Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Bloomberg)   Thanks to the ban on plastic bags in Cali, thousands of jobs were lost, did not reduce littering and caused an outbreak of norovirus-induced diarrhea and nausea, and other stuff   (bloomberg.com) divider line 125
    More: Interesting, norovirus, Ramesh Ponnuru, reusable bags  
•       •       •

11149 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Feb 2013 at 8:40 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



125 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-02-05 08:32:34 AM  
Conservatives often point out that laws, no matter how benign they may appear, have unintended consequences.

Non-conservatives often point out that conservatives are often full of crap.

Klick and Wright estimate that the San Francisco ban results in a 46 percent increase in deaths from foodborne illnesses, or 5.5 more of them each year.

And what orifice was this pulled from?  Or do stores in San Francisco just sell unwrapped raw meat for people scoop into their grocery bags?
 
2013-02-05 08:34:39 AM  
There is not a single number about job loss in that article and 5.5 more deaths is probably within the margin of error and even then is not directly correlated to plastic bags in any way.

Quality stuff subby, mods.
 
2013-02-05 08:41:31 AM  
I thought it was going to be about people not picking up after their dogs because they didn't have plastic bags to do it with
 
2013-02-05 08:47:02 AM  

Dead for Tax Reasons: I thought it was going to be about people not picking up after their dogs because they didn't have plastic bags to do it with


Really good question. How do people in CA pick up dog poo without plastic bags? Most parks here have free plastic "scoopies" for cleanup, I'm assuming these are illegal too?
 
2013-02-05 08:48:44 AM  
It's the thought that counts
 
2013-02-05 08:49:53 AM  
.................condoms................
 
2013-02-05 08:50:26 AM  
Not good news for the company that makes these.
media.reason.com
 
2013-02-05 08:51:18 AM  

bearcats1983: Dead for Tax Reasons: I thought it was going to be about people not picking up after their dogs because they didn't have plastic bags to do it with

Really good question. How do people in CA pick up dog poo without plastic bags? Most parks here have free plastic "scoopies" for cleanup, I'm assuming these are illegal too?


With their hands.  THEIR HANDS.

Welcome to Obama's America.
/I keed, I keed.
 
2013-02-05 08:52:27 AM  
nanny state foolishness
 
2013-02-05 08:52:55 AM  
Was this article payed for by the Plastic Bag Makers of America? I tend to agree that bans on plastic bags are a little silly but not nearly as silly as this article.
 
2013-02-05 08:54:43 AM  
If we can't stop one person from discarding a plastic bag, then should we just toss them all in the street?
 
2013-02-05 08:57:10 AM  
The problem appears to be the habits of the reusers. Seventy-five percent said they keep meat and vegetables in the same bag. When bags were stored in hot car trunks for two hours, the bacteria grew tenfold.
That study also found, happily, that washing the bags eliminated 99.9 percent of the bacteria. It undercut even that good news, though, by finding that 97 percent of people reported that they never wash their bags.


Somehow I assume this author is generally chiding people about taking personal responsibility.

But clearly in this case they are powerless against the reusable bag conglomerate and their government backers, and are doomed to die because of it.
 
2013-02-05 08:57:35 AM  
Conservatives often point out that laws, no matter how benign they may appear, have unintended consequences

So their Medicare drug bill really WAS designed to destroy America then?
 
2013-02-05 08:57:53 AM  
You know, over here in a rather affluent county in Maryland, we have a "bag tax" on disposable grocery store bags. The whole movement was based on the idea that it would prevent those bags from winding up in the Potomac, and thus the Chesapeake Bay. I'm all for that. I like to kayak and fish, so I don't really like plastic in my streams. However, the amount of derp generated is beyond belief. It's fine to ban or tax plastic bags, but for the love of God, emphasize the switch back to sustainable paper bags which can be recycled, or, should you choose to be an ass and throw them out of your car window, bio-degrade rather readily. Instead, there's a focus on re-usable bags which have a finite life and will wind up in the landfill anyway, and won't break down because they too are made of plastic (in most cases).
 
2013-02-05 08:59:16 AM  

vpb: Conservatives often point out that laws, no matter how benign they may appear, have unintended consequences.

Non-conservatives often point out that conservatives are often full of crap.

