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(UPI)   Where is your cod now?   (upi.com) divider line 38
    More: Sad, fishing industry, Department of Commerce, Gulf of Maine, Cape Cod  
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2669 clicks; posted to Business » on 03 Feb 2013 at 3:58 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-02 11:43:26 PM
"Right now what we've got is a plan that guarantees the fishermen's extinction and does nothing to ameliorate it," he said.

So just let them fish cod into extinction? Sounds like a great plan.
 
2013-02-03 12:25:41 AM
In before someone starts trolling

/who needs those haddocks?
//yeah... that smelt
 
2013-02-03 12:34:04 AM
Somewhere, Mark Kurlansky just nods sadly.
 
2013-02-03 12:53:29 AM
 
2013-02-03 02:54:07 AM

fusillade762: "Right now what we've got is a plan that guarantees the fishermen's extinction and does nothing to ameliorate it," he said.

So just let them fish cod into extinction? Sounds like a great plan.


Oh come on, if we just let the free market have its way, we'd never fish or hunt any animal into extinction.  Because why would the fisherman fish themselves out of business?  They won't, they're the perfect stewards of sustainability and humans have never been known to be short sighted and put short term gain against long term success.  Just ask the American Bison or whales, or passenger pigeon.
 
2013-02-03 04:30:08 AM
So long...and thanks for all the fish.
 
2013-02-03 05:01:50 AM
You know, if they didn't bottom trawl (seriously that's a disgusting practice akin to clear cutting a forest to catch elk), didn't overfish, set up a fair sized protected areas, and maybe banded together to fight pollution from farms, cities, and industry that degraded water quality... well, then they wouldn't have this problem. The fish didn't disappear on their own.

That said, there is some criminal mismanagement that led to stocks collapsing to the point that they have to cut the quotas down so low. But now that the managers are actually, you know, managing, it would be good to step to the side for a while and see if things get better.
 
2013-02-03 06:04:42 AM
The fishing area known as the Grand Banks (off the coast of Newfoundland) was once the richest cod fishery in the world.

Around 25 years ago, scientists at Fisheries and Oceans Canada (a government agency) warned that fisheries practices were unsustainable. They recommended reducing catch quotas by half.

Under pressure from the fishing industry, the politicians failed to act for 4-5 years. Finally, in 1992, they imposed a moratorium on the industry. It was too late -- the cod population collapsed. It was hoped that under the fishing ban, cod stocks would eventually recover. Tens of thousands of fishermen lost their livelihoods. The fishery remains closed to this day.
 
2013-02-03 06:24:09 AM
TY, subby. Plus one.
Now, I am not a New Englander, but I do feel you folks' pain. I really do. My Adoptive mom was one, and I grew up reading Yankee. And I wish to all of the gods that I had a simple solution. I lack one.
Tale some comfort in that you are not alone- things are tough all over.
You folks are resilient- I would hope to see some of you folks have charters and take anglers and scientists and even tourists out. Get creative- some folks like to snorkel or freedive in cold water, and you do have an abundance of it ..
What I am saying is we do need to stop fishing that species, so find another way of making money, please.Juts for the time being, or we will potentially never have the fish to fish for again.
I welcome objections. I do in fact care about this rock and I like to eat fish.
 
2013-02-03 06:26:51 AM
Happened here in Newfoundland in '92.
 
2013-02-03 06:29:55 AM
I also hope that the brave folks of the Coast Guard find a way to stop busting pot shipments and enforce fisheries rules as far as foreign vessels go, which they have failed at. imho
 
2013-02-03 07:16:32 AM
the Simpsons did an episode on this. if we don't fish it to extinction we'll go broke / we fished it to extinction now we're broke. sad but true: not all businesses can last you a lifetime. i've seen bowling alleys become mini indoor malls, indoor tennis/raquet ball court clubs become office spaces, slot car race track shops become hardware stores and VHS Rental joints become a hundred other businesses. part of being a wise business person is staying awake at the wheel and getting the heck out of dodge before your DeLorean dealership goes bankrupt. "we've done this all our lives" does not mean 'we can't go back to school and learn a new trade'.
 
2013-02-03 07:19:13 AM
I have fished off the New England coast since the 1960's.  Up until the mid-70s you could rent a boat for a day and fill it with whatever you wanted - cod, haddock, flounder, pollack, tuna, mackerel, you name it.

