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(BBC)   Drink up, everybody: after figuring out how to use a 3D printer to create clusters of stem cells, scientists are now one step away from printing out new livers for us   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 59
    More: Spiffy, stem cells, pluripotent stem cells, business development manager, Edinburgh, ESC, artificial organs, artificial cell, embryonic stem cells  
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1922 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Feb 2013 at 3:19 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-05 02:03:56 PM  
Did you know 3D printers can also be used to print a fully automatic AR-15 receiver?

/was gonna get mentioned, figured I'd get it out of the way
 
2013-02-05 02:22:43 PM  
F*CK YEAH!
 
2013-02-05 02:31:36 PM  
This breakthrough is relevant to my interests.
 
2013-02-05 02:41:34 PM  
I'd like to print a few beers right now
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-02-05 03:02:00 PM  
I knew those things would be good for something someday.

(3d printers, not livers)
 
2013-02-05 03:27:23 PM  
But will this be cheaper than good old-fashioned black-market harvesting?
 
2013-02-05 03:28:10 PM  
Figure out how to make us new lungs, damnit.

I want to start smoking again.
 
2013-02-05 03:28:49 PM  
So 3D printing.... that allows for the creation of potentially life extending creations.

... The only way this could be better would be if they were best made in space.
 
2013-02-05 03:35:28 PM  
How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?
 
2013-02-05 03:35:49 PM  
Wake me up when we can do this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-3AMq8XGaA
 
2013-02-05 03:36:05 PM  
Good news, son. They can grow livers in petri dishes now, so I won't be needing yours.
 
2013-02-05 03:37:22 PM  

B.L.Z. Bub: How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?


DUDE...
 
2013-02-05 03:37:53 PM  
"Us." That's so cute.

No, scientists are one step away from printing out organs for the rich. Not for "us." We'll have to make do, for the decades to come, with what can be obtained through donation. Not until the process becomes so inexpensive that it becomes cheaper to print new organs than to preserve donated organs will this apply to "us."

By the time this is relevant to "us", we'll be fighting over what few resources are left on this planet, watched as a form of entertainment by those in established off-world colonies.
 
2013-02-05 03:39:07 PM  
Nice!
 
2013-02-05 03:40:32 PM  

MetaCarpal: But will this be cheaper than good old-fashioned black-market harvesting?


Not if these guys want to keep their jobs...

i277.photobucket.com

/to be fair he did take out one of those silly cards.
 
2013-02-05 03:47:09 PM  
So what they're saying is that eventually they'll be able to use 3D printers to print and replace failing organs thus extending our lifespan? QA's head is gonna explode.
 
2013-02-05 03:49:19 PM  
OB. This thread delivers.
 
2013-02-05 03:53:11 PM  

FormlessOne: No, scientists are one step away from printing out organs for the rich. Not for "us." We'll have to make do, for the decades to come, with what can be obtained through donation. Not until the process becomes so inexpensive that it becomes cheaper to print new organs than to preserve donated organs will this apply to "us."


No, most scientists generally work because they feel it will benefit humanity or they just enjoy the challenge.
 
2013-02-05 03:53:34 PM  

B.L.Z. Bub: How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?


How long until we get 3D printers that print 4D printers?
 
2013-02-05 04:01:32 PM  

Felgraf: FormlessOne: No, scientists are one step away from printing out organs for the rich. Not for "us." We'll have to make do, for the decades to come, with what can be obtained through donation. Not until the process becomes so inexpensive that it becomes cheaper to print new organs than to preserve donated organs will this apply to "us."

No, most scientists generally work because they feel it will benefit humanity or they just enjoy the challenge.


While you're right about the scientists, it's the medical companies that will charge an arm and a leg for the service once the ability to print organs is fully realized. I'm sure it will need specialized printers and material plus a source for commercially available stem cells. Then the technicians to operate and maintain the equipment and so forth and so on. All of that adds to big bucks. The service won't start out cheap that's for sure.
 
2013-02-05 04:09:02 PM  

rickycal78: While you're right about the scientists, it's the medical companies that will charge an arm and a leg for the service once the ability to print organs is fully realized. I'm sure it will need specialized printers and material plus a source for commercially available stem cells. Then the technicians to operate and maintain the equipment and so forth and so on. All of that adds to big bucks. The service won't start out cheap that's for sure.


Well, yes, but what I'm saying is it's not exactly the scientist's fault. And that whole "Only for the rich thing" isn't necessarily true in other countries, either.
 
