic fields do no work. I'll show you the math if you want. It's really easy. Hoax.
 
2013-02-07 01:04:46 AM  

xelnia: Speaking of interesting machines (so this isn't a total threadjack), but does anybody have a link to that video of the engineer who rigged up this swinging-bar contraption that would balance itself along a moving track? I think it was posted on Fark within that past couple years. He does it with a rigid bar connected to a motor on a horizontal track. Initially the bar is hanging below the track and whatever sensors he's hooked up allow the motor to swing the bar back and forth until it's upright. He then does it with a bar that has a swiveling joint in the middle, so the machine has to make significantly more movements to get it upright. I remember posting in the thread, but I can't seem to find it. THANK YOU.


Not sure if this is the video you were looking for, but what your describing sounds like a double or triple inverted pendulum.

Example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyN-CRNrb3E
 
2013-02-07 01:09:49 AM  

CrissX: xelnia: Speaking of interesting machines (so this isn't a total threadjack), but does anybody have a link to that video of the engineer who rigged up this swinging-bar contraption that would balance itself along a moving track? I think it was posted on Fark within that past couple years. He does it with a rigid bar connected to a motor on a horizontal track. Initially the bar is hanging below the track and whatever sensors he's hooked up allow the motor to swing the bar back and forth until it's upright. He then does it with a bar that has a swiveling joint in the middle, so the machine has to make significantly more movements to get it upright. I remember posting in the thread, but I can't seem to find it. THANK YOU.

Not sure if this is the video you were looking for, but what your describing sounds like a double or triple inverted pendulum.

Example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyN-CRNrb3E


That's the exact same concept, just a different video. Thanks!
 
2013-02-07 01:15:57 AM  

xelnia: CrissX: xelnia: Speaking of interesting machines (so this isn't a total threadjack), but does anybody have a link to that video of the engineer who rigged up this swinging-bar contraption that would balance itself along a moving track? I think it was posted on Fark within that past couple years. He does it with a rigid bar connected to a motor on a horizontal track. Initially the bar is hanging below the track and whatever sensors he's hooked up allow the motor to swing the bar back and forth until it's upright. He then does it with a bar that has a swiveling joint in the middle, so the machine has to make significantly more movements to get it upright. I remember posting in the thread, but I can't seem to find it. THANK YOU.

Not sure if this is the video you were looking for, but what your describing sounds like a double or triple inverted pendulum.

Example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyN-CRNrb3E

That's the exact same concept, just a different video. Thanks!


That was pretty awesome, thanks guys.
 
2013-02-07 01:23:31 AM  

CrissX: xelnia: Speaking of interesting machines (so this isn't a total threadjack), but does anybody have a link to that video of the engineer who rigged up this swinging-bar contraption that would balance itself along a moving track? I think it was posted on Fark within that past couple years. He does it with a rigid bar connected to a motor on a horizontal track. Initially the bar is hanging below the track and whatever sensors he's hooked up allow the motor to swing the bar back and forth until it's upright. He then does it with a bar that has a swiveling joint in the middle, so the machine has to make significantly more movements to get it upright. I remember posting in the thread, but I can't seem to find it. THANK YOU.

Not sure if this is the video you were looking for, but what your describing sounds like a double or triple inverted pendulum.

Example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyN-CRNrb3E


gahhhhh horrible flashbacks to my controls class..... never did get a single pendulum somewhat stable let alone 3.

/fun and interesting classes but my mind does not work that way.
 
2013-02-07 02:45:26 AM  

emotion_lotion: rufus-t-firefly: Since he used "awesome" twice, subby must really like "awesome."

[24.media.tumblr.com image 500x282]

Holly cow, when was C.K. on fox?


He wasn't.. it's from a scripted interview scene that was in an episode from his tv show.
 
2013-02-07 03:56:24 AM  
My best friend is a perpetual looking for for a wife machine.  But that was covered already in Newton's banned section of thermodynamics.
 
2013-02-07 03:56:24 AM  

Rezurok: People that think the only thing keeping things like this from working are the magnets wearing out really need to get their head checked.

