Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Sydney Morning Herald)   Australia: Our inovating ISPs were the 1st to bring you crappy monthly download limits. Let me present you with our latest idea, P2P traffic shaping   (smh.com.au) divider line 53
    More: Scary, P2P, bandwidth cap, ISP, telstra, Fairfax Media  
•       •       •

1819 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Feb 2013 at 8:31 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



53 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-02-05 01:41:04 AM  
How do they even get Internet to the island? Wifi from china?
 
2013-02-05 02:41:40 AM  
Wait... You think ISP's in the USA don't already do that?

I have a bridge to sell you.
 
2013-02-05 07:29:27 AM  
I prefer to do my throttling *after* I get my porn downloaded.
 
2013-02-05 07:41:54 AM  
Aren't most instant messaging services also P2P?
 
2013-02-05 08:19:55 AM  

Shadow Blasko: Wait... You think ISP's in the USA don't already do that?

I have a bridge to sell you.


I've never noticed any problem with my P2P download speeds.  But, it's been a while since I've bothered with that, ever since telecom companies decided to allow third-parties (various entertainment industries) to spy on P2P traffic.
 
2013-02-05 08:27:45 AM  

Cythraul: Shadow Blasko: Wait... You think ISP's in the USA don't already do that?

I have a bridge to sell you.

I've never noticed any problem with my P2P download speeds.  But, it's been a while since I've bothered with that, ever since telecom companies decided to allow third-parties (various entertainment industries) to spy on P2P traffic.


We were packet shaping back in the late 90's and early 2000's when I was at an ISP.

Mostly it is at the request of third party resellers (colleges, small offices, etc) but sniffing and throttling p2p traffic on standard ports and protocols used by the most popular software, whether it was napster, kazaa, bittornado (or whatever that was called in the early days of torrents) or just usenet binaries, if they asked, we provided solutions to clamp it down. Usually only during business hours, but we did do it for them.

Mostly it just capped usenet and high traffic ports to <20% of whatever bandwidth they were paying for.
 
2013-02-05 08:31:39 AM  

Shadow Blasko: Cythraul: Shadow Blasko: Wait... You think ISP's in the USA don't already do that?

I have a bridge to sell you.

I've never noticed any problem with my P2P download speeds.  But, it's been a while since I've bothered with that, ever since telecom companies decided to allow third-parties (various entertainment industries) to spy on P2P traffic.

We were packet shaping back in the late 90's and early 2000's when I was at an ISP.

Mostly it is at the request of third party resellers (colleges, small offices, etc) but sniffing and throttling p2p traffic on standard ports and protocols used by the most popular software, whether it was napster, kazaa, bittornado (or whatever that was called in the early days of torrents) or just usenet binaries, if they asked, we provided solutions to clamp it down. Usually only during business hours, but we did do it for them.

Mostly it just capped usenet and high traffic ports to <20% of whatever bandwidth they were paying for.


I can't really say I'm shocked that in America companies are allowed to fark over customers.
 
2013-02-05 08:39:36 AM  

Cythraul: Shadow Blasko: Cythraul: Shadow Blasko: Wait... You think ISP's in the USA don't already do that?

I have a bridge to sell you.

I've never noticed any problem with my P2P download speeds.  But, it's been a while since I've bothered with that, ever since telecom companies decided to allow third-parties (various entertainment industries) to spy on P2P traffic.

We were packet shaping back in the late 90's and early 2000's when I was at an ISP.

Mostly it is at the request of third party resellers (colleges, small offices, etc) but sniffing and throttling p2p traffic on standard ports and protocols used by the most popular software, whether it was napster, kazaa, bittornado (or whatever that was called in the early days of torrents) or just usenet binaries, if they asked, we provided solutions to clamp it down. Usually only during business hours, but we did do it for them.

Mostly it just capped usenet and high traffic ports to <20% of whatever bandwidth they were paying for.

I can't really say I'm shocked that in America companies are allowed to fark over customers.


Whoa there Tex... No one was screwing anyone over.

When TakeItAll Mortgage company moves into a new office and wants business class internet, but doesn't wanna waste bandwidth on P2P apps, and also doesn't want to pay big IT overhead, they have a small full-service ISP do it for them, and it works. They are getting what they pay for.

If HipsterUniversity wants a phat pipe, but wants the ISP to restrict outbound P2P, that is not screwing over the students.

