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(Humans Invent)   The breathable human skin-like material that could kill off air conditioning   (humansinvent.com) divider line 34
    More: Cool, skin  
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7105 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Feb 2013 at 10:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-04 09:15:49 AM
You mean I can finally get to wear another skin?  And I don't even have to fatten up a Senator's daughter and then flay her to do it?  Sign me up.  I'm all for sustainability.
 
2013-02-04 09:20:00 AM
RTFA: Dammit all.  I have to go buy a sewing machine.
 
2013-02-04 10:26:05 AM
In south Louisiana?  I think you overestimate their product.
 
2013-02-04 10:31:59 AM

Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: You mean I can finally get to wear another skin?  And I don't even have to fatten up a Senator's daughter and then flay her to do it?  Sign me up.  I'm all for sustainability.


But would you fark you?
 
2013-02-04 10:33:25 AM
Without phase change cooling the best you're going to get is room temp.
 
2013-02-04 10:35:23 AM

Fano: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: You mean I can finally get to wear another skin?  And I don't even have to fatten up a Senator's daughter and then flay her to do it?  Sign me up.  I'm all for sustainability.

But would you fark you?


I often don't have a choice if I'm to be farked at all.
 
2013-02-04 10:37:03 AM
Seems like it would be a big, corroded mess, after a while.
 
2013-02-04 10:38:18 AM
If they can heat it up, it'll rule the fleshlight market.
 
2013-02-04 10:55:00 AM
Modeling the skin of a building after human skin to keep it cool is all well and good until your building comes down with a case of monkey butt.
 
2013-02-04 11:00:53 AM
The designer doesn't entirely know what HVAC in a building is actually for. It isn't really about temperature. In fact, many buildings will still run the A/C when it is cold outside because the computers inside are making so much heat. What this idea fails to address is controlling humidity. Those open pores will allow humidity to rapidly rise inside - which makes a cool building clammy and uncomfortable or a warm building sweaty and uncomfortable. Nice try though.
 
2013-02-04 11:05:53 AM
In one. Damn.
 
2013-02-04 11:34:08 AM
I predict a lot of "I'm an engineer and this won't work because of x, y, z." Engineers seem to poo-poo any idea they haven't thought of.
 
2013-02-04 11:54:05 AM
While it doesn't work for taller buildings, planting some farking trees makes a HUGE difference and can reduce cooling costs significantly.
Shiat, in most cases you don't even need to plant them, just don't bulldoze them before you build.
 
2013-02-04 12:14:09 PM
FTA: Bearing in mind that 30-40% of all the energy we consume around the world goes into fueling buildings, it does make you wonder, wouldn't it be more efficient to open a window instead?

That's not always an option. Several times over the years, I've lived adjacent to neighbors who had pets or livestock. In the summer, it is the smell. The rest of the year, it is the noise.

If it were only noise, I could have gotten away with an HVAC whole house air exchanger. But unless you want to deal with carbon filters, it is just easier to get a heat pump or A/C unit.
 
2013-02-04 12:22:26 PM

hobberwickey: I predict a lot of "I'm an engineer and this won't work because of x, y, z." Engineers seem to poo-poo any idea they haven't thought of.


Its not that they haven't thought of it themselves, its they its something new. At least in the A&E field, most engineers don't want to be part of a project if it isn't something they have done exactly the same way 100 times before. Any new or unique idea that you bring to them gets stomped on if it doesn't fit into one of the standardized library of pre-solved equations they try to use on every project. Its frustrating because architects try to approach every project with the mindset of finding a new solution, and the engineer comes along and just wants to carbon-copy what they have already done.
 
2013-02-04 12:33:36 PM

LemSkroob: hobberwickey: I predict a lot of "I'm an engineer and this won't work because of x, y, z." Engineers seem to poo-poo any idea they haven't thought of.

Its not that they haven't thought of it themselves, its they its something new. At least in the A&E field, most engineers don't want to be part of a project if it isn't something they have done exactly the same way 100 times before. Any new or unique idea that you bring to them gets stomped on if it doesn't fit into one of the standardized library of pre-solved equations they try to use on every project. Its frustrating because architects try to approach every project with the mindset of finding a new solution, and the engineer comes along and just wants to carbon-copy what they have already done.