Today you're lucky if you go home with a couple of cusks for chowder.

The fish are gone.  The fishermens job here is done.  You won.  Go home and find another line of work, for all our sakes.  And foreign boats should be blasted out of the water by the Coast Guard as far as I'm concerned.
 
2013-02-03 07:43:23 AM
Meanwhile foreign long liners fish without restraint. This happened in the Gulf of Mexico a decade, err two decades, ago.
 
2013-02-03 08:06:00 AM
My cod is in my freezer, just waiting to be made into delicious fish cakes.
 
2013-02-03 08:14:52 AM

fusillade762: So just let them fish cod into extinction? Sounds like a great plan.


Right?  The fishermen's jobs aren't going to last very long if we run out of cod, but it's like that hasn't even occurred to them.
 
2013-02-03 08:18:17 AM
Only when the last fish has been caught, only when the last tree has been cut down, only when the last stream has been poisoned will Man learn that he cannot eat money.
 
2013-02-03 08:21:28 AM
www.comicbookmovie.com

                                             RIP- Zod
 
2013-02-03 08:46:26 AM
We can always eat Tilapia...

/ I kid
 
2013-02-03 09:16:43 AM

fusillade762: "Right now what we've got is a plan that guarantees the fishermen's extinction and does nothing to ameliorate it," he said.

So just let them fish cod into extinction? Sounds like a great plan.


You do know he was referring to the fisherman, right? The sad part is, it's completely reasonable when applied to the fish....

I'm amazed at how shortsighted the fisherman are...
 
2013-02-03 10:06:00 AM

fusillade762: "Right now what we've got is a plan that guarantees the fishermen's extinction and does nothing to ameliorate it," he said.

So just let them fish cod into extinction? Sounds like a great plan.


He likes your plan, Chief!
 
2013-02-03 11:16:27 AM

D_Moran: The fishing area known as the Grand Banks (off the coast of Newfoundland) was once the richest cod fishery in the world.

Around 25 years ago, scientists at Fisheries and Oceans Canada (a government agency) warned that fisheries practices were unsustainable. They recommended reducing catch quotas by half.

Under pressure from the fishing industry, the politicians failed to act for 4-5 years. Finally, in 1992, they imposed a moratorium on the industry. It was too late -- the cod population collapsed. It was hoped that under the fishing ban, cod stocks would eventually recover. Tens of thousands of fishermen lost their livelihoods. The fishery remains closed to this day.


It may never recover even though fishing is closed. Cod were the top predator, feeding on stuff like herring.  Without the Cod, those prey populations have exploded, but they feed on stuff like Cod eggs and fry. So the Cod can't reproduce any more. Maybe someday, a protected population will be able to reproduce up to a level where they can survive, but it is going to take some kind of special once in who knows how long circumstances for that to happen.
 
2013-02-03 12:37:24 PM

Glenford: My cod is in my freezer, just waiting to be made into delicious fish cakes.


My cod is beneath my belt buckle.
 
2013-02-03 01:00:50 PM

HMS_Blinkin: fusillade762: So just let them fish cod into extinction? Sounds like a great plan.

Right?  The fishermen's jobs aren't going to last very long if we run out of cod, but it's like that hasn't even occurred to them.


It looks to me like a classic case of denial. I keep reading comments from the fishermen about how there's plenty of fish out there and the scientists are all clueless.
 
2013-02-03 01:16:40 PM

fusillade762: "Right now what we've got is a plan that guarantees the fishermen's extinction and does nothing to ameliorate it," he said.

So just let them fish cod into extinction? Sounds like a great plan.


aka, kicking and screaming cause you're the last one off the burning boat sinking, and were too stupid to notice.

If it's about keeping your industry, family tradition and fishing culture alive; you like this stuff.   If it's because you were too brain dead to prepare for anything else to bring in an income, then you're going to squeeze that lemon into a diamond.

Lobstah'in has made a comeback because of these sort of protections.  We've waited too long for other fisheries.
 
2013-02-03 03:20:51 PM
Fishing cod to extinction is the only way to save the fishing industry.

Checkmate, hippies.
 
2013-02-03 03:36:09 PM
I'm wondering if I'm wasting my time by posting this, but here goes.