At NO point have I ever knowingly participated in restricting the unfettered* internet access of ANY customer in any way that they did not specifically request.

*Ok, with the exception of a "Christian ISP" I once worked for that ran filtering at the ISP level, for its customers... and I figure not everyone wanted it, but that is what they got.
 
2013-02-05 08:44:23 AM  
BT in the UK has traffic shaped certain types of P2P traffic during evenings on their most common tariffs for at least a year, and probably several. Can't say I have ever really been that bothered by it - it is not all P2P traffic, so things like Skype are not slowed down by it.
 
2013-02-05 09:02:20 AM  

Shadow Blasko: Cythraul: Shadow Blasko: Cythraul: Shadow Blasko: Wait... You think ISP's in the USA don't already do that?

I have a bridge to sell you.

I've never noticed any problem with my P2P download speeds.  But, it's been a while since I've bothered with that, ever since telecom companies decided to allow third-parties (various entertainment industries) to spy on P2P traffic.

We were packet shaping back in the late 90's and early 2000's when I was at an ISP.

Mostly it is at the request of third party resellers (colleges, small offices, etc) but sniffing and throttling p2p traffic on standard ports and protocols used by the most popular software, whether it was napster, kazaa, bittornado (or whatever that was called in the early days of torrents) or just usenet binaries, if they asked, we provided solutions to clamp it down. Usually only during business hours, but we did do it for them.

Mostly it just capped usenet and high traffic ports to <20% of whatever bandwidth they were paying for.

I can't really say I'm shocked that in America companies are allowed to fark over customers.

Whoa there Tex... No one was screwing anyone over.

When TakeItAll Mortgage company moves into a new office and wants business class internet, but doesn't wanna waste bandwidth on P2P apps, and also doesn't want to pay big IT overhead, they have a small full-service ISP do it for them, and it works. They are getting what they pay for.

If HipsterUniversity wants a phat pipe, but wants the ISP to restrict outbound P2P, that is not screwing over the students.

At NO point have I ever knowingly participated in restricting the unfettered* internet access of ANY customer in any way that they did not specifically request.

*Ok, with the exception of a "Christian ISP" I once worked for that ran filtering at the ISP level, for its customers... and I figure not everyone wanted it, but that is what they got.


Huh?  I thought you were talking about ISPs limiting bandwidth for P2P services for private users.  Example: if Comcast or Time Warner started target throttling bandwidth for P2P for its customers at the behest of a company, like Sony, or Disney because they noticed people may have been pirating their films on a service like Pirate Bay.

Which, I feel is screwing over their customers.
 
2013-02-05 09:06:27 AM  

Cythraul: *Ok, with the exception of a "Christian ISP" I once worked for that ran filtering at the ISP level, for its customers... and I figure not everyone wanted it, but that is what they got.

Huh?  I thought you were talking about ISPs limiting bandwidth for P2P servic ...


That's not what I got from what he said at all.  More like businesses not wanting their employees eating up company bandwidth during working hours.

That Christian ISP thing has me curious though...were the customers aware it was happening, or did the owner just figure he was doing a public service?
 
2013-02-05 09:07:15 AM  

Cythraul: Huh? I thought you were talking about ISPs limiting bandwidth for P2P services for private users. Example: if Comcast or Time Warner started target throttling bandwidth for P2P for its customers at the behest of a company, like Sony, or Disney because they noticed people may have been pirating their films on a service like Pirate Bay.

Which, I feel is screwing over their customers.


Nope... Just general throttling of high bandwidth-high risk ports or protocols.

It's been going on forever.

I remember when it was a service-disconnect level offense to run a game server (simple server, not a huge hosted operation) on Unreal. Time-Warner used to scan for game servers and would straight up disconnect your ass if you had one.  Same for FTP servers.

Not so much anymore, and that is not really throttling, but "clamping down on whatever we want because we don't think that is how you should be using your bandwidth" is nothing new.
 
2013-02-05 09:08:57 AM  

SurfaceTension: Aren't most instant messaging services also P2P?


Depends on the service, but I know AIM/ICQ/GChat/IRC/Skype/Yahoo/XFire all go through a central server. Some of them support P2P connections though, like if you want to send a file to a user over AIM, it makes a direct connection to bypass the server.
 
