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(Casper Star-Tribune)   Things for teens to do in a small, middle of nowhere town: Going to keggers, tipping cows, building nuclear fusion reactors in the shed. Wait, what?   (trib.com) divider line 90
    More: Cool, nuclear fusion reactors, nuclear reactors, World Geodetic System, science fairs, nuclear fusions, sheds, cattle, teens  
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5270 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Feb 2013 at 12:45 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-04 11:33:05 AM  
i292.photobucket.com

"Oh yeah? Look what I made."
 
2013-02-04 11:36:38 AM  
On sale at an auto parts store near you.
http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/EB00/121GMF.oap
 
2013-02-04 11:48:23 AM  
Neutron radiation much?
 
2013-02-04 12:21:35 PM  
I hope they don't have a HOA.
 
2013-02-04 12:53:42 PM  
Get that kid a scholarship STAT!
 
2013-02-04 12:55:56 PM  

basemetal: I hope they don't have a HOA.


It's rural Wyoming   Most of them can't spell HOA
 
2013-02-04 01:00:24 PM  
Farnsworth!
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-02-04 01:01:22 PM  
Today I learned there is an international amateur fusion community.

/that is all.
 
2013-02-04 01:01:40 PM  
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-04 01:02:03 PM  

Slaves2Darkness: Get that kid a scholarship outside of Wyoming STAT!


FTFY
 
2013-02-04 01:02:20 PM  
600 million degrees?

/skeptical
 
2013-02-04 01:02:38 PM  
 
2013-02-04 01:03:19 PM  

rufus-t-firefly: Huh. It's not a repeat.

http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/radscout.html


Note: that one was fun with fission.
 
2013-02-04 01:05:14 PM  
Interesting last name yet no mention of it in the article.  Or did I miss it?

FTFA: Conrad is the first person in Wyoming, and one of about 60 in the world, to achieve nuclear fusion.

LOL.
 
2013-02-04 01:07:21 PM  
Cow tipping is a myth.
 
2013-02-04 01:07:30 PM  
"Amateur fusion" ... Wow

It makes me proud, as an American, that we have people with such amazing talent and drive and ability to create such things. And that I live far away from the blast radius.
 
2013-02-04 01:09:55 PM  

rwfan: Interesting last name yet no mention of it in the article.  Or did I miss it?


"He stumbled onto the idea in seventh grade. Fusion sounded fascinating, and the father of fusion, Philo T. Farnsworth, shared his last name."
 
2013-02-04 01:11:23 PM  

Ned Stark: Cow tipping is a myth.


My childhood is a lie!!!
 
2013-02-04 01:11:37 PM  

Hack Patooey: 600 million degrees?

/skeptical


It's good to be skeptical, but in this case the temperature is referring to the motion of particles in a very localized region.
 
2013-02-04 01:15:51 PM  

Hack Patooey: 600 million degrees?

/skeptical


Heat and temperature are two different properties. Temperature is related to the velocity of the particles in the plasma. To get fusion to happen, you have to get particles moving fast enough to collide before electrostatic repulsion pushes them apart. The density of the plasma is very low, so heat capacity of this system is likewise going to be very low.
 
2013-02-04 01:17:48 PM  

zipdog: Hack Patooey: 600 million degrees?

/skeptical

Heat and temperature are two different properties. Temperature is related to the velocity of the particles in the plasma. To get fusion to happen, you have to get particles moving fast enough to collide before electrostatic repulsion pushes them apart. The density of the plasma is very low, so heat capacity of this system is likewise going to be very low.


Thanks, that explains it.

/wait, no it doesnt
//off to Google
 
2013-02-04 01:17:56 PM  
Way better than what David C. Hahn did.
 
2013-02-04 01:18:50 PM  

bearded clamorer: rwfan: Interesting last name yet no mention of it in the article.  Or did I miss it?

"He stumbled onto the idea in seventh grade. Fusion sounded fascinating, and the father of fusion, Philo T. Farnsworth, shared his last name."


I should have skimmed a little more thoroughly.

/high school student builds fusor has been pretty well done at this point but having the last name of Farnsworth is good for some bonus points.
 
2013-02-04 01:20:39 PM  

rwfan: Interesting last name yet no mention of it in the article.  Or did I miss it?

FTFA: Conrad is the first person in Wyoming, and one of about 60 in the world, to achieve nuclear fusion.

LOL.


honestly if you take everyone who's ever played with fusors into the equation, that number is REALLY low. like, several extra zero's off.

and it's technically fusion, which is great as that's actual fusion.

and when he dials the thing up to big-boy levels of output he'll get a nice neutron bath and kill someone with it, likely himself. if he's not already pre-cancerous like a mofo.

