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(Entertainment Weekly)   Stephen King talks about his sequel to "The Shining." "But one of the things - and I'm not sure if this is going to be a problem for readers or not - is that Doctor Sleep is a sequel to the novel. It's not a sequel to the Kubrick film"   (shelf-life.ew.com) divider line 95
    More: Scary, Doctor Sleep, Jack Torrance, Apollo Creed, Jason Voorhees, William Faulkner, Rocky Balboa, Stanley Kubrick, HMM?  
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3058 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 01 Feb 2013 at 10:05 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-01 07:00:53 PM
Good!

Kubrick was a hack
 
2013-02-01 07:33:14 PM
Good interview. Interesting what he says at the end, that The Stand isn't connected to his other books, in light of the fact that Roland and company walk through a version of plague Topeka.
 
2013-02-01 08:20:29 PM

Majick Thise: Good!

Kubrick was a hack


And King isn't?
 
2013-02-01 08:29:43 PM

naughtyrev: Good interview. Interesting what he says at the end, that The Stand isn't connected to his other books, in light of the fact that Roland and company walk through a version of plague Topeka.


I think he was saying that most of his books take place in the same universe, like you could drive from Castle Rock to Salem's Lot if you wanted, but The Stand takes place in another one. Roland could still visit it though, cause of doors between worlds and all that jazz.
 
2013-02-01 08:38:04 PM

Confabulat: naughtyrev: Good interview. Interesting what he says at the end, that The Stand isn't connected to his other books, in light of the fact that Roland and company walk through a version of plague Topeka.

I think he was saying that most of his books take place in the same universe, like you could drive from Castle Rock to Salem's Lot if you wanted, but The Stand takes place in another one. Roland could still visit it though, cause of doors between worlds and all that jazz.


Makes sense.
 
2013-02-01 08:44:24 PM

fusillade762: Majick Thise: Good!

Kubrick was a hack

And King isn't?


I don't think so.  King touches on this idea in the article.  What scared 13 year-old me reading a King book doesn't do it anymore.  I'm not such an easy target.

King proved time and again he could stray out of the horror genre quite successfully.  I don't like some of his more recent stuff, but I wouldn't call him a hack.  Stephenie Meyer is a hack.  Dean Koontz is a hack.  There's a difference.

My opinion, anyway.
 
2013-02-01 08:51:31 PM
Hacks don't generally have a good sense of humor. I often find myself laughing out loud at some of what King writes.
 
j4x
2013-02-01 08:52:34 PM

fusillade762: Majick Thise: Good!

Kubrick was a hack

And King isn't?


11/22/63
 
2013-02-01 09:12:26 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: I don't think so. King touches on this idea in the article. What scared 13 year-old me reading a King book doesn't do it anymore. I'm not such an easy target.

King proved time and again he could stray out of the horror genre quite successfully. I don't like some of his more recent stuff, but I wouldn't call him a hack. Stephenie Meyer is a hack. Dean Koontz is a hack. There's a difference.

My opinion, anyway.


This is Fark.  Anyone who is popular is a hack.
 
2013-02-01 09:13:33 PM
A hack would be someone who wrote a sequel to the hugely well-known movie, instead of his own novel. I'm talking about Michael Crichton here.
 
2013-02-01 10:23:05 PM
IMO, a good film of The Shining has not been made, and may never be. The TV version in the 90's was more true to the novel, but I enjoyed it even less than Kubrick's.

I haven't read anything new by King in many years, I might have to break out my library card.
 
2013-02-01 10:25:12 PM
The Shining is one of the few King Books I haven't read (since the late 1990's anyway). So its sufficiently different from the movie that I should give it a try? Good to know.
 
2013-02-01 10:25:47 PM

Repo Man: IMO, a good film of The Shining has not been made, and may never be. The TV version in the 90's was more true to the novel, but I enjoyed it even less than Kubrick's.

I haven't read anything new by King in many years, I might have to break out my library card.


HBO could probably remake the miniseries with pretty good results. The production of the original miniseries may have been cheap, but I did like the casting of the guy from Wings.
 
2013-02-01 10:27:14 PM

ilikeracecars: The Shining is one of the few King Books I haven't read (since the late 1990's anyway). So its sufficiently different from the movie that I should give it a try? Good to know.


There are some similarities between the book and movie, but that's about it. They are drastically different stories.

Not quite 'Lawnmower Man' different, though.
 
2013-02-01 10:29:18 PM
The Kubrick film was infinitely better than King's book. It could have used another half hour.
 
2013-02-01 10:31:14 PM
hey, someone should make a movie of Rage!

wait. what?
 
2013-02-01 10:32:07 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: fusillade762: Majick Thise: Good!

Kubrick was a hack

And King isn't?

I don't think so.  King touches on this idea in the article.  What scared 13 year-old me reading a King book doesn't do it anymore.  I'm not such an easy target.