2013-02-05 09:14:27 AM  

StrangeQ: That's not what I got from what he said at all. More like businesses not wanting their employees eating up company bandwidth during working hours.


More not wanting to pay for 2MB down, and having the secretary's streaming video from her daycare, or the kids in sales using up all the bandwidth playing games, so certain ports were restricted to x% of purchased bandwidth during business hours. You could do all the webbrowsing or emailing you wanted, but external video sites were throttled to hell and back.

It would be much harder to do it now, with flash and other video stuff being so integrated into web2.0 crap, but in the late 90's and early 00's it was a breeze.

StrangeQ: That Christian ISP thing has me curious though...were the customers aware it was happening, or did the owner just figure he was doing a public service?


They were aware. The company was bought by another Christian ISP a while ago, and I think they still exist.

GoodNews was the name of the ISP.. looks like they are gone now. I shall not weep.
 
2013-02-05 09:20:15 AM  
Nope, sorry. Rogers and Bell in Canada have been traffic shaping and packet sniffing on torrents for years and years.
 
2013-02-05 09:22:03 AM  
Noooo, my weird pornography! What am I supposed to do, go to Japan and watch them fark in person? That's inhumane. You can't skip forward to the good bits, you have to watch Captain Saliva gross you out for 15 minutes and I don't want to see that. Telstra are censoring my emissions, man. That's what this is. A plot to censor my output and drive up tourism on behalf of Big Saliva. I bet that once I'm out of the country, they'll have a spy come into my house and fart on my pillow. Right into it. So when I get home and flop into bed, thoroughly grossed out already, the Telstra guy's fart wafts up into my face. I'm onto them, man.
 
2013-02-05 09:24:20 AM  
Maybe we will see the rise of "Virtual ISPs" that offer VPN tailored to bypass such shenanigans.
 
2013-02-05 09:28:00 AM  

hervatski: How do they even get Internet to the island? Wifi from china?


We call it Chi-fi. We get our tallest guy to hold up a punch bowl covered in foil. That's why we don't have internet when it rains, because our tallest guy (Barry) is also a bit prissy about getting hit by lightning. We can't afford to lose him, so I guess it's for the best.
 
2013-02-05 09:29:21 AM  

nmemkha: Maybe we will see the rise of "Virtual ISPs" that offer VPN tailored to bypass such shenanigans.


????

VISPS have been around for years. Partners like BT, Pratel, ATT, Rogers own large bandwidths which they resell to smallers ISP'S. That model has been in place since the mid 90's. I worked for Amdocs/Solect which made most of the worlds billing software for ISP's and cell providers.
 
2013-02-05 09:35:46 AM  
Personally I find p2p throttling annoying because a lot of PC games use torrents to deliver updates, and steam delivers the whole game that way. There are many legitimate uses for p2p and it's becoming more common every day.

This weekend I downloaded Hawken, MWO, and a steam game (twice because I gave a copy of the game to my wife). I also had my Minecraft server running the whole time. These are all legitimate uses and no piracy was involved. If my ISP decided to throttle P2P I'd lose interest in doing business with them pretty quickly.
 
2013-02-05 09:40:54 AM  

indarwinsshadow: Nope, sorry. Rogers and Bell in Canada have been traffic shaping and packet sniffing on torrents for years and years.


Not 100% sure about sniffing. I can guarantee you every other ISP in Canada has been shaping traffic on P2P for years. As another said before in this thread it is all about high ultilization on some users. If you want to have your traffic no shaped by an ISP be prepared to pay for an SLA and possible something higher than your basic home package.
 
2013-02-05 09:48:20 AM  
Canadian ISP's are easing up and removing throttling now. Turns out it's more profitable to lower data caps and charge overage fees since they excess capacity is just wasted anyway. Why block someone from paying an extra $100 a month?
 
2013-02-05 09:49:35 AM  

Egoy3k: Personally I find p2p throttling annoying because a lot of PC games use torrents to deliver updates, and steam delivers the whole game that way. There are many legitimate uses for p2p and it's becoming more common every day.

This weekend I downloaded Hawken, MWO, and a steam game (twice because I gave a copy of the game to my wife). I also had my Minecraft server running the whole time. These are all legitimate uses and no piracy was involved. If my ISP decided to throttle P2P I'd lose interest in doing business with them pretty quickly.


