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(Washington Post)   Step 1) School system to copyright and claim ownership over all teacher and student work. Step 2) ???? Step 3) Profit   (washingtonpost.com ) divider line 13
    More: Asinine, Prince George's, school systems  
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9411 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Feb 2013 at 3:37 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-03 03:59:17 PM  
4 votes:
Except I am not being paid to develop materials for a school system but to instruct students. Places which have copyright over employee work have employees which develop materials. Besides, trying to copyright student work seems unreasonable... students are the consumers, so this would akin to Adobe claiming copyright over all works produced with Photoshop.
2013-02-03 03:35:26 PM  
4 votes:

GAT_00: Same thing companies do to all of their employees work.  If you have a problem with this, you must have a problem with that.


completely different situation. Nobody is forced to go to work somewhere. You can't opt out of taxpayer funded compulsory K-12 education.
2013-02-03 04:49:37 PM  
2 votes:
Private property shall not be taken for a public use, without just compensation.
2013-02-03 03:57:26 PM  
2 votes:
Prince Georges County is the richest black county in the US.  Most of it's elected representatives and members of the school board are black.  Prince Georges, also. has one of the nation's most brutal police forces which indulge in beating the crap out of black men.  The cops are both black and white.  When you think deep backwards racist south, you are really thinking about Prince Georges County in the Peoples Republic of Maryland.  Black people really hate black people.
2013-02-03 02:19:19 PM  
2 votes:
In the University context, where the school may be a private research institution that is sponsoring research labs and paying grad students to advance its mission, I can see the argument for something like a shop right doctrine.  I may not like it, but I can understand it.

But this is a public K-12 school system, funded entirely through tax dollars.  Attendance is compulsory.  The equities seem very different.

Also, who's really going to buy a coffee table book of 1st grade art?  I barely want to hang my own kid's stuff on the fridge.
2013-02-04 11:10:59 AM  
1 vote:
Besides all else that is grossly wrong with this idea, I'm surprised I'm the first in this thread to mention child labor laws...
2013-02-03 06:22:41 PM  
1 vote:
Oh, students are not contractors, either.  So they still aren't subject to "work for hire."
2013-02-03 05:47:43 PM  
1 vote:
Employees usually sign agreements along this line when they start work...  but when would a student ever have agreed to this?  The no-compensation already seems shady enough, but there is simply no voluntary agreement established in that relationship, so I don't see when they could possibly establish this 'right'.  They cannot just unilaterally say someone else's work is theirs.
2013-02-03 05:16:46 PM  
1 vote:
i309.photobucket.com
2013-02-03 04:41:49 PM  
1 vote:

GAT_00: Same thing companies do to all of their employees work.  If you have a problem with this, you must have a problem with that.


My company does not own the rights to anything I make with my own materials on my own time. If I were to do it with their equipment on company time then sure. The article seems to indicate that all work created by a student or teacher on their own time with their own property would be owned by the school system. That is where I have an issue.

FTA: It's not unusual for a company to hold the rights to an employee's work, copyright policy experts said. But the Prince George's policy goes a step further by saying that work created for the school by employees during their own time and using their own materials is the school system's property.
2013-02-03 04:01:40 PM  
1 vote:
I don't see how this can be constitutional in a compulsory situation. It's peonage.
2013-02-03 03:52:27 PM  
1 vote:
GAT_00: Same thing companies do to all of their employees work.  If you have a problem with this, you must have a problem with that.

completely different situation. Nobody is forced to go to work somewhere. You can't opt out of taxpayer funded compulsory K-12 education.

Homeschool


Home schooling is an option of the parent, not the student.  The student can't opt for homeschooling without a parent or guardian to do the actual home schooling.  Therefore your solution fails to address the underlying problem - the student him/herself does not have the ability to opt out on his/her own.
2013-02-03 12:50:07 PM  
1 vote:
Isn't that the unofficial Modus Operandi of EVERY University on the planet?

Also, Step 2 is sell said copyright or patent.
 
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