While I think it's great that there are so many conservation minded people in this thread (not sarcasm), there is also some ignorance.  It's a pretty simple solution to blame the "greedy" fisherman, feel better about ourselves in light of this condemnation, and move on with our day.  The truth is always more complicated.

I grew up in Port Orford, a small coastal town in Oregon.  My Grandpa was a fisherman.  My Dad is a fisherman.  I worked on the boat through highschool and for a few years after gradution to make ends meet while I was in college.  I know firsthand how the industry works because I lived it.  Today, I live in the liberal bastion of Eugene, OR.  I also see (and understand) the other side of the coin.  I fully agree that fish populations need to be managed and sustained.  But the vitriol that is thrown at people that literally put food on your table really gets under my skin.

The first thing you need to understand, it's not as simple as finding a new job.  I can't speak to the east coast as I don't have any familiarity with it, but where I'm from it is  more than these people's job, it's their way of life.  Were the fishery to shut down, it would be devastating to the entire community. I'm honestly not sure the town could survive it's loss.  Growing up there was a huge factor in what makes me who I am today.  It instilled my sense of community, my work ethic, and shaped in more ways than I can define.  You can't simply shut down an entire industry without a much bigger impact than the people that work in it.  I'm talking about their dependants, other local businesses that rely on the income generated by the fisherman, the school districts, tax revenues etc.  I find it interesting that people have no problem mocking and rediculing the uneducated, poor masses that supposedly inhabit the south, and yet they react with vehemance and scorn at people simply trying to prevent themselves from falling into that stereotype.  These people are far from rich.  They work long days, of dangerous physical labor to make a living for their families.  They simply want to be able to continue to provide for themselves.  That's it.  Take a look at the demographics in the link above if you don't believe me.  How many of you would ridicule the displaced fishermen next week for being lazy dependants if their sole industry was taken away?

I appologize if this seems like a rant, but there is more to the issue than most people understand.  If you have read this far, and are interested in seeing both sides of the debate, check out this documentary.  It is more focused on ocean conservation in general, but there are portions specifically dedicated to understanding how commercial fishing and conservation can co-exist.

Thanks and Regards.
 
2013-02-03 06:34:00 PM

Jesterslayer: They simply want to be able to continue to provide for themselves.


They can't if there's no fish.
 
2013-02-03 07:35:59 PM

ShawnDoc: fusillade762: "Right now what we've got is a plan that guarantees the fishermen's extinction and does nothing to ameliorate it," he said.

So just let them fish cod into extinction? Sounds like a great plan.

Oh come on, if we just let the free market have its way, we'd never fish or hunt any animal into extinction.  Because why would the fisherman fish themselves out of business?  They won't, they're the perfect stewards of sustainability and humans have never been known to be short sighted and put short term gain against long term success.  Just ask the American Bison or whales, or passenger pigeon.


Tragedy of the commons. Affects fish along with alot of other things.
 
2013-02-03 10:11:14 PM

Jesterslayer: I'm wondering if I'm wasting my time by posting this, but here goes.

While I think it's great that there are so many conservation minded people in this thread (not sarcasm), there is also some ignorance.  It's a pretty simple solution to blame the "greedy" fisherman, feel better about ourselves in light of this condemnation, and move on with our day.  The truth is always more complicated.

I grew up in Port Orford, a small coastal town in Oregon.  My Grandpa was a fisherman.  My Dad is a fisherman.  I worked on the boat through highschool and for a few years after gradution to make ends meet while I was in college.  I know firsthand how the industry works because I lived it.  Today, I live in the liberal bastion of Eugene, OR.  I also see (and understand) the other side of the coin.  I fully agree that fish populations need to be managed and sustained.  But the vitriol that is thrown at people that literally put food on your table really gets under my skin.