If I were to create a device where an object rolled down a hill, then a mechanism at the end pushed the object back to the top, would you believe that this device would keep running forever?  Of course not, it's obvious that to push the object back to the top the system needs some kind of external force applied, even if we're clever and only have to worry about overcoming frictional losses.

Why, then, are people so inclined to believe that magnetic force behaves any differently from gravitational force?  After all, all this device does is create a "hill" of magnetism.  The rotor is driven by the magnets to a position where it has the lowest amount of potential energy, and then the lifter pushes the bar magnet away ever so slightly while the rotor turns back to the starting position with the highest potential energy.  Do you believe that lift takes less energy than was used to spin the rotor in the first place?  Why?  Are you functionally retarded?

So yeah, obvious hoax is obvious.  I had seen this before and wasn't clear on the how, I assumed a small motor hidden in the side supports.  The air nozzle though, that's brilliant.


I was thinking it was some combination of springs, elastic bands, and counterweights.
 
2013-02-07 04:15:51 AM  
Anyone guess a woman's mouth yet? My guess is a woman's mouth.

/i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2013-02-07 05:57:53 AM  

nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.


Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.
 
2013-02-07 05:58:59 AM  

nmemkha: Anyone guess a woman's mouth yet? My guess is a woman's mouth.

/[i0.kym-cdn.com image 140x130]


You think of women as machines to give blowjobs?
 
2013-02-07 06:01:58 AM  

DrGunsforHands: Rezurok: People that think the only thing keeping things like this from working are the magnets wearing out really need to get their head checked.

If I were to create a device where an object rolled down a hill, then a mechanism at the end pushed the object back to the top, would you believe that this device would keep running forever?  Of course not, it's obvious that to push the object back to the top the system needs some kind of external force applied, even if we're clever and only have to worry about overcoming frictional losses.

Why, then, are people so inclined to believe that magnetic force behaves any differently from gravitational force?  After all, all this device does is create a "hill" of magnetism.  The rotor is driven by the magnets to a position where it has the lowest amount of potential energy, and then the lifter pushes the bar magnet away ever so slightly while the rotor turns back to the starting position with the highest potential energy.  Do you believe that lift takes less energy than was used to spin the rotor in the first place?  Why?  Are you functionally retarded?

So yeah, obvious hoax is obvious.  I had seen this before and wasn't clear on the how, I assumed a small motor hidden in the side supports.  The air nozzle though, that's brilliant.

I was thinking it was some combination of springs, elastic bands, and counterweights.


I was thinking it was something like maxwells demon. (except magnetic)
 
2013-02-07 07:19:04 AM  
Perpetual motion?  This must be the a**hole causing global warming.  Someone tell him to stop dumping infinite amounts of waste heat into the universe.
 
2013-02-07 07:23:08 AM  
www.lghs.net
 
2013-02-07 08:40:39 AM  

dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.


Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".
 
2013-02-07 08:49:15 AM  
You know how if you put the batteries in a toy car backwards, it drives forward in reverse?
Try putting the batteries in a flashlight backwards.
Instant black hole!
 
2013-02-07 09:42:51 AM  

FlashHarry: the music and style make it look like some british industrial film from the 1970s.


I think that was Tangerine Dream.
 
2013-02-07 09:43:22 AM  

nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".


Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)
 
2013-02-07 09:51:51 AM  

karmachameleon: nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".

Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)




No it isn't.

More like, it's closest to being the best slice of pizza.
 
2013-02-07 09:58:00 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: karmachameleon: nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".

Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)

No it isn't.

More like, it's closest to being the best slice of pizza.


per·pet·u·al /pərˈpeCHooəl/ Adjective - Never ending or changing.

There is no grey area here.
 
2013-02-07 09:58:48 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: More like, it's closest to being the best slice of pizza.


Actually, yeah, I get what you mean.
 
2013-02-07 10:04:10 AM  

karmachameleon: StoPPeRmobile: More like, it's closest to being the best slice of pizza.

Actually, yeah, I get what you mean.




Our language limits our thinking.
 
2013-02-07 10:25:50 AM  

karmachameleon: nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".

Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)


You could conceive of a device with a power life span greater than the remaining life of the universe.
 
