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(Huffington Post)   Why American pisswater beer company wants to buy Mexican pisswater beer company   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 19
    More: Asinine, Budweiser, Victoria Jackson, Mexican, InBev, craft brewers, Brewers Association, dry cask storage, 38th state  
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7290 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Feb 2013 at 4:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-02 08:13:42 AM  
3 votes:
As the article suggests, this move is about trying to gain even more leverage over the distributors. If you walk down the beer aisle at grocery store, it might look like there is a lot of diversity among products, but chances are 85% of the beers will be InBev, SABMiller, Molson-Coors, and Grupo Modelo products. The rest likely will be from Guinness (Diageo), Samuel Adams, Sierra Nevada, maybe one or two local breweries, and the brands owned by Pabst. When one of the big boys offers a new product it requires shelf space, which then leaves less room for the beers from the smaller breweries.

Of course there are some grocery stores with a selection that rivals anything you can find in a specialty shop, but they are the exception. Most provide only the illusion of diversity. If my beer choices became restricted to products made by the big boys, I'd probably buy some Goose Island (owned by InBev), Blue Moon (owned by Coors), and Guinness, but for the most part I'd end up drinking much less beer. I've become accustomed to being able to select from a wide variety of beers from a wide variety of breweries, so I definitely don't want InBev or anybody to have even more control over what goes on the shelves.
2013-02-02 06:43:44 AM  
3 votes:
Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf
What I don't understand is why big beer sees craft beer as a threat to their sales instead of a growing business opportunity they could get into and make a lot of money on.


Actually if you see who makes those six-packs with those quirky labels at your local 7-11 or quicky mart, see who makes it. It probably isn't a small european brewer or some guy making beer in his garage. It probably is inbev or coors, because they are probably the only ones allow to stock it.

More then that why does Inbev products, Clearchannel, EA, mediacom, sony, AT&T's, BP's gas or any other generally evil corporation's product suck?

Because they are not trying to make a great product, they are trying to make a somewhat palatable product though the most minimal resources possible, while selling their product for as much as possible.

Why do people choose crap industrial beer, listen to crap fm radio, play crap franchise sports games, buy internet service that breaks at least twice month, buy electronics that are limited by design, or choose to buy gas from people that simply put, pollute as part of the intended consequences of their corporate policy?

Because that is a feature of getting maximum value for shareholders.
2013-02-02 12:04:29 AM  
3 votes:
2013-02-01 11:53:49 PM  
3 votes:
It's not an American company.  ImBev was originally a merger of Belgian and Brazilian companies.  They are the Bain Capital of beer.  They buy up major brands, slash benefits, lay off workers, switch to lower quality ingredients for their products, and then profit.  There's rumors that once they lock up the beer market that they'll go after Pepsi-Co.
2013-02-01 09:13:12 PM  
3 votes:
Budweiser is American? News to me.
2013-02-02 10:08:54 AM  
2 votes:

AirForbes1: The Wack: Did anyone else notice how, after the article, the slides show on America's 20 top selling craft beers included Widmere Brothers and Red Hook (both owned by InBev)?

I wonder how many people know the following craft products and imports are actually InBev products:
Bass
Becks
Boddingtons
Franziskaner Weissbier
Goose Island
Hoegaarden
Leffe
Redhook (partial)
Widmer Brothers (partial)

I'm not anti-big business and I don't have a crisis of conscience when I have a Spaten Oktoberfest or some Honkers Ale. I am a supporter of the so-called free market, but I believe markets work best when there is ample competition. There's never been a better time to be a beer consumer in the United States, and I hope it will remain that way.


I am anti-big business. I'm tired of being given the illusion of choice, the illusion of competition. In fact, that shiat pisses me right off - which is not to say I have a crisis of conscience every time I get a beer (or anything else) that is made by big business, but I try, especially with beer, to support the little guys.  The micro-brew industry is one of the few popular places is our modern society that I actually can see the fight against corporate monopolization (or pseudo-monopolization by a select handful of companies) actually seeming to retrograde, a little.

/rant off
2013-02-02 12:27:40 AM  
2 votes:
There is a bottle of Corona in my fridge that some asshole left after a bonfire about a year ago. I've sometimes thought about throwing it away but it's become a bit of an experiment to see who, when told to go and help themselves to a drink, might take it.
2013-02-02 06:37:52 PM  
1 votes:

Valiente: I can't tell you how much this affects me, because that would involve giving a fark.