This is an institutionalized thing among architectural engineers.  It's what they're taught to do.

I know some people who have left AE programs because of it.
 
2013-02-04 12:41:10 PM
i50.tinypic.com
 
2013-02-04 12:54:17 PM
Riiight.  Come spend August in Atlanta, where both the ambient temperature and humidity can get well into the 90s, then we'll talk about eliminating air conditioning.
 
2013-02-04 02:50:27 PM

CmndrFish: LemSkroob: hobberwickey: I predict a lot of "I'm an engineer and this won't work because of x, y, z." Engineers seem to poo-poo any idea they haven't thought of.

Its not that they haven't thought of it themselves, its they its something new. At least in the A&E field, most engineers don't want to be part of a project if it isn't something they have done exactly the same way 100 times before. Any new or unique idea that you bring to them gets stomped on if it doesn't fit into one of the standardized library of pre-solved equations they try to use on every project. Its frustrating because architects try to approach every project with the mindset of finding a new solution, and the engineer comes along and just wants to carbon-copy what they have already done.

This is an institutionalized thing among architectural engineers.  It's what they're taught to do.

I know some people who have left AE programs because of it.


yeah, i thought that might be as such. As i said, i was only speaking for the A&E field's engineers. Obviously guys in the computer programming, robotics, aeronautics, etc are defined by their new ideas, but it seems engineers who only want to run the same batch of formulas over and over again seem to wind up in A&E. Yay for me to have to deal with them.
 
2013-02-04 03:01:20 PM
I love how so many people in this thread take the headline literally instead of thinking about the practical applications of what's shown in TFA. Of course it's not going to work for every building everywhere, and yes, the idea seems to consider the temperature outside rather than the temperature inside. But it's just a proof of concept at this point, and it's something architects could consider when creating new buildings. Maybe in some cases it will work instead of A/C, in other cases in conjunction with A/C. It's not all all-or-nothing concept, so get the sticks out of your butts and embrace innovation.
 
2013-02-04 03:30:27 PM

Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: You mean I can finally get to wear another skin?  And I don't even have to fatten up a Senator's daughter and then flay her to do it?  Sign me up.  I'm all for sustainability.


What makes fattened up Senator's daughters not sustainable?
 
2013-02-04 04:22:04 PM
It puts the lotion on its concrete or else it gets the planes again
 
2013-02-04 07:39:41 PM
The southern United States would have a third of the population it does if A/C hadn't been invented. You ever been in Houston in the summer? I'd rather freeze my ass off than deal with that without A/C.
 
2013-02-04 11:20:08 PM
Companies who are serious about energy efficiency build down.  No fancy skin is needed when the outside temperature is always twenty degrees C.

/very few companies are serious about energy efficiency
//Those that do have to keep the pumps going, though
 
2013-02-05 12:27:10 AM
You'll be taking my air con from my warm dead hands. And I don't care if you have four skins on.
 
2013-02-05 12:40:33 AM

imgod2u: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: You mean I can finally get to wear another skin?  And I don't even have to fatten up a Senator's daughter and then flay her to do it?  Sign me up.  I'm all for sustainability.

What makes fattened up Senator's daughters not sustainable?


It takes 4 earths to feed her.
 
2013-02-05 02:54:05 AM

bigmoneygrip: In south Louisiana?  I think you overestimate their product.


First thing I thought.

It might work in low humidity climates and places where the population isn't already completely dependent on AC.
 
2013-02-05 04:04:02 AM

LemSkroob: Any new or unique idea that you bring to them gets stomped on if it doesn't fit into one of the standardized library of pre-solved equations they try to use on every project. Its frustrating because architects try to approach every project with the mindset of finding a new solution, and the engineer comes along and just wants to carbon-copy what they have already done.


I think you may misunderstand the basis of "engineering" and its differences from "research".
 