2013-02-07 10:34:51 AM  

stonicus: karmachameleon: nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".

Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)

You could conceive of a device with a power life span greater than the remaining life of the universe.




Some people call that a god, knucklehead.
 
2013-02-07 10:47:06 AM  

stonicus: karmachameleon: nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".

Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)

You could conceive of a device with a power life span greater than the remaining life of the universe.


Which still isn't perpetual.
 
2013-02-07 11:00:57 AM  

karmachameleon: stonicus: karmachameleon: nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".

Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)

You could conceive of a device with a power life span greater than the remaining life of the universe.

Which still isn't perpetual.


Pedantic much? I bet you're a riot at parties.

How about you stop looking down you smug nose at being "technically correct" and actually contribute to the discussion?
 
2013-02-07 11:28:26 AM  

stonicus: karmachameleon: nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".

Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)

You could conceive of a device with a power life span greater than the remaining life of the universe.


I could imagine  hundred otters in a small aero-plane.
 
2013-02-07 01:21:38 PM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: stonicus: karmachameleon: nmemkha: dready zim: nmemkha: A spinning black hole is probably the closest thing to perpetual motion I can think of.

Nope. They evaporate. If you know the mass you can estimate how long it will take as well.

Really? Amazing. That is why I said "the closest thing".

Why is that probably the closest thing?  Why not, say, a galaxy, which probably spins on average a lot longer than a black hole?

(Hint:  there is no such thing as "close to" perpetual.  It's the same as saying someone is a little bit pregnant.  It's either perpetual or it isn't.)

You could conceive of a device with a power life span greater than the remaining life of the universe.

I could imagine  hundred otters in a small aero-plane.


Otters prefer helicopters.  Don't be stupid!
 
2013-02-07 01:28:08 PM  
The complicated futility of ignorance.

/shouldn't be obscure
 
2013-02-07 01:35:56 PM  
Even if someone could invent a perpetual motion machine what good would it be? It wouldn't be able to do any extra, actual work. It would just be a worthless novelty item sold at Spencer Gifts.
 
2013-02-07 05:42:23 PM  
"the magnets will lose its magnetism after a few years. "

I need to point out that the eventual wearing out of mechanical parts in no way prevents anything from qualifying as a perpetual motion machine. Because it's about energy, not materials.
 
2013-02-07 09:19:58 PM  

nmemkha: How about you stop looking down you smug nose at being "technically correct" and actually contribute to the discussion?


Don't be sore that you were wrong, and don't take it out on me that I'm right.  It's ok to be wrong, it's how we learn.

blog.torgodevil.com
 
2013-02-08 09:42:31 AM  

Rich Cream: "the magnets will lose its magnetism after a few years. "

I need to point out that the eventual wearing out of mechanical parts in no way prevents anything from qualifying as a perpetual motion machine. Because it's about energy, not materials.


But by that definition, a car is a perpetual motion machine... it, like the magnets, just runs out of fuel after a while.
 
2013-02-08 09:47:57 AM  

stonicus: Rich Cream: "the magnets will lose its magnetism after a few years. "

I need to point out that the eventual wearing out of mechanical parts in no way prevents anything from qualifying as a perpetual motion machine. Because it's about energy, not materials.

But by that definition, a car is a perpetual motion machine... it, like the magnets, just runs out of fuel after a while.


You confusing the engine with the car.
 
2013-02-08 09:57:02 AM  

Rich Cream: "the magnets will lose its magnetism after a few years. "

I need to point out that the eventual wearing out of mechanical parts in no way prevents anything from qualifying as a perpetual motion machine. Because it's about energy, not materials.


I does if you are 'consuming' those parts to add energy to the system as is the case here.
 
2013-02-08 09:58:57 AM  

stonicus: Rich Cream: "the magnets will lose its magnetism after a few years. "

I need to point out that the eventual wearing out of mechanical parts in no way prevents anything from qualifying as a perpetual motion machine. Because it's about energy, not materials.

But by that definition, a car is a perpetual motion machine... it, like the magnets, just runs out of fuel after a while.



The magnets are the fuel and if the fuel runs out, then point taken.
 
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