King proved time and again he could stray out of the horror genre quite successfully.


I rather liked 11/22/63.  And the Tommyknockers.  Both were riveting reads, but decidedly sci-fi rather than horror.  The Dark Tower series is mostly fantasy, and those are some of his best works.
 
2013-02-01 10:35:39 PM
The Kubrick film was infinitely better than King's book. It could have used another half hour.

Couldn't disagree more.  Kubrick's film doesn't come anywhere close to what King's novel envisioned.
 
2013-02-01 10:40:57 PM
While we're on the topic of inferior film adaptations, has anyone else seen the abortion that is "John Dies at the End"? Don Coscarelli needs to be shot...
 
2013-02-01 10:45:32 PM
The giant teddy bear blowing the butler better be involved.
 
2013-02-01 10:52:57 PM
I found the part where King discussed young readers really liking his works to ring true.

I quite enjoyed his books as a tween to teen, and don't really care to continue reading them as an adult. I started Under the Dome, but never finished it.

I really enjoyed his earliest works quite a bit. Carrie, Salem's Lot, The Shining, and The Stand were all written in the '70's.

After that, the last book that I really remember the plot of is The Tommyknockers in the late '80's.
 
2013-02-01 10:53:01 PM

NeoCortex42: ilikeracecars: The Shining is one of the few King Books I haven't read (since the late 1990's anyway). So its sufficiently different from the movie that I should give it a try? Good to know.

There are some similarities between the book and movie, but that's about it. They are drastically different stories.

Not quite 'Lawnmower Man' different, though.


Heh, forgot about the Lawnmower man. WTF happened there.
 
2013-02-01 10:53:02 PM
I've read all of King's books aside from Danse Macabre.  I seem to be in the minority, but I think 11/22/63 is an awful book, and especially awful in light of what else King has written.  Like really, his worst book ever.  He just seemed so out of touch, so old, so clumsy, I felt embarassed for him.  And his epilogue (or afterword, I forget which) just drove the point home.

The Shining's a great book and a great movie.  I'll be interested to see what this sequel brings.
 
2013-02-01 10:57:38 PM

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: While we're on the topic of inferior film adaptations, has anyone else seen the abortion that is "John Dies at the End"? Don Coscarelli needs to be shot...


I loved the book and I enjoyed the film. I'm not sure how one could do a truly faithful adaptation of the book.

I really like Don Coscarelli; Phantasm is one of my favorite films.
 
2013-02-01 10:58:47 PM
I read somewhere recently that he'd softened his criticism of Kubricks movie. Apparently not.
 
2013-02-01 11:02:48 PM

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: While we're on the topic of inferior film adaptations, has anyone else seen the abortion that is "John Dies at the End"? Don Coscarelli needs to be shot...


It's a pretty literal adaptation of a very odd book. However, like Hitchhiker's Guide, a lot of the charm of the book is the way it's written, not so much the storyline itself.

It's also hard to hate on Paul Giamatti. Everybody should see Win Win. It's a very well done character piece where he takes a starring instead of just a supporting role.
 
2013-02-01 11:05:48 PM

RoyHobbs22: The giant teddy bear blowing the butler better be involved.


No scene has haunted me more in a film than that one...
 
2013-02-01 11:13:12 PM

naughtyrev: Confabulat: naughtyrev: Good interview. Interesting what he says at the end, that The Stand isn't connected to his other books, in light of the fact that Roland and company walk through a version of plague Topeka.

I think he was saying that most of his books take place in the same universe, like you could drive from Castle Rock to Salem's Lot if you wanted, but The Stand takes place in another one. Roland could still visit it though, cause of doors between worlds and all that jazz.

Makes sense.


What I wanna know is why Daniel Torrance (and Carrie White and Charlene "Charlie" McGee, for that matter) weren't tapped to be Breakers. They were perfect candidates for that. You could even say that the nefarious government agency known as "The Shop" was actually a front organization of the Red King in that world, like North Central Positronics and the Dixie Pig restaurant were.

Yet, none of those three novels are considered Dark Tower-related (or at least weren't boldfaced as such in the list of Stephen King novels in the inside front covers of the last few Dark Tower books). Why not!?
 
2013-02-01 11:18:19 PM
Never read the book, but I saw the Kubrick film and the miniseries that was supposed to be closer to the source material.

The Kubrick film was better. I'm curious about a sequel either way though, so I may have to read the original book first.
 
2013-02-01 11:20:12 PM

I liked both the book and Kubrick's version of it. I thought the TV version was worse than both the book and the movie. The kid in the TV series was really annoying and the whole production was sub-par. Steven Weber was miscast as Jack. The CGI hedge animals was laughable.


When I was a kid, this trailer scared the crap out of me.


And so did this "Magic" trailer.
 