2013-02-05 04:25:07 AM

DammitIForgotMyLogin: It puts the lotion on its concrete or else it gets the planes again


That is hands down the funniest thing I've seen all week.
 
2013-02-05 06:27:42 AM
BRILLIANT! not

It corrodes like a motherfarker, would break and shatter off, weights massive amounts, increases wind resistance, has a spring coil effect...

I can only imagine the little bits slicing through the air onto the people below... and INVARIABLY one of the metals has to be one that is toxic when inhaled.

stupid is stupid
 
2013-02-05 07:36:42 AM

LemSkroob: CmndrFish: LemSkroob: hobberwickey: I predict a lot of "I'm an engineer and this won't work because of x, y, z." Engineers seem to poo-poo any idea they haven't thought of.

Its not that they haven't thought of it themselves, its they its something new. At least in the A&E field, most engineers don't want to be part of a project if it isn't something they have done exactly the same way 100 times before. Any new or unique idea that you bring to them gets stomped on if it doesn't fit into one of the standardized library of pre-solved equations they try to use on every project. Its frustrating because architects try to approach every project with the mindset of finding a new solution, and the engineer comes along and just wants to carbon-copy what they have already done.

This is an institutionalized thing among architectural engineers.  It's what they're taught to do.

I know some people who have left AE programs because of it.

yeah, i thought that might be as such. As i said, i was only speaking for the A&E field's engineers. Obviously guys in the computer programming, robotics, aeronautics, etc are defined by their new ideas, but it seems engineers who only want to run the same batch of formulas over and over again seem to wind up in A&E. Yay for me to have to deal with them.


That's because when shiat goes bad in the design, the architect's name shows up in the newspaper.  The engineer's name shows up on the lawsuit.
 
2013-02-05 08:34:00 AM

100 Watt Walrus: I love how so many people in this thread take the headline literally instead of thinking about the practical applications of what's shown in TFA. Of course it's not going to work for every building everywhere, and yes, the idea seems to consider the temperature outside rather than the temperature inside. But it's just a proof of concept at this point, and it's something architects could consider when creating new buildings. Maybe in some cases it will work instead of A/C, in other cases in conjunction with A/C. It's not all all-or-nothing concept, so get the sticks out of your butts and embrace innovation.


You can tell that a lot of people didn't read the article.   Where this will come in really useful is on all of these new LEED certified buildings.   They have to have so much ambient light from outdoors to reduce electricity usage.  If they could get these metal shutters to fold in such a way that they block direct light and reflect dispersed light, you could end up with more overall ambient lighting and put the brunt of the insolation on the metal pieces themselves.
 
2013-02-05 08:38:46 AM

prjindigo: BRILLIANT! not

It corrodes like a motherfarker, would break and shatter off, weights massive amounts, increases wind resistance, has a spring coil effect...

I can only imagine the little bits slicing through the air onto the people below... and INVARIABLY one of the metals has to be one that is toxic when inhaled.

stupid is stupid


That's right, we've never invented a clear coating that prevents corrosion.
Metal tends to bend, not shatter.
The weight for a whole building would be an impressive number, but the individual peices will probably weigh no more than an empty coke can.
The little bits, if they did fall off would probably behave like confetti, not a guillotine.
and the metals discuss were steel/copper.  If those are found to be toxic, we have much bigger issues.   I'm trying to figure out how they're going to be inhaled?  I imagine inhaling any type of thin metal sheeting is bad for your health.  They aren't going to be aerosolized by reacting to temperature change, and if we're getting hot enough to release metal fumes, then we're dead anyways.

non-scientist is stupid.
 
2013-02-05 05:25:24 PM
I've worked in greenhouses for over 10 years.  We have to deal with a lot of interaction between the climate and heat sensing technology meant to assist in controlling temperatures.  The material in the article sounds cool (no pun intended), but in reality, it's a logistical nightmare.

If it had some sort of control it could be nifty, but as it stands it's supposed to be passive and passive solar models would not work very well in an office-like building for many reasons.  I would be surprised if this made it past an initial testing period.
 
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