/prefer to play with alpha sources myself, like argon-39.
//need to build a fusor to use as a neutron source to MAKE stuff like argon 39 with...
 
2013-02-04 01:21:18 PM  
Very nice, especially considering how his father treats him.  FTA:


His dad tells him not to forget his roots. Tom Farnsworth made his money in oil. That money bought the shed where Conrad built his reactor and paid for the tools he used to make its parts.

"All I tell him is that if he invents something that does away with fossil fuels, it will be on him to take care of his mom and I," Tom Farnsworth said.

 Yeah son, don't bother saving the world with clean, renewable energy if it does away with the almighty fossil fuels!
 
2013-02-04 01:22:58 PM  

Hack Patooey: zipdog: Hack Patooey: 600 million degrees?

/skeptical

Heat and temperature are two different properties. Temperature is related to the velocity of the particles in the plasma. To get fusion to happen, you have to get particles moving fast enough to collide before electrostatic repulsion pushes them apart. The density of the plasma is very low, so heat capacity of this system is likewise going to be very low.

Thanks, that explains it.

/wait, no it doesnt
//off to Google


Wait until you find out that the Sun's corona is hotter than the surface.
 
2013-02-04 01:23:06 PM  
IEC? *click* Yep.

Neat. Here's a three-year-old instructible. Link
 
2013-02-04 01:25:55 PM  
FTA: "He's a risk taker, and he's not afraid to try something and not be right," she said. "He's OK with failure because then he can learn from it."

So, he's the sort of kid who'd rather beg forgiveness than ask permission?

Sounds like the sort of attitude you really want when handling nuclear fusion- which is of course the most forgiving science you could possibly imagine...
 
2013-02-04 01:40:34 PM  
the-big-bang-theory.com

Approves
 
2013-02-04 01:40:48 PM  

SnarfVader: Hack Patooey: zipdog: Hack Patooey: 600 million degrees?

/skeptical

Heat and temperature are two different properties. Temperature is related to the velocity of the particles in the plasma. To get fusion to happen, you have to get particles moving fast enough to collide before electrostatic repulsion pushes them apart. The density of the plasma is very low, so heat capacity of this system is likewise going to be very low.

Thanks, that explains it.

/wait, no it doesnt
//off to Google

Wait until you find out that the Sun's corona is hotter than the surface.


Stop that, I have things to do this afternoon!
 
2013-02-04 01:42:37 PM  

Hack Patooey: zipdog: Hack Patooey: 600 million degrees?

/skeptical

Heat and temperature are two different properties. Temperature is related to the velocity of the particles in the plasma. To get fusion to happen, you have to get particles moving fast enough to collide before electrostatic repulsion pushes them apart. The density of the plasma is very low, so heat capacity of this system is likewise going to be very low.

Thanks, that explains it.

/wait, no it doesnt
//off to Google


It's 600 million degrees, but only in a very small area; small as in atomic-scale small.  So if you took all that heat energy and spread it over a larger area, say an electric stovetop coil, you wouldn't even notice it.

Here's an analogy - take a paperclip, straighten it out.  Hold it by each end and start bending back and forth, back and forth.   After a minute or so you can still hold onto the ends no problem, but if you touch the middle, you'll burn yourself.
 
2013-02-04 01:42:39 PM  

Hack Patooey: SnarfVader: Hack Patooey: zipdog: Hack Patooey: 600 million degrees?

/skeptical

Heat and temperature are two different properties. Temperature is related to the velocity of the particles in the plasma. To get fusion to happen, you have to get particles moving fast enough to collide before electrostatic repulsion pushes them apart. The density of the plasma is very low, so heat capacity of this system is likewise going to be very low.

Thanks, that explains it.

/wait, no it doesnt
//off to Google

Wait until you find out that the Sun's corona is hotter than the surface.

Stop that, I have things to do this afternoon!


58,000 K versus 1 to 10 million K!
 
2013-02-04 01:45:53 PM  

buttery_shame_cave: rwfan: Interesting last name yet no mention of it in the article.  Or did I miss it?

FTFA: Conrad is the first person in Wyoming, and one of about 60 in the world, to achieve nuclear fusion.

LOL.

honestly if you take everyone who's ever played with fusors into the equation, that number is REALLY low. like, several extra zero's off.


Since the article is not referring to fusors specifically but fusion in general plus *world wide* that number is laughable.
 
2013-02-04 01:48:22 PM  
Sheldon?
 
2013-02-04 01:48:27 PM  

Karac: Hack Patooey: zipdog: Hack Patooey: 600 million degrees?