Klick and Wright estimate that the San Francisco ban results in a 46 percent increase in deaths from foodborne illnesses, or 5.5 more of them each year.

And what orifice was this pulled from?  Or do stores in San Francisco just sell unwrapped raw meat for people scoop into their grocery bags?


Idiot. You don't shop, do you? You sound like Bush 41 staring in wonderment at a supermarket scanner. Meat wrappers - paper and plastic - occasionally leak. All it takes is a very small leak to contaminate a bag. And that leak will often not be noticed. Also, people often have other priorities that washing a farking bag.
 
2013-02-05 08:59:35 AM  
Oh dear. I just noticed I have a jar of pizza sauce in my pickup truck that is in one of those bags. I am confused and don't know what to do with it after reading the article.
 
2013-02-05 09:04:37 AM  
I think people re-using the bags from the dog poop for shopping may be the culprit here!
 
2013-02-05 09:05:04 AM  

vpb: And what orifice was this pulled from? Or do stores in San Francisco just sell unwrapped raw meat for people scoop into their grocery bags?


That shrink wrap leaks.  No big deal if you toss out the bag it leaks in but if you re-use it dozens of times it leads to problems.
 
2013-02-05 09:05:25 AM  

tallen702: However, the amount of derp generated is beyond belief. It's fine to ban or tax plastic bags, but for the love of God, emphasize the switch back to sustainable paper bags which can be recycled, or, should you choose to be an ass and throw them out of your car window, bio-degrade rather readily.


Yeah I didn't quite understand why they also placed the bag tax on paper bags, which certainly aren't polluting our streams. Apparently, the retailers complained that if only plastic bags were taxed, then everyone would just ask for paper bags, and those cost more (to the retailer) than plastic. So the MoCo politicians were convinced to tax both.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-02-05 09:05:42 AM  

Mark Ratner: Not good news for the company that makes these.
[media.reason.com image 300x206]


Wasn't that company in Cambodia?
 
2013-02-05 09:06:24 AM  
But there's a consensus that plastic bags are bad.  You wouldn't be stupid enough to disagree with a consensus, would you?
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-02-05 09:08:41 AM  

liam76: vpb: And what orifice was this pulled from? Or do stores in San Francisco just sell unwrapped raw meat for people scoop into their grocery bags?

That shrink wrap leaks.  No big deal if you toss out the bag it leaks in but if you re-use it dozens of times it leads to problems.


What problems?  Having to wash the bag?  Oh, I forgot;  using some soap and water is worse for the environment than disposable plastic bags, right?
 
2013-02-05 09:10:02 AM  
When I go to the grocery store, I like to buy a box of 1 quart ziplock bags and have them pack all my groceries in those. I bought them, so the stupid laws banning plastic bags can't stop me. The guy bagging my stuff loves it too...
 
2013-02-05 09:10:15 AM  
reusable shopping bags are intended for that purpose only. the soccer team kids getting sick from a bag in a hotel room seems like someone used that bag for diaper dirt then someone else was stupid enough to handle it. if the hotel maid disposed of it - and they usually use gloves and work with disinfectants - those children would not have got sick.

people are morans. i've bought over 60 reusable shopping bags. i'm lucky if i have 12 to use when food shopping. big thanks to Mrs.Kritter, who thinks reusable shopping bags are made to hold whatever crap shes tosses and stores in them in closets, the car trunk, the basement, at work etcetera.
 
2013-02-05 09:11:23 AM  
So the average conservative losses his sh*t approximately sixteen times a day. That requires 112 plastic poo-bags a week - or 5824 bags a year.
Kinda adds up - don't it?
 
2013-02-05 09:13:33 AM  

HotWingConspiracy: The problem appears to be the habits of the reusers. Seventy-five percent said they keep meat and vegetables in the same bag. When bags were stored in hot car trunks for two hours, the bacteria grew tenfold.
That study also found, happily, that washing the bags eliminated 99.9 percent of the bacteria. It undercut even that good news, though, by finding that 97 percent of people reported that they never wash their bags.

Somehow I assume this author is generally chiding people about taking personal responsibility.

But clearly in this case they are powerless against the reusable bag conglomerate and their government backers, and are doomed to die because of it.