Note that I have got 8MB/s out of Steam during the evenings, despite on another computer a uTorrent is throttled down to almost nothing, so they can be fairly selective about what they throttle. As I can leave my computer on overnight it is only a fairly minor inconvenience.
 
2013-02-05 09:51:28 AM  

Egoy3k: Personally I find p2p throttling annoying because a lot of PC games use torrents to deliver updates, and steam delivers the whole game that way. There are many legitimate uses for p2p and it's becoming more common every day.

This weekend I downloaded Hawken, MWO, and a steam game (twice because I gave a copy of the game to my wife). I also had my Minecraft server running the whole time. These are all legitimate uses and no piracy was involved. If my ISP decided to throttle P2P I'd lose interest in doing business with them pretty quickly.


But, otoh, you can download those games during non-peak periods. If throttling you means that several other customers can watch a Netflix movie with less buffering, then it's a good thing for the ISP to do. You call it throttling, I call it deep packet scanning for improved QoS.

/mind you, the  best thing would be to increase the network bandwidth, but that costs money
 
2013-02-05 09:56:38 AM  

Theaetetus: Egoy3k: Personally I find p2p throttling annoying because a lot of PC games use torrents to deliver updates, and steam delivers the whole game that way. There are many legitimate uses for p2p and it's becoming more common every day.

This weekend I downloaded Hawken, MWO, and a steam game (twice because I gave a copy of the game to my wife). I also had my Minecraft server running the whole time. These are all legitimate uses and no piracy was involved. If my ISP decided to throttle P2P I'd lose interest in doing business with them pretty quickly.

But, otoh, you can download those games during non-peak periods. If throttling you means that several other customers can watch a Netflix movie with less buffering, then it's a good thing for the ISP to do. You call it throttling, I call it deep packet scanning for improved QoS.

/mind you, the  best thing would be to increase the network bandwidth, but that costs money


No I can't download those games during non-peak periods. I pay for my bandwidth and I'll use when I damn well please.
 
2013-02-05 09:59:11 AM  

Egoy3k: Theaetetus: Egoy3k: Personally I find p2p throttling annoying because a lot of PC games use torrents to deliver updates, and steam delivers the whole game that way. There are many legitimate uses for p2p and it's becoming more common every day.

This weekend I downloaded Hawken, MWO, and a steam game (twice because I gave a copy of the game to my wife). I also had my Minecraft server running the whole time. These are all legitimate uses and no piracy was involved. If my ISP decided to throttle P2P I'd lose interest in doing business with them pretty quickly.

But, otoh, you can download those games during non-peak periods. If throttling you means that several other customers can watch a Netflix movie with less buffering, then it's a good thing for the ISP to do. You call it throttling, I call it deep packet scanning for improved QoS.

/mind you, the  best thing would be to increase the network bandwidth, but that costs money

No I can't download those games during non-peak periods.


Huh, that's odd. Steam works for me at 2 in the morning. Maybe you have a virus.

I pay for my bandwidth and I'll use when I damn well please.

Your attitude isn't going to win many friends among people who experience buffering on their streaming movies, and frankly, there are more of them than you and the ISP doesn't care about your selfish anarcho-libertarian beliefs. If you don't want to play well with others, than don't be surprised when you get shafted.
 
2013-02-05 10:09:13 AM  

Theaetetus: Egoy3k: Theaetetus: Egoy3k: Personally I find p2p throttling annoying because a lot of PC games use torrents to deliver updates, and steam delivers the whole game that way. There are many legitimate uses for p2p and it's becoming more common every day.

This weekend I downloaded Hawken, MWO, and a steam game (twice because I gave a copy of the game to my wife). I also had my Minecraft server running the whole time. These are all legitimate uses and no piracy was involved. If my ISP decided to throttle P2P I'd lose interest in doing business with them pretty quickly.

But, otoh, you can download those games during non-peak periods. If throttling you means that several other customers can watch a Netflix movie with less buffering, then it's a good thing for the ISP to do. You call it throttling, I call it deep packet scanning for improved QoS.

/mind you, the  best thing would be to increase the network bandwidth, but that costs money

No I can't download those games during non-peak periods.

Huh, that's odd. Steam works for me at 2 in the morning. Maybe you have a virus.


Yeah but I want my game now. My usage is no less legitimate than theirs. Why should I have to wait for my game so they can have their movie right away?