2013-02-05 04:12:29 PM  

rickycal78: a source for commercially available stem cells.


I'm pretty sure they'll have to process your own cells into stem cells first.

So it will be extract cells, induce into stem cells, culture, print, grow, transplant.

But you're right, it will probably be vastly expensive at first.
 
2013-02-05 04:20:55 PM  
This is highly amusing, because it seems as if 3D printers might be a key technology to help us live longer, healthier lives.
 
2013-02-05 04:56:17 PM  

PirateKing: rickycal78: a source for commercially available stem cells.

I'm pretty sure they'll have to process your own cells into stem cells first.

So it will be extract cells, induce into stem cells, culture, print, grow, transplant.

But you're right, it will probably be vastly expensive at first.


Why? The technology and process isn't any different than any other 3D printing once the model data is entered. I would think, commercially, keeping the retail cost low would blow all other methods of organ transplant and collection out of the water and could potentially create a massive market at five hundred bucks an organ. Especially cosmetically. Do you know how many people would be repurchasing bio-implants on a regular basis every decade? The market for wholesale organs has every incentive to keep the price range affordable for middle income families.
 
2013-02-05 04:56:56 PM  
Dear Lord, a life extending technology that uses 3d printers.   QA just felt a disturbance in the force, as if a million voices called out "HA!" at once.

Only thing that could make it better if it was revealed that the theory behind it was a result of a space based experiment.
 
2013-02-05 05:00:37 PM  

FormlessOne: "Us." That's so cute.

No, scientists are one step away from printing out organs for the rich. Not for "us." We'll have to make do, for the decades to come, with what can be obtained through donation. Not until the process becomes so inexpensive that it becomes cheaper to print new organs than to preserve donated organs will this apply to "us."

By the time this is relevant to "us", we'll be fighting over what few resources are left on this planet, watched as a form of entertainment by those in established off-world colonies.


GE capital would like to finance your organ for only 20% apr.

/and then Rep Men becomes reality
 
2013-02-05 05:01:46 PM  

blahpers: B.L.Z. Bub: How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?

How long until we get 3D printers that print 4D printers?


If that was going to happen, wouldn't it have happened already?
 
2013-02-05 05:07:37 PM  

PapaChester: Why? The technology and process isn't any different than any other 3D printing once the model data is entered.


The patent, of course. They only have to be  slightly cheaper and  slightly more reliable than organ donation. Which is easy, when you can produce an organ on demand.
 
2013-02-05 05:18:19 PM  

FloydA: blahpers: B.L.Z. Bub: How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?

How long until we get 3D printers that print 4D printers?

If that was going to happen, wouldn't it have happened already?


No because there are still issues with printing the electronics -- the full self-replication is still a goal (although you can print all the non-electronic parts).  Also, what you get is a pile of parts -- somebody still has to put it together and debug.

Personally, I look at the reliability of our office copier...
 
2013-02-05 05:18:35 PM  
Goddamnit guys, couldn't we have just bashed religion and spared that douche the satisfaction of a successful troll?
 
2013-02-05 05:18:42 PM  
Let's see how zealots dig deep for new ways to ruin THIS too.
 
2013-02-05 05:29:25 PM  

OhioKnight: FloydA: blahpers: B.L.Z. Bub: How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?

How long until we get 3D printers that print 4D printers?

If that was going to happen, wouldn't it have happened already?

No because there are still issues with printing the electronics -- the full self-replication is still a goal (although you can print all the non-electronic parts).  Also, what you get is a pile of parts -- somebody still has to put it together and debug.

Personally, I look at the reliability of our office copier...


Oh I know it hasn't happened YET.  That's obvious.  What I mean is that if a 4-D printer will have once going to have already happened in the future that it would have to have already going to have been by now.
 
2013-02-05 05:33:45 PM  

FloydA: OhioKnight: FloydA: blahpers: B.L.Z. Bub: How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?

How long until we get 3D printers that print 4D printers?

If that was going to happen, wouldn't it have happened already?

No because there are still issues with printing the electronics -- the full self-replication is still a goal (although you can print all the non-electronic parts).  Also, what you get is a pile of parts -- somebody still has to put it together and debug.

Personally, I look at the reliability of our office copier...

Oh I know it hasn't happened YET.  That's obvious.  What I mean is that if a 4-D printer will have once going to have already happened in the future that it would have to have already going to have been by now.


[jackiechan.jpg]
 
2013-02-05 06:02:43 PM  

FloydA: blahpers: B.L.Z. Bub: How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?