Actually, there are actually those of us that are concerned that the estimated 5-15% of the population that doesn't have a washer/dryer will be hardest hit, as the poor will weigh the financial and time cost of washing their bags against the risk, and choose risk.

/"Efficiency and progress is ours once more"
 
2013-02-05 09:13:45 AM  
FTA A reusable grocery bag left in a hotel bathroom caused an outbreak of norovirus-induced diarrhea and nausea that struck nine of 13 members of a girls' soccer team in October, Oregon researchers reported Wednesday.".. In a 2011 study, four researchers examined reusable bags in California and Arizona and found that 51 percent of them contained coliform bacteria. The problem appears to be the habits of the reusers. Seventy-five percent said they keep meat and vegetables in the same bag.  When bags were stored in hot car trunks for two hours, the bacteria grew tenfold.

Why would anyone do either of those things? Do we need to put warning labels on shopping bags about treating them in a manner consistent with transporting food?
 
2013-02-05 09:14:46 AM  

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Idiot. You don't shop, do you? You sound like Bush 41 staring in wonderment at a supermarket scanner.


Snopes is your friend.
 
2013-02-05 09:15:06 AM  

ameeriklane: tallen702: However, the amount of derp generated is beyond belief. It's fine to ban or tax plastic bags, but for the love of God, emphasize the switch back to sustainable paper bags which can be recycled, or, should you choose to be an ass and throw them out of your car window, bio-degrade rather readily.

Yeah I didn't quite understand why they also placed the bag tax on paper bags, which certainly aren't polluting our streams. Apparently, the retailers complained that if only plastic bags were taxed, then everyone would just ask for paper bags, and those cost more (to the retailer) than plastic. So the MoCo politicians were convinced to tax both.


I guess that makes sense (well, not ecologically, but economically). Though like just about everything else in this state, the reality is that it's just a money grab. I DO like that the Taco Bell up in Germantown now uses paper bags for their stuff. Still, as a MoCo resident just 1/4 mile from the Fredneck county line, I kinda wish they'd move that line just a bit south. MoCo doesn't give a crap about me up in farm country other than my tax money. I'm closer to Frederick than Rockville when it all comes down to it.
 
2013-02-05 09:15:53 AM  

vpb: Conservatives often point out that laws, no matter how benign they may appear, have unintended consequences.

Non-conservatives often point out that conservatives are often full of crap.


Are you saying laws never have unintended consequences?
 
2013-02-05 09:16:13 AM  
I've got cloth grocery bags I use when I'm at the store. Never had a problem with meat getting lose in the bag, or rampant bacteria causing disease within them. If they get soiled they get washed along with whatever other dirty items of clothing that need washing at the time. No extra detergent, no extra hot water needed. I've got some of the non-cloth bags too that are made of recycled material and they hold up well even when I put lots of cans or bottles in them.

TFA is full of conservative derp about loss of choices and imaginary costs for non-plastic bags.
 
2013-02-05 09:19:02 AM  
I've always thought they should leave plastic bags in place, but, add in a recycle charge. Like they do for beer bottles. Each bag being the equivalent of one cent.
 
2013-02-05 09:19:47 AM  

KrispyKritter: reusable shopping bags are intended for that purpose only. the soccer team kids getting sick from a bag in a hotel room seems like someone used that bag for diaper dirt then someone else was stupid enough to handle it. if the hotel maid disposed of it - and they usually use gloves and work with disinfectants - those children would not have got sick.

people are morans. i've bought over 60 reusable shopping bags. i'm lucky if i have 12 to use when food shopping. big thanks to Mrs.Kritter, who thinks reusable shopping bags are made to hold whatever crap shes tosses and stores in them in closets, the car trunk, the basement, at work etcetera.


Nmemkha's Law #99.99 (aka IT WAS ON SALE!):
A woman will quickly fill any available storage space regardless of the amount of items she currently has in storage.

Its like giving an unopened bottle of whiskey to an alcoholic.
 
2013-02-05 09:22:44 AM  
There may or may not be issues of public health tied directly to the presence/absence of plastic shopping bags. But I think most would have to agree that this a calmly argued piece that not generally trying to overreach--it may be flawed but it is not insane. I for one am glad to see Ramesh Ponneru staying away from the full derp. Would that more people at the National Review do the same.
 