I pay for my bandwidth and I'll use when I damn well please.

Your attitude isn't going to win many friends among people who experience buffering on their streaming movies, and frankly, there are more of them than you and the ISP doesn't care about your selfish anarcho-libertarian beliefs. If you don't want to play well with others, than don't be surprised when you get shafted.


I have never experienced buffering on Netflix. Not once. If you do then you need a better connection. Don't tell me that your ISP's overselling bandwidth and lack of capital investment in infrastructure is somehow my fault.

I'm sorry if this seems like I'm attacking you. I'm pretty passionate about this subject. ISPs have had years to upgrade their infrastructure, instead they neglected it and claimed all the money that should have gone into infrastructure as profits. Now they want us to foot the bill for their own mistakes meanwhile they continue to post huge profits. fark em. Until they start feeling the hurt for poor management why should the consumers?
 
2013-02-05 10:10:03 AM  
Inovating?
 
2013-02-05 10:15:16 AM  
Doesn't Australia also censor internet for everybody?

If so, what a crappy place to live!
 
2013-02-05 10:23:08 AM  

doczoidberg: Doesn't Australia also censor internet for everybody?

If so, what a crappy place to live!


No, stupid.
 
2013-02-05 10:34:12 AM  
...And isn't illegal to look at naked pics of a flat chested woman over there, too?
 
2013-02-05 10:34:35 AM  

Egoy3k: I have never experienced buffering on Netflix. Not once. If you do then you need a better connection. Don't tell me that your ISP's overselling bandwidth and lack of capital investment in infrastructure is somehow my fault.


I'm sorry if this seems like I'm attacking you. I'm pretty passionate about this subject. ISPs have had years to upgrade their infrastructure, instead they neglected it and claimed all the money that should have gone into infrastructure as profits. Now they want us to foot the bill for their own mistakes meanwhile they continue to post huge profits. fark em. Until they start feeling the hurt for poor management why should the consumers?

Note that above, I said it would be preferable if ISPs would increase their network capacities. But lacking that, your complaint that you  have to download games during peak hours and can't possibly set them up to download overnight while you're sleeping is going to fall on deaf ears.
 
2013-02-05 10:42:13 AM  
ADSL

Bwahahahahahahahaha, did we go back to 1990?
 
2013-02-05 10:51:00 AM  

Theaetetus: Egoy3k: I have never experienced buffering on Netflix. Not once. If you do then you need a better connection. Don't tell me that your ISP's overselling bandwidth and lack of capital investment in infrastructure is somehow my fault.

I'm sorry if this seems like I'm attacking you. I'm pretty passionate about this subject. ISPs have had years to upgrade their infrastructure, instead they neglected it and claimed all the money that should have gone into infrastructure as profits. Now they want us to foot the bill for their own mistakes meanwhile they continue to post huge profits. fark em. Until they start feeling the hurt for poor management why should the consumers?

Note that above, I said it would be preferable if ISPs would increase their network capacities. But lacking that, your complaint that you  have to download games during peak hours and can't possibly set them up to download overnight while you're sleeping is going to fall on deaf ears.


Why? Why is my desire for entertainment less valid than that of someone else?  I don't HAVE to download my game any time, I just happen to download them directly after I purchase them. Sometimes that's 'peak time' sometimes it's 2AM. Since I pay my ISP for bandwidth I figure it's a perfectly reasonable request that I be allowed to use it.

Notice that I'm not in this thread asking 'What gives them the right to slow down my download by watching movies at peak times anyway? The bastards.'
 
2013-02-05 10:55:49 AM  

doczoidberg: ...And isn't illegal to look at naked pics of a flat chested woman over there, too?


I repeat: No, stupid.
 
2013-02-05 10:59:37 AM  
...But those things WERE illegal at one  point, yes?


blog.husng.com
 
2013-02-05 11:02:46 AM  

Egoy3k: Theaetetus: Egoy3k: I have never experienced buffering on Netflix. Not once. If you do then you need a better connection. Don't tell me that your ISP's overselling bandwidth and lack of capital investment in infrastructure is somehow my fault.

I'm sorry if this seems like I'm attacking you. I'm pretty passionate about this subject. ISPs have had years to upgrade their infrastructure, instead they neglected it and claimed all the money that should have gone into infrastructure as profits. Now they want us to foot the bill for their own mistakes meanwhile they continue to post huge profits. fark em. Until they start feeling the hurt for poor management why should the consumers?