I can tell you how it affects me because I make craft beer for a living and we go through an AB house for distribution and we've seen a marked decline in service from them over the past few years, and seen the toil the buisness shift has taken its toll on the workers we deal with through that distribution company. even to the point that items from our shipments have started to vanish at the docks so we needed to start making multiple signed counts of orders to verify with the folks on the other side that it wasn't us that shorted the order, and that some shady people they may hired at minimum wage is make shiat walk away.

the craft division of this distribution company is doing the best they can, but the lead division has forced them allocate resources back to the mainline brands they have historically covered.

lets also couple that with current explosion of the craft brew segment as a whole... seemingly everyone and their brother is opening a craft brewery nowadays, all the little guys are fighting for attention as well.

the market will eventually sort itself out.. and I've lived and worked through one bubble as it is, and I see all the signs pointing towards a new one building up.. it's all good news for consumers up until the point that the market is once again flooded by a bunch of mediocre beers with funny names, made by people who have no business being in the business.

but ABInbev is not in the business to kill AB, it's in the biz to sell beer and make a profit as posted previously. but these are multinational corporations. and the macro beer business is much like the soda pop industry in a lot of ways, and they have taken a lot of cues from the cola wars as well.  In a lot of ways, there really is not a lot of difference between Bud select and Mountain Dew code red once you get down to the rusty nuts of the situation.


It's a very interesting business to be in, and study. it can be a very cut throat world of back stabbing and dirty deals. Piracy and sabotage. one of my great past times is just listening to old beer guys tell war stories.
2013-02-02 05:40:53 PM  
1 votes:
Subby is a pretentious prick that should e banned from ever having children.

/non drinker
//beer snobs are worse than coffee snobs.
2013-02-02 09:24:57 AM  
1 votes:
content8.flixster.com

Making love in a canoe?
2013-02-02 08:59:35 AM  
1 votes:

The Wack: Did anyone else notice how, after the article, the slides show on America's 20 top selling craft beers included Widmere Brothers and Red Hook (both owned by InBev)?


I wonder how many people know the following craft products and imports are actually InBev products:
Bass
Becks
Boddingtons
Franziskaner Weissbier
Goose Island
Hoegaarden
Leffe
Redhook (partial)
Widmer Brothers (partial)

I'm not anti-big business and I don't have a crisis of conscience when I have a Spaten Oktoberfest or some Honkers Ale. I am a supporter of the so-called free market, but I believe markets work best when there is ample competition. There's never been a better time to be a beer consumer in the United States, and I hope it will remain that way.
2013-02-02 08:33:25 AM  
1 votes:

AirForbes1: As the article suggests, this move is about trying to gain even more leverage over the distributors. If you walk down the beer aisle at grocery store, it might look like there is a lot of diversity among products, but chances are 85% of the beers will be InBev, SABMiller, Molson-Coors, and Grupo Modelo products. The rest likely will be from Guinness (Diageo), Samuel Adams, Sierra Nevada, maybe one or two local breweries, and the brands owned by Pabst. When one of the big boys offers a new product it requires shelf space, which then leaves less room for the beers from the smaller breweries.


Not only that, but there's the problem of successful craft brewers getting gobbled up by the majors (I'm looking at you, Goose Island), and the somewhat related rise of faux craft beers like Blue Moon that give little or no indication on the package that they're all about taking even more shelf space.
2013-02-02 08:03:23 AM  
1 votes:
I like all kinds of beers, including many German beers.  I like strong beers.  Hoppy beers.  Beers with tons of character.  I hate Budweiser and all of the other flavorless American beers (to me, Coors Light is the very worst but Bud Light is also undrinkable).

But Corona with lime is a great beer, especially on a hot summer afternoon.
2013-02-02 06:56:37 AM  
1 votes:

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: What I don't understand is why big beer sees craft beer as a threat to their sales instead of a growing business opportunity they could get into and make a lot of money on.


Because there is a lower profit margin in craft beer.  Sure, they can charge more for craft beers, but even at a higher price they generally return a lower profit. And so long as craft beers only account for 5% of the total market share, they see no need to get into that market. 

As for declining beer sales, I do not see that as being due to increase sale of craft beers.  I believe it has more to do with people switching to different beverage types, such as wine or hard liquor.
2013-02-02 05:49:17 AM  
1 votes:
Why American Belgian/Brazillian pisswater beer company wants to buy Mexican pisswater beer company.

FTFY

/ Former IT contractor that worked for AB before and after Inbev buyout. (2007-2010)
// Quit after 2 reductions in pay over the course of 3 years due to outsourcing of outsourcing companies.
/// Entire department went to shiat and most of the old crew were laid off/forced out of the job. I was one of the last ones to go.
//// Not bitter, just telling the facts.
2013-02-02 05:37:48 AM  
1 votes:
What I don't understand is why big beer sees craft beer as a threat to their sales instead of a growing business opportunity they could get into and make a lot of money on.
2013-02-02 05:27:34 AM  
1 votes:

violentsalvation: DanZero: [bminusblogs.files.wordpress.com image 850x634]

Why not? They seem to be doing pretty well with it

It is pretty good of them to turn off the piss water pipeline when disaster strikes and can up a bunch of water for people in need.


I hate their beer (I would rather pay for bottled water than drink free Bud), but I really like the fact that they will stop production of their beer and can up water to send to disaster areas.  If they actually made a beer that I enjoyed I would but more of it because of that.
2013-02-02 04:54:20 AM  
1 votes:
It's like a bad marriage.

img209.imageshack.us
2013-02-02 12:18:41 AM  
1 votes:
"We must slow the volume trend of High End Segment and cannot let the industry transform,"

Yeah, God forbid you be forced to stop making shiatty beer.
 
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