2013-02-05 09:23:08 AM  

mesmer242: HotWingConspiracy: The problem appears to be the habits of the reusers. Seventy-five percent said they keep meat and vegetables in the same bag. When bags were stored in hot car trunks for two hours, the bacteria grew tenfold.
That study also found, happily, that washing the bags eliminated 99.9 percent of the bacteria. It undercut even that good news, though, by finding that 97 percent of people reported that they never wash their bags.

Somehow I assume this author is generally chiding people about taking personal responsibility.

But clearly in this case they are powerless against the reusable bag conglomerate and their government backers, and are doomed to die because of it.

Actually, there are actually those of us that are concerned that the estimated 5-15% of the population that doesn't have a washer/dryer will be hardest hit, as the poor will weigh the financial and time cost of washing their bags against the risk, and choose risk.

/"Efficiency and progress is ours once more"


Do these people just throw away their clothes when they get dirty?
 
2013-02-05 09:27:45 AM  

tallen702: You know, over here in a rather affluent county in Maryland, we have a "bag tax" on disposable grocery store bags. The whole movement was based on the idea that it would prevent those bags from winding up in the Potomac, and thus the Chesapeake Bay. I'm all for that. I like to kayak and fish, so I don't really like plastic in my streams. However, the amount of derp generated is beyond belief. It's fine to ban or tax plastic bags, but for the love of God, emphasize the switch back to sustainable paper bags which can be recycled, or, should you choose to be an ass and throw them out of your car window, bio-degrade rather readily. Instead, there's a focus on re-usable bags which have a finite life and will wind up in the landfill anyway, and won't break down because they too are made of plastic (in most cases).


Get out of here with your "reason" and your "logic." Can't you see by the Boobies in this thread that you are only allowed to herp and/derp here?
 
2013-02-05 09:32:07 AM  

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: vpb: Conservatives often point out that laws, no matter how benign they may appear, have unintended consequences.

Non-conservatives often point out that conservatives are often full of crap.

Klick and Wright estimate that the San Francisco ban results in a 46 percent increase in deaths from foodborne illnesses, or 5.5 more of them each year.

And what orifice was this pulled from?  Or do stores in San Francisco just sell unwrapped raw meat for people scoop into their grocery bags?

Idiot. You don't shop, do you? You sound like Bush 41 staring in wonderment at a supermarket scanner. Meat wrappers - paper and plastic - occasionally leak. All it takes is a very small leak to contaminate a bag. And that leak will often not be noticed. Also, people often have other priorities that washing a farking bag.


Really, if you can't be trusted to carry home groceries and launder a few canvas bags, what the fark use are you to anyone?
 
2013-02-05 09:36:01 AM  
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-05 09:36:19 AM  

vpb: liam76: vpb: And what orifice was this pulled from? Or do stores in San Francisco just sell unwrapped raw meat for people scoop into their grocery bags?

That shrink wrap leaks.  No big deal if you toss out the bag it leaks in but if you re-use it dozens of times it leads to problems.

What problems?  Having to wash the bag?  Oh, I forgot;  using some soap and water is worse for the environment than disposable plastic bags, right?


Unrelated;

I work as a janitor, and we just got an aqueous ozone cleaning system to replace all our normal chemicals. It's just water and ozone. Works pretty amazing, but more amazing is its anti-microbial properties; demonstrably more effective than straight bleach. In about 10-15 years, they'll be common in homes (you can get a nice home system now, though it's pretty expensive) and the environmental impact of soap will be completely irrelevant. Aqueous ozone turns into just plain water after a few hours (depends on make/model of the unit).
 
2013-02-05 09:37:04 AM  
Or you could make friends with the local clerks, who don't care about the $.05 OR the bags, and will happily bag your items for free.

// there's your conservativism for you - a small businessman prefers a loyal clientele over GUBBERMINT COMPELD THEFT
 
2013-02-05 09:37:55 AM  
and yall keep voting Democrat....
 
2013-02-05 09:41:27 AM  
Just Another OC Homeless Guy:

Idiot. You don't shop, do you? You sound like Bush 41 staring in wonderment at a supermarket scanner. Meat wrappers - paper and plastic - occasionally leak. All it takes is a very small leak to contaminate a bag. And that leak will often not be noticed. Also, people often have other priorities that washing a farking bag.