2013-02-01 11:21:48 PM

FLMountainMan: I've read all of King's books aside from Danse Macabre.  I seem to be in the minority, but I think 11/22/63 is an awful book, and especially awful in light of what else King has written.


I really enjoyed Danse Macabre, particularly his chapter on horror films (it may have been more than a chapter).  Clued me in to a bunch of movies I didn't know existed.  Of course, I was 13 at the time and there was no internet so YRMV.
 
2013-02-01 11:22:30 PM

MisatoNERV: RoyHobbs22: The giant teddy bear blowing the butler better be involved.

No scene has haunted me more in a film than that one...


This one gets me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zH8ynu0jRvY
 
2013-02-01 11:22:59 PM
Kubrick can do no wrong imo.
(So take the following with a grain of salt.)

Sorry Stephen, I love ya man but... sometimes you have to recognize that when you permit other artists to use your work, history may deem the rework the quintessential version, not the original. See: Trent Reznor's 'Hurt' vs the Johnny Cash version.

When it comes down to it, a film who's popularity is that of what The Shining is; far far far more people will associate that film with the story than the novel.

This is not always the case with film vs book as we all know. In fact, concerning Stephen King I know most people I've talked to consider The Stand the best version of that story even having seen and liking the movie/mini-series version.

Other examples of this from Kubrick's side is A Clockwork Orange and 2001, I'm not sure if it's true for a majority of people (I didn't take a poll) but I know many many people that identify those two stories with the novels and not the movies.

King just needs to get over it. Kubrick one-upped him, it happens. Moving past it would seem better than being remembered as trying to continually assault what will probably be remembered as (one of) the greatest directors of the 20th century.

And yeah, I get that Kubrick started it.

/Could you imagine if in 1995 if Howard Fast had still been biatching that his novelization of Spartacus was so much better than Kubrick's juggernaut?
//you're better than this King
///Under the Dome is pretty damn good if anyone is looking for a King book to read
 
2013-02-01 11:25:23 PM

Wayne 985: Never read the book, but I saw the Kubrick film and the miniseries that was supposed to be closer to the source material.

The Kubrick film was better. I'm curious about a sequel either way though, so I may have to read the original book first.


Kubricks was much better than the mini-series. Havn't read the book in ages; may have to give it another try after I finish the latest from Stephen Hunter--The Third Bullet. Yes, it's about the JFK assassination.
 
2013-02-01 11:27:15 PM

skinink: I liked both the book and Kubrick's version of it. I thought the TV version was worse than both the book and the movie. The kid in the TV series was really annoying and the whole production was sub-par. Steven Weber was miscast as Jack. The CGI hedge animals was laughable.
When I was a kid, this trailer scared the crap out of me.
And so did this "Magic" trailer.


Beyond the Door.
 
2013-02-01 11:30:04 PM

crypticsatellite: skinink: I liked both the book and Kubrick's version of it. I thought the TV version was worse than both the book and the movie. The kid in the TV series was really annoying and the whole production was sub-par. Steven Weber was miscast as Jack. The CGI hedge animals was laughable.
When I was a kid, this trailer scared the crap out of me.
And so did this "Magic" trailer.

Beyond the Door.


Thanks for ah.......um.....bringing back long repressed childhood nightmares.
 
2013-02-01 11:30:43 PM

Red Shirt Blues: crypticsatellite: skinink: I liked both the book and Kubrick's version of it. I thought the TV version was worse than both the book and the movie. The kid in the TV series was really annoying and the whole production was sub-par. Steven Weber was miscast as Jack. The CGI hedge animals was laughable.
When I was a kid, this trailer scared the crap out of me.
And so did this "Magic" trailer.

Beyond the Door.

Thanks for ah.......um.....bringing back long repressed childhood nightmares.


Just sharing the pain! :)
 
2013-02-01 11:34:38 PM
On my nook I downloaded The Shining and The Stand. I haven't read them in years (1980's). It was a fun and creepy trip down memory lane. The last King book I read was Insomnia which I thought was horrible. I thought Tommyknockers was the start of his decline. Maybe I'll revisit his works. Didn't like the Dark Tower series but that has more to due with my preferences than the writing.
 
2013-02-01 11:39:22 PM

Speaker2Animals: Hacks don't generally have a good sense of humor. I often find myself laughing out loud at some of what King writes.


Me too.

i121.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-01 11:44:57 PM

BullBearMS: SacriliciousBeerSwiller: While we're on the topic of inferior film adaptations, has anyone else seen the abortion that is "John Dies at the End"? Don Coscarelli needs to be shot...

It's a pretty literal adaptation of a very odd book. However, like Hitchhiker's Guide, a lot of the charm of the book is the way it's written, not so much the storyline itself.

It's also hard to hate on Paul Giamatti. Everybody should see Win Win. It's a very well done character piece where he takes a starring instead of just a supporting role.