Note that above, I said it would be preferable if ISPs would increase their network capacities. But lacking that, your complaint that you  have to download games during peak hours and can't possibly set them up to download overnight while you're sleeping is going to fall on deaf ears.

Why? Why is my desire for entertainment less valid than that of someone else?  I don't HAVE to download my game any time, I just happen to download them directly after I purchase them. Sometimes that's 'peak time' sometimes it's 2AM. Since I pay my ISP for bandwidth I figure it's a perfectly reasonable request that I be allowed to use it.

Notice that I'm not in this thread asking 'What gives them the right to slow down my download by watching movies at peak times anyway? The bastards.'


Movies are isochronous, unlike data transfers, so they get a higher QoS priority than your download. And when you watch movies, their download is throttled so that you get a higher QoS priority. By working together, we all get the benefit of faster service  on things that require faster service. Your download is not one of them.
 
2013-02-05 11:04:43 AM  

Theaetetus: Egoy3k: Personally I find p2p throttling annoying because a lot of PC games use torrents to deliver updates, and steam delivers the whole game that way. There are many legitimate uses for p2p and it's becoming more common every day.

This weekend I downloaded Hawken, MWO, and a steam game (twice because I gave a copy of the game to my wife). I also had my Minecraft server running the whole time. These are all legitimate uses and no piracy was involved. If my ISP decided to throttle P2P I'd lose interest in doing business with them pretty quickly.

But, otoh, you can download those games during non-peak periods. If throttling you means that several other customers can watch a Netflix movie with less buffering, then it's a good thing for the ISP to do. You call it throttling, I call it deep packet scanning for improved QoS.

/mind you, the  best thing would be to increase the network bandwidth, but that costs money


And I call it not giving people what they are paying for, you can not improve someone else's service at my expense. If you do not like what is being done with the bandwidth do not sell to them. Not providing the service you sell and applying unknown and outright denied filters or shaping is wrong a few carriers in my home country were advised of this by the governing body... which they for the most part bend to their will.
 
2013-02-05 11:07:45 AM  

spentshells: you can not improve someone else's service at my expense.


Then your service can't be improved at anyone else's expense, so say goodbye to streaming video, because some spammer's mass email was in the queue first.
 
2013-02-05 11:10:20 AM  

doczoidberg: ...But those things WERE illegal at one  point, yes?


[blog.husng.com image 600x488]


I'm so angry now! I'm bouncing off the walls, here, man. Upside down, too, because that one myth was correct. And it sucks twice as hard because the walls are made of flat chested women! I'm gonna get a visit from the Australian FBI tomorrow, I just know it. The Union of Blokes Trying To Stamp Out Poofery (UBTTSOP, or Ubitsop) don't mess around. God help me if they find out that I once drank a light beer.
 
2013-02-05 11:24:30 AM  
Why? Is light beer illegal there, too???
 
2013-02-05 11:27:14 AM  

doczoidberg: Why? Is light beer illegal there, too???


No, but it's frowned upon if somebody over 12 is seen in public with it.
 
2013-02-05 11:32:05 AM  
Theaetetus:
/mind you, the  best thing would be to increase the network bandwidth, but that costs money

The best thing to do for an ISP is to team up with Google or Netflix to put in specific servers for a selected area to ease their bandwidth on their transport link. With a large enough server to fill and cache tonnes of moves and tv shows increases load times customers have.
 
2013-02-05 11:43:49 AM  

spentshells: Theaetetus: Egoy3k: Personally I find p2p throttling annoying because a lot of PC games use torrents to deliver updates, and steam delivers the whole game that way. There are many legitimate uses for p2p and it's becoming more common every day.

This weekend I downloaded Hawken, MWO, and a steam game (twice because I gave a copy of the game to my wife). I also had my Minecraft server running the whole time. These are all legitimate uses and no piracy was involved. If my ISP decided to throttle P2P I'd lose interest in doing business with them pretty quickly.

But, otoh, you can download those games during non-peak periods. If throttling you means that several other customers can watch a Netflix movie with less buffering, then it's a good thing for the ISP to do. You call it throttling, I call it deep packet scanning for improved QoS.

