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(NPR)   What makes you afraid? Scary movies? Clowns? Naked photos of Bea Arthur? Or breathing in air with high levels of carbon dioxide?   (npr.org) divider line 23
    More: Scary, Bea Arthur, Nature Neuroscience  
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7877 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Feb 2013 at 9:16 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-02-04 09:30:38 PM
2 votes:
football helmet of cottage cheese
2013-02-05 03:04:09 AM
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: OK, that experiment makes no sense to me at all.

"Fear" in the sense of being afraid of things like scary movies, haunted houses, even being attacked, is a pure emotional response. It's the part of the brain referenced--the amygdala--triggering a fight-or-flight response.

"Fear" in the sense of suffocating is a pure physical response. It's your brain stem telling your body it's dying and to get oxygen right away. The fact that these people experienced the same unpleasurable responses as what is normally CALLED "fear" doesn't mean they were afraid in the same sense that a normal person would be afraid if they saw a scary movie.

Instead of it being, as the researchers think, that "learned fears and innate ones are handled differently" it's just as likely that we're calling similar but unrelated physical and emotional responses by the same term; when in fact they are really unrelated.


That's why I was curious to know whether these folks still have a startle response.


ItchyBrother: Rolling a doughnut down the street, and being chased by a giant snake wearing a turtleneck sweater.


i133.photobucket.com
2013-02-05 02:20:19 AM
1 votes:
Falling into a gravity well that stretches the moment of death to the end of the relevant universe.
2013-02-05 01:15:55 AM
1 votes:
farm7.staticflickr.com
2013-02-05 12:40:54 AM
1 votes:

lack of warmth: However in the past, people were told to breath into a paper bag to calm down during a panic attack.  The former has always made sense to me and the later just causes the problem to be worse.


It's a little more complicated than that. Yeah, people have been given the paper bag, but there is a reason. Namely that you DO need CO2, and breathing fast and shallow makes you shed too much of it.

http://firstaid.about.com/od/shortnessofbreat1/f/07_paper_bags.htm
2013-02-05 12:19:54 AM
1 votes:

megarian: IsNoGood: I say this 11CM guy just muffing around on my floor the other day

Is....is the beer okay???


Tonic is fine, so was the gin I used with, the Centipede is kind of the worst of them all

Have a look, not for the easy scared and not my clip, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPlong_SV0I
2013-02-05 12:00:46 AM
1 votes:
A handful of dust.
2013-02-04 11:37:49 PM
1 votes:
President Willard 'mitt' Romney still wake up w/ that one. Shudder.
2013-02-04 11:28:32 PM
1 votes:
Usually none of these.
2013-02-04 11:19:47 PM
1 votes:
Stupid people in large groups.
2013-02-04 11:15:42 PM
1 votes:
2013-02-04 11:13:56 PM
1 votes:
1.bp.blogspot.com

The stuff of lunchroom nightmares!
2013-02-04 11:02:22 PM
1 votes:
images3.wikia.nocookie.net

\yum
2013-02-04 10:53:50 PM
1 votes:
Poverty
2013-02-04 10:51:48 PM
1 votes:
OK, that experiment makes no sense to me at all.

"Fear" in the sense of being afraid of things like scary movies, haunted houses, even being attacked, is a pure emotional response. It's the part of the brain referenced--the amygdala--triggering a fight-or-flight response.

"Fear" in the sense of suffocating is a pure physical response. It's your brain stem telling your body it's dying and to get oxygen right away. The fact that these people experienced the same unpleasurable responses as what is normally CALLED "fear" doesn't mean they were afraid in the same sense that a normal person would be afraid if they saw a scary movie.

Instead of it being, as the researchers think, that "learned fears and innate ones are handled differently" it's just as likely that we're calling similar but unrelated physical and emotional responses by the same term; when in fact they are really unrelated.
2013-02-04 10:07:14 PM
1 votes:
Lack of this

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com

There is no greater fear
2013-02-04 10:03:45 PM
1 votes:

Fano: Lotus seed pods where they don't belong


img.photobucket.com
2013-02-04 09:58:43 PM
1 votes:
Realtors.
2013-02-04 09:52:02 PM
1 votes:
gaiafrique.files.wordpress.com
Spiders covered in spiders
2013-02-04 09:48:25 PM
1 votes:

4seasons85!: Heights. It sucks. I want to ride more roller coasters, they look fun. However I end up having a serious panic attack at the thought of being that high up so it won't happen.


Try Space Mountain.
2013-02-04 09:45:33 PM
1 votes:
matthewvgreen.files.wordpress.com
2013-02-04 09:33:12 PM
1 votes:
Centipedes and vomiting.  I'd have a stroke if I ever saw a vomiting centipede.
2013-02-04 09:32:46 PM
1 votes:
Getting the type of cancer that kills me slowly.
My child dying before I do.
Running out of money before I die.
Getting a bad case of dementia/Alzheimer's disease.
Becoming crippled in a way that burdens my family.
 
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