That's disappointing to hear. I loved the book but have yet to see the movie and I was quite looking forward to it.
 
2013-02-01 11:45:55 PM

NeoCortex42: ilikeracecars: The Shining is one of the few King Books I haven't read (since the late 1990's anyway). So its sufficiently different from the movie that I should give it a try? Good to know.

There are some similarities between the book and movie, but that's about it. They are drastically different stories.

Not quite 'Lawnmower Man' different, though.


Or "The Running Man" different.
 
2013-02-01 11:46:30 PM

fusillade762: BullBearMS: SacriliciousBeerSwiller: While we're on the topic of inferior film adaptations, has anyone else seen the abortion that is "John Dies at the End"? Don Coscarelli needs to be shot...

It's a pretty literal adaptation of a very odd book. However, like Hitchhiker's Guide, a lot of the charm of the book is the way it's written, not so much the storyline itself.

It's also hard to hate on Paul Giamatti. Everybody should see Win Win. It's a very well done character piece where he takes a starring instead of just a supporting role.

That's disappointing to hear. I loved the book but have yet to see the movie and I was quite looking forward to it.


It's still worth seeing--I enjoyed it; it distilled the plot quite a bit, but I really don't know how they could have adapted everything from the book to film.
 
2013-02-01 11:52:59 PM

crypticsatellite: fusillade762: BullBearMS: SacriliciousBeerSwiller: While we're on the topic of inferior film adaptations, has anyone else seen the abortion that is "John Dies at the End"? Don Coscarelli needs to be shot...

It's a pretty literal adaptation of a very odd book. However, like Hitchhiker's Guide, a lot of the charm of the book is the way it's written, not so much the storyline itself.

It's also hard to hate on Paul Giamatti. Everybody should see Win Win. It's a very well done character piece where he takes a starring instead of just a supporting role.

That's disappointing to hear. I loved the book but have yet to see the movie and I was quite looking forward to it.

It's still worth seeing--I enjoyed it; it distilled the plot quite a bit, but I really don't know how they could have adapted everything from the book to film.


I agree.  It's still worth seeing.

I saw the movie first and read the book (and it's sequel) afterwards.
 
2013-02-01 11:58:03 PM

Omahawg: hey, someone should make a movie of Rage!

wait. what?


I think there are negotiations to get the Running Man as a reality series, although we've already seen the ending on tv.
 
2013-02-01 11:58:56 PM

crypticsatellite: SacriliciousBeerSwiller: While we're on the topic of inferior film adaptations, has anyone else seen the abortion that is "John Dies at the End"? Don Coscarelli needs to be shot...

I loved the book and I enjoyed the film. I'm not sure how one could do a truly faithful adaptation of the book.

I really like Don Coscarelli; Phantasm is one of my favorite films.


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-02 12:00:08 AM
I've said it before, and I;ll say it again:

I read the last 1/4 to 1/3 of Duma Key in one 7-hour sitting. No food, no drink, no potty, just me and book. I haven't been that sucked in to a story in a long, long time.
 
2013-02-02 12:02:27 AM

Confabulat: naughtyrev: Good interview. Interesting what he says at the end, that The Stand isn't connected to his other books, in light of the fact that Roland and company walk through a version of plague Topeka.

I think he was saying that most of his books take place in the same universe, like you could drive from Castle Rock to Salem's Lot if you wanted, but The Stand takes place in another one. Roland could still visit it though, cause of doors between worlds and all that jazz.


According to Mother Abigail from The Stand... "Some people just shine!"
 
2013-02-02 12:04:21 AM

Mulchpuppy: FLMountainMan: I've read all of King's books aside from Danse Macabre.  I seem to be in the minority, but I think 11/22/63 is an awful book, and especially awful in light of what else King has written.

I really enjoyed Danse Macabre, particularly his chapter on horror films (it may have been more than a chapter).  Clued me in to a bunch of movies I didn't know existed.  Of course, I was 13 at the time and there was no internet so YRMV.


If he has a book most in need of a sequel, it's that one. I'd love to see his take on horror post 1980. Difficulty: It will mean he will have to be self-reflective, as he was a major force there.

Fun chapter: he makes you guess the horror film based on a fairy tale description.

The Glass Teat is a great one too. You know what? Anyone that likes horror should read Danse Macabre. His mindset shows that he is serious about his craft and appeciates the people in his field. Mining for gold in B-movies and genre literature can be rewarding.
 
2013-02-02 12:28:26 AM
i.imgur.com
Wait, what?
 
2013-02-02 12:29:27 AM

Dumb-Ass-Monkey: I've said it before, and I;ll say it again:

I read the last 1/4 to 1/3 of Duma Key in one 7-hour sitting. No food, no drink, no potty, just me and book. I haven't been that sucked in to a story in a long, long time.


So much this. That was a great book.
 
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