/skeptical

Heat and temperature are two different properties. Temperature is related to the velocity of the particles in the plasma. To get fusion to happen, you have to get particles moving fast enough to collide before electrostatic repulsion pushes them apart. The density of the plasma is very low, so heat capacity of this system is likewise going to be very low.

Thanks, that explains it.

/wait, no it doesnt
//off to Google

It's 600 million degrees, but only in a very small area; small as in atomic-scale small.  So if you took all that heat energy and spread it over a larger area, say an electric stovetop coil, you wouldn't even notice it.

Here's an analogy - take a paperclip, straighten it out.  Hold it by each end and start bending back and forth, back and forth.   After a minute or so you can still hold onto the ends no problem, but if you touch the middle, you'll burn yourself.


Or more straightforward: Turn your oven on and let it heat up to 250 degrees, then boil a pot of water. Next, put one hand in the oven and the other hand in the boiling water.

You'll discover that the higher density but slightly lower tenperature water burns your hand more than the higher temperature yet lower density air in the oven.
 
2013-02-04 01:49:03 PM  

ohokyeah: [the-big-bang-theory.com image 240x300]

Approves


*shakes tiny fist*


/I really need to learn to go through the ENTIRE thread before posting.
 
2013-02-04 01:58:36 PM  

Hack Patooey: Stop that, I have things to do this afternoon!


I want to investigate all they've said,
but bugs to test before I'm paid.
Bugs to test before I'm paid.

/leaves thread...reluctantly.
 
2013-02-04 01:59:36 PM  

Karac: Here's an analogy - take a paperclip, straighten it out. Hold it by each end and start bending back and forth, back and forth. After a minute or so you can still hold onto the ends no problem, but if you touch the middle, you'll burn yourself.


No you won't the paperclip with get brittle until it breaks due to Strain Hardening.
 
2013-02-04 02:19:55 PM  
His fusion reaction is too inefficient? Lol.

Well done in creating a penning trap to confine a plasma, but it is not fusion.
 
2013-02-04 02:31:29 PM  
tvmegasite.net

The what in the where now?
 
2013-02-04 02:33:52 PM  
Yes, it really is fusion. Although the temperature sounds very high, when you translate that to working voltage, it's in the 300,000-400,000 range. Philo Taylor Farnsworth built the first one in the 1950s and I can only wonder if there is a relationship, Farnsworth isn't all that common.
 
2013-02-04 02:37:18 PM  
 
2013-02-04 02:41:50 PM  
It's been done.
spacebison.com
 
2013-02-04 02:46:33 PM  

bearded clamorer: rwfan: Interesting last name yet no mention of it in the article.  Or did I miss it?

"He stumbled onto the idea in seventh grade. Fusion sounded fascinating, and the father of fusion, Philo T. Farnsworth, shared his last name."


something something Warehouse 13.
 
2013-02-04 02:51:13 PM  
So he made something by himself that scientists cannot?
 
2013-02-04 02:52:15 PM  
I am not liking any of the above analogies that "explain" the hundreds of millions of degree temperatures of the plasma of a fusor.  First of all temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of some substance.  So you can simply convert kinetic energy into temperature and back (ignoring statistical arguments about how much of something is required to talk about it's temperature).  An electron volt (eV) is the amount of kinetic energy given to an electron or a proton accelerated over one volt.  It's fairly easy produce kilovolt (that is typical CRT voltages) and above fields and thus keV plasma energies which as the plot below (which shows fusion reaction rates versus plasma temperature) indicates is the threshold energy you need to get to to produce fusion.  As indicated by the lower scale keV are in the 10's of millions of degrees Kelvin range.  Assuming the article is talking Fahrenheit you are easily in the hundreds of millions if not billions of degrees Fahrenheit.  So to me the key thing to realize is that it is really not that hard to produce a kilovolt field or the plasma that's going to be accelerated by the field (the hard part is producing the vacuum).
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-02-04 02:54:31 PM  

SpaceBison: It's been done.
[spacebison.com image 345x482]


as noted above fission != fusion
 
2013-02-04 02:54:47 PM  

machoprogrammer: So he made something by himself that scientists cannot?


No.  Just making fusion happen is not a problem.  Making fusion that produces more energy that it consumes (without leaving a miles-wide crater) is the problem.  He has not done that part - what he built could not power anything.
 
2013-02-04 02:56:09 PM  

SpaceBison: It's been done.
[spacebison.com image 345x482]


Came for radiation boy, leaving satisfied and glowing....
 
2013-02-04 03:10:22 PM  

Ned Stark: Cow tipping is a myth.


v022o.popscreen.com

Nope.  Real.  Saw it in a movie.
 
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