/mind you, the  best thing would be to increase the network bandwidth, but that costs money

And I call it not giving people what they are paying for, you can not improve someone else's service at my expense. If you do not like what is being done with the bandwidth do not sell to them. Not providing the service you sell and applying unknown and outright denied filters or shaping is wrong a few carriers in my home country were advised of this by the governing body... which they for the most part bend to their will.



You are getting what you pay for. If you read your contract they give you a bandwidth "speed" of up to  X Mbps. You are never fully guarenteed to have that speed at all times, unless you paid to get and SLA with the ISP and a static bandwidth level. Since you do not they make sure that all customers get the best service possible by shaping, aka "throttling" certain data streams that come in, eg downloads and P2P since they can clobber any pipe size. To give priority for stream whether it is VOD, cable services, telephony, video stream from the internet, etc. Also because of this they can make sure spammers and ddos and other attacks do not cripple their network causing issues with all their customers.

To complaining about ISP infrastructure and if they do not do it or not, unless you have inside information about what they did it can be a stretch a certain points. I know the ISP I work for has done a lot of recent work improving our infastructure because of the high demand from streaming and internet services that are coming we need to adapt to. Pretty much everything is running on TenGig ports (or several) to help with the load we are pushing out and we are a small National Provider in Canada.

I cannot say fully for America, but in Canada Rogers, Bell, Eastlink, Telus have been putting a lot of money (some of it too being public, which I do not agree with) into infrastructure just to meet demands that are coming now. So throttling is never fully going away it is basic QoS that needs to be done. The thing you should put your energy in and fight is about data caps, since they is entirely a quick cash grab.
 
2013-02-05 12:03:18 PM  

mr.doctor: mr.doctor: To complaining about ISP infrastructure and if they do not do it or not, unless you have inside information about what they did it can be a stretch a certain points. I know the ISP I work for has done a lot of recent work improving our infastructure because of the high demand from streaming and internet services that are coming we need to adapt to. Pretty much everything is running on TenGig ports (or several) to help with the load we are pushing out and we are a small National Provider in Canada.


Judging by your location, description of your company, and the fact that you included it in your list of providers that dwarf it I'm assuming you work for Eastlink. You guys get no complaints from me. I'm more than happy with my service and would upgrade to a faster connection if you didn't have caps in place on your new packages.
 
2013-02-05 12:53:19 PM  
If my ISP did this, I'd call them the same day and cancel. I use torrents for almost everything I possibly can. Thankfully, they haven't (yet) decided to start traffic shaping. I pay for 25 Mbps and that's what I get. Upload speeds are atrocious, but that's pretty normal for my ISP.

Screw these crusading jackasses.
 
2013-02-05 01:05:25 PM  

Diarrhea Anne Frank: doczoidberg: Why? Is light beer illegal there, too???

No, but it's frowned upon if somebody over 12 is seen in public with it.



OK. I take back every bad thing I have ever said about Australia.
 
2013-02-05 10:14:18 PM  
Just wait until some freighter weighs and drags anchor cutting their transcontinental cable. Then you'll see who really runs Bartertown!
 
2013-02-06 12:37:02 AM  

YodaBlues: SurfaceTension: Aren't most instant messaging services also P2P?

Depends on the service, but I know AIM/ICQ/GChat/IRC/Skype/Yahoo/XFire all go through a central server. Some of them support P2P connections though, like if you want to send a file to a user over AIM, it makes a direct connection to bypass the server.


Yeah.  When my ISP started messing with torrent traffic it also messed with voice chat in an MMO I play.  They flatly deny that they're doing any filtering, though, so there's no way to get them to understand their filter is too broad.
 
2013-02-06 11:54:05 AM  

Diarrhea Anne Frank: Noooo, my weird pornography! What am I supposed to do, go to Japan and watch them fark in person? That's inhumane. You can't skip forward to the good bits, you have to watch Captain Saliva gross you out for 15 minutes and I don't want to see that. Telstra are censoring my emissions, man. That's what this is. A plot to censor my output and drive up tourism on behalf of Big Saliva. I bet that once I'm out of the country, they'll have a spy come into my house and fart on my pillow. Right into it. So when I get home and flop into bed, thoroughly grossed out already, the Telstra guy's fart wafts up into my face. I'm onto them, man.


*slow clap*

You made me laugh. I needed that.
 
Displayed 50 of 53 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report