The first thing you need to understand, it's not as simple as finding a new job.  I can't speak to the east coast as I don't have any familiarity with it, but where I'm from it is  more than these people's job, it's their way of life.  Were the fishery to shut down, it would be devastating to the entire community. I'm honestly not sure the town could survive it's loss.  Growing up there was a huge factor in what makes me who I am today.  It instilled my sense of community, my work ethic, and shaped in more ways than I can define.  You can't simply shut down an entire industry without a much bigger impact than the people that work in it.  I'm talking about their dependants, other local businesses that rely on the income generated by the fisherman, the school districts, tax revenues etc.  I find it interesting that people have no problem mocking and rediculing the uneducated, poor masses that supposedly inhabit the south, and yet they react with vehemance and scorn at people simply trying to prevent themselves from falling into that stereotype.  These people are far from rich.  They work long days, of dangerous physical labor to make a living for their families.  They simply want to be able to continue to provide for themselves.  That's it.  Take a look at the demographics in the link above if you don't believe me.  How many of you would ridicule the displaced fishermen next week for being lazy dependants if their sole industry was taken away?

I appologize if this seems like a rant, but there is more to the issue than most people understand.  If you have read this far, and are interested in seeing both sides of the debate, check out this documentary.  It is more focused on ocean conservation in general, but there are portions specifically dedicated to understanding how commercial fishing and conservation can co-exist.

Thanks and Regards.


As a New England native I've seen this play out in the fishing industry over the past few decades. I don't want to sound unsympathetic but the handwriting has been on the wall for a long time now. Sure, I feel bad for the fishermen and their families but as others have pointed out, the tragedy of the commons is in play here. The fishermen in New England have been opposing quotas designed to protect fish stocks for a long time. Every year there are fewer fish and every year the fishermen complain that the government won't let them catch more.
 
2013-02-04 12:02:36 AM
I would like to chime in as being someone from a place where they used to have large stocks of fish.

This is going to happen to everything. We know this and we don't care.

Man versus Nature: The Road to Victory.
 
2013-02-04 12:11:43 AM
t1.gstatic.com
                               R.I.P. COD

/thank god
 
2013-02-04 03:41:21 AM
if the fish the cod into extinction they will be out jobs anyway.  A little short term hardship will help save the industry from its self.
 
2013-02-04 10:40:56 AM

Jesterslayer: I'm wondering if I'm wasting my time by posting this, but here goes.

While I think it's great that there are so many conservation minded people in this thread (not sarcasm), there is also some ignorance.  It's a pretty simple solution to blame the "greedy" fisherman, feel better about ourselves in light of this condemnation, and move on with our day.  The truth is always more complicated.


No, it is pretty simple. Did they act to prevent the problem Yes/No???

Stocks do not just deplete over night, they deplete over years. This has happened in other parts of the world, so there is NO FARKING EXCUSE for not seeing it comong, and realizing that they need to try and prevent it.

The fisherman are the ones on the front ines, they are the ones seeing the catches, if the catches go down, it is their responsibility to report it, and look into getting the catches back up. It is their livelyhood at stake after all. They are the ones who need to be sending up the red flags, not the ones trying to take them down.

Any fisherman who did not try to help the stock levels, or acted against efforts to mantain them is at fault, and deserving of blame, and deserves NO assistance with their situation as they caused it in the first place.
 
2013-02-04 11:20:28 AM
Here on Chesapeake Bay we got lucky. The rockfish ( striped bass ) population dropped dramatically due to pollution and overfishing after Hurricane Agnes in 1973. It was further pressured when commercial watermen and sportfisherman fought tooth and nail to protect their ability to take fish. The end result was a full moratorium for many years and now strict size and season limits. The rock came back, thanks to scientists ability to convince politicians of the danger of continued uncontrolled fishing.

Now, if would only do smoething about oysters ....
 
2013-02-04 01:08:14 PM

sjmcc13: No, it is pretty simple. Did they act to prevent the problem Yes/No???


Again, I'm speaking only to my firsthand knowledge of where I'm from.

In short, the answer is yes.

Link
 
2013-02-05 12:45:04 PM
If we all switch to catfish, just for a few years the Cod will recover. But no one wants to do that.
 
2013-02-05 02:06:55 PM
The fishing industry in New England destroyed it's own livelihood. The only way their current attitude makes sense is if they are angling for fat subsidies to compensate for the catch limits. I live on Cape Ann; I get the history and tradition and many sacrifices over the years. But getting angry that you're not allowed to pull every last cod out of waters that for centuries were renowned for their abundance is just madness. Interestingly enough Gloucester, one of the largest traditional fishing hubs around here, has undergone somewhat of an urban renewal lately after years of decline. So hopefully the transition to new industries and sources of income won't be a total disaster.
 
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