How long until we get 3D printers that print 4D printers?

If that was going to happen, wouldn't it have happened already?


Time is the fourth dimension.
 
2013-02-05 06:05:36 PM  
I'll get the chianti and fava beans ready
 
2013-02-05 06:21:26 PM  
What a 3D Printer might look like:

i.imgur.com
 
2013-02-05 07:00:24 PM  

Felgraf: FormlessOne: No, scientists are one step away from printing out organs for the rich. Not for "us." We'll have to make do, for the decades to come, with what can be obtained through donation. Not until the process becomes so inexpensive that it becomes cheaper to print new organs than to preserve donated organs will this apply to "us."

No, most scientists generally work because they feel it will benefit humanity or they just enjoy the challenge.


Heh. That's so cute. Yes, it's true that many scientists have altruistic motives. They don't own the patents that result, though - it's the companies for which they work that then take their altruism-driven discoveries and monetize the holy living fark out of them. Perhaps I should've said "the employers of those scientists are one step away from printing out organs for the rich", but the sentiment is no less valid for its cynical utterance. Sure, we can argue about who's holding the leash, but we're still at the other end of it.
 
2013-02-05 07:02:06 PM  
How many did Drew order?
 
2013-02-05 08:00:39 PM  

Opus Croakus: Wake me up when we can do this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-3AMq8XGaA


or this
 
2013-02-05 08:01:59 PM  

GardenWeasel: Opus Croakus: Wake me up when we can do this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-3AMq8XGaA

or this


Argh

i.imgur.com
 
2013-02-05 08:17:55 PM  
Sometimes I need to remind myself that I'm living in the goddamed future.
 
2013-02-05 08:41:25 PM  
Let me know when I can booze as much as I want and not get fat until then stop teasing me!
 
2013-02-05 09:18:18 PM  
Making copies.... the stem cellinator, the stem man, stemmington steele, stemmmmmmmy.
 
2013-02-05 09:33:48 PM  

Felgraf: So 3D printing.... that allows for the creation of potentially life extending creations.

... The only way this could be better would be if they were best made in space.


I see what you did there with my bioenhanced eyes
 
2013-02-05 09:40:13 PM  

rickycal78: Felgraf: FormlessOne: No, scientists are one step away from printing out organs for the rich. Not for "us." We'll have to make do, for the decades to come, with what can be obtained through donation. Not until the process becomes so inexpensive that it becomes cheaper to print new organs than to preserve donated organs will this apply to "us."

No, most scientists generally work because they feel it will benefit humanity or they just enjoy the challenge.

While you're right about the scientists, it's the medical companies that will charge an arm and a leg for the service once the ability to print organs is fully realized. I'm sure it will need specialized printers and material plus a source for commercially available stem cells. Then the technicians to operate and maintain the equipment and so forth and so on. All of that adds to big bucks. The service won't start out cheap that's for sure.


There is only a market for computers for the 6 richest men in the world.
 
2013-02-05 09:41:26 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Goddamnit guys, couldn't we have just bashed religion and spared that douche the satisfaction of a successful troll?


He's not a troll anymore, he's more of a mascot of the Fark Space Brigade now.
 
2013-02-05 10:17:13 PM  

MetaCarpal: But will this be cheaper than good old-fashioned black-market harvesting?


Probably not. I mean, alcoholism takes a toll on the liver, sure, but the kidneys, heart, brain, hell even the thyroid take a huge beating. Not to mention the pancrease.  Or the high likelyhood of early onset arthritis, and other forms of inflamatory joint disease.

You can get a lot of that out of 1 corpse pretty easy.
 
2013-02-05 10:24:14 PM  

B.L.Z. Bub: How long until we get 3D printers that print other 3D printers?


Not sure if full-on snark, but we have that already.  I can't remember the name of the printer, but it can print all the parts needed to make itself (short of the media).

So you can buy the printer, print all the parts, assemble and viola..two 3D printers.

I am not sure that you could ever have a stationary printer that can print another printer that didn't require assembly.

Also if the printer breaks, it can print the broken part to fix itself.

/that last sentence should make a few people twitch when they read it.
 
2013-02-05 11:15:55 PM  
"They will charge you an arm and a leg for the organs they print"... well then, better print out the arms and legs first, amiright?
 
2013-02-06 12:02:21 AM  
As everyone knows, 3D printers will never be able to create a soul, so any true Christian would never go near these things.

Just helping the religious whack jobs out so they will die faster.
 
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