Typical lib.  "Oh, dear government, please wash my bags for me.  I can't take any PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY in my life!!"
 
2013-02-05 09:42:20 AM  
Wash your bags, you dirty bag-reusing hippies.
 
2013-02-05 09:42:37 AM  
The reuseable bags sold by grocery stores don't always hold up well to washing.  I put a couple of Loblaws bags (made of polypropelene) into the washer and dryer, and they pilled-up and looked like shiat.  So I threw them out.  Probably the equivalent of a hundred "disposable" bags that got maybe a dozen uses.
 
2013-02-05 09:42:40 AM  

LavenderWolf: I work as a janitor, and we just got an aqueous ozone cleaning system to replace all our normal chemicals. It's just water and ozone.


Why not just use hydrogen peroxide? It breaks down into water, too.
 
2013-02-05 09:45:51 AM  

HotWingConspiracy: mesmer242: HotWingConspiracy: The problem appears to be the habits of the reusers. Seventy-five percent said they keep meat and vegetables in the same bag. When bags were stored in hot car trunks for two hours, the bacteria grew tenfold.
That study also found, happily, that washing the bags eliminated 99.9 percent of the bacteria. It undercut even that good news, though, by finding that 97 percent of people reported that they never wash their bags.

Somehow I assume this author is generally chiding people about taking personal responsibility.

But clearly in this case they are powerless against the reusable bag conglomerate and their government backers, and are doomed to die because of it.

Actually, there are actually those of us that are concerned that the estimated 5-15% of the population that doesn't have a washer/dryer will be hardest hit, as the poor will weigh the financial and time cost of washing their bags against the risk, and choose risk.

/"Efficiency and progress is ours once more"

Do these people just throw away their clothes when they get dirty?


It's called a laundromat
 
2013-02-05 09:47:34 AM  

GoldDude: The reuseable bags sold by grocery stores don't always hold up well to washing.  I put a couple of Loblaws bags (made of polypropelene) into the washer and dryer, and they pilled-up and looked like shiat.  So I threw them out.  Probably the equivalent of a hundred "disposable" bags that got maybe a dozen uses.


How do you reuse a plastic bag 12 times? We use it twice, once for groceries and once for garbage. Maybe three times, tops.
 
2013-02-05 09:50:25 AM  
We've been using reusable bags for many years now, it hasn't caused us any problems. Do the supermarkets not have small plastic bags to put meat into before putting it in a reusable? Do you not wash your produce? Do you not clean your reusable bags? Seriously this shiat isn't complicated. Put on your big girl panties and start taking care of yourselves and your possessions.
 
2013-02-05 09:51:09 AM  

vpb: Mark Ratner: Not good news for the company that makes these.
[media.reason.com image 300x206]

Wasn't that company in Cambodia?


Not sure, but a similar product was marketed to kids years ago:

"My guest tonight is Mr. Irwin Mainway, President of Mainway Novelties, and Chairman of the Board of Mainway Latex Corporation. Mr. Mainway, you are clearly the main flagrant offender in this area. For instance, your company manufactures and distributes  this Halloween costume.. [ picks it up and holds it ] ..Johnny Space Commander mask, which retails for $6.95. It's nothing more than a plastic bag and a rubber band. This is  very dangerous for young children!

Irwin Mainway: [ grabs the costume ] Okay, I'm gonna say something about my product right here, Johnny Space Commander mask. I want to say, first of all, it's a very fluid item, in terms of sales. I don't know, Miss Face, if you're familiar with the movie "Star Wars"? Well, this movie has generated a tremendous amount of popularity and enthusiasm about space and science fiction. [ rips open the costume packaging ] This Johnny Space Commander mask here is a pure fantasy toy. I mean, you know, kids can have a lot of fun with a toy like this, you know? Let me show you.. [ puts the plastic bag over his head, then wraps the rubber band around it ] "Hello, hello, this is Johnny Space Commander. I'm in deep space, I'm gonna land the rocket now!" You see what I mean? [ takes off the plastic bag ] You see what I mean? It's a pure fantasy toy!"
 
2013-02-05 09:52:23 AM  
Oh look, conservatives getting butthurt over stupid shiat again.

Got tired of raging about light bulbs did we?
 
Displayed 50 of 125 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report