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(Boing Boing)   Back in the day we used to use "modems" to get "on-line". It used to take all night to download a single pixelated picture of your mom. Here is an illustrated explanation of the funny sounds these modems made   (boingboing.net) divider line 154
    More: Interesting, online, modems  
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7688 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Feb 2013 at 5:09 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-01 09:52:51 PM
www.mailsend-online.com

My first modem. Came with a rotary dial phone which I still have. Also had 2 hours of free COMPUSERVE!
 
2013-02-01 09:57:26 PM

Marcus Aurelius: Zarquon's Flat Tire: You know, to a horticulturist, that was damn near gibberish.

If you mean the frequencies and amplitudes that the modems used to communicate, it helps to listen to it slowed down to human speed.

The two machines basically say "hello" and then test the quality of the connection by saturating the analog bandwidth.

It's actually quite beautiful.


That was the second most terrifying thing I've heard all week. The first most was the link on that video taking me to a Justin Bieber song slowed down 800x.
 
2013-02-01 10:12:48 PM

Rising Ape: RexTalionis: I'm sorry, but do you not use a modem now to go online?

Indeed you do, unless you're lucky enough to have fibre to the home.



I have a fiber connection in the home and a modem is still a must. How else are you going to transmit data between the multitude of broadbnd dependent devices in modern households? My phones jump to my modem for data when they are within range, it powers my tablet, Xbox, and probably something else I cant remember.

On topic, how do you disable the little yellow ad plea bar at the top of the page when you have AdBlock enabled?
 
2013-02-01 10:18:17 PM

HMS_Blinkin: Zombalupagus: xenomorpheus: MrEricSir: Mikey1969: 300baud: Uncle Pooky: I remember when getting a 14,400 baud modem was a significant upgrade.

Noob.

I remember days when hard drives were a "new" copncept, modems were somethign only the programming teacher had, and color CRT monitors were a significant upgrade.

Noob.

I remember days when wheels were a "new" copncept, fire was somethign only the cooking teacher had, and colored fabric was a significant upgrade.

Noob.

I remember the day saw a large  black rectangular object and started killing other chimps with bones and stuff.

Noob.

I remember God mumbling something about creating something new called "dirt".

Noob.

I remember when all of the matter in the universe was condensed into a single, infinitesimally small point of infinite mass.


I've been stuck in an eleven dimensional multiverse for all eternity, so I'm getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2013-02-01 10:20:58 PM

Gortex: Marcus Aurelius: Zarquon's Flat Tire: You know, to a horticulturist, that was damn near gibberish.

If you mean the frequencies and amplitudes that the modems used to communicate, it helps to listen to it slowed down to human speed.

The two machines basically say "hello" and then test the quality of the connection by saturating the analog bandwidth.

It's actually quite beautiful.

That was the second most terrifying thing I've heard all week. The first most was the link on that video taking me to a Justin Bieber song slowed down 800x.


Does anyone still have Jurassic Park slowed down 800x?
 
2013-02-01 10:31:21 PM

Fano: Gortex: Marcus Aurelius: Zarquon's Flat Tire: You know, to a horticulturist, that was damn near gibberish.

If you mean the frequencies and amplitudes that the modems used to communicate, it helps to listen to it slowed down to human speed.

The two machines basically say "hello" and then test the quality of the connection by saturating the analog bandwidth.

It's actually quite beautiful.

That was the second most terrifying thing I've heard all week. The first most was the link on that video taking me to a Justin Bieber song slowed down 800x.

Does anyone still have Jurassic Park slowed down 800x?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-w-58hQ9dLk

ok so not really, but it's still incredible
 
2013-02-01 10:32:49 PM

unyon: Rising Ape: RexTalionis: I'm sorry, but do you not use a modem now to go online?

Indeed you do, unless you're lucky enough to have fibre to the home or in a bizarre enough situation to be still using ISDN.

Can't tell how fast your ADSL modem has connected by listening to the handshake, though.

Actually, If you're on DSL or cable, you don't use a modem.  That term refers to devices that  MOdulate and DEModulate tones over a PSTN.

We just keep calling that device that connects to the outside world a modem, because it's a generally understood term.  But unless you're on dialup, they no longer do what the name implies.


Actually, they all use modems. Just about every form of telecommunications requires some form of modulation and demodulation.

This applies to wireless on your home network as well as many fiber network equipment.
 
2013-02-01 10:35:20 PM
I NEED that as a poster. Farking awesome. I miss those days. There's more to do online now, but stuff is just so...antiseptic.
 
2013-02-01 10:42:38 PM
Booky for when not on mobile.
 
2013-02-01 10:46:44 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-02-01 10:47:25 PM

imgod2u: unyon: Rising Ape: RexTalionis: I'm sorry, but do you not use a modem now to go online?

Indeed you do, unless you're lucky enough to have fibre to the home or in a bizarre enough situation to be still using ISDN.

Can't tell how fast your ADSL modem has connected by listening to the handshake, though.

Actually, If you're on DSL or cable, you don't use a modem.  That term refers to devices that  MOdulate and DEModulate tones over a PSTN.

We just keep calling that device that connects to the outside world a modem, because it's a generally understood term.  But unless you're on dialup, they no longer do what the name implies.

Actually, they all use modems. Just about every form of telecommunications requires some form of modulation and demodulation.

This applies to wireless on your home network as well as many fiber network equipment.


images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-02-01 10:49:25 PM

Marcus Aurelius: Lord Dimwit: Marcus Aurelius: xenomorpheus: very nice graphic, I need to see about making one of these for my company's dial-up network service and our bearer services.  I think my 286 was the first computer I had that I added a modem to so I could scour BBS systems

for you kids out there, BBS was , aw hell go wiki it already

Positive luxury.  I had to solder a pair of Motorola serial I/O chips onto the motherboard of a Commodore 8032 and write my own comm routines in 8 bit assembler to get onto the local BBS.

And we were glad.

I can't remember who said it but I always liked the quote (paraphrased here): "the problem with modern programmers isn't that they can't stuff a device driver into a spare 24 bytes they found in unused scratch memory, but that they won't even try."

There were times when I agonized over less memory than that.  And you're right, a computer geek today has no concept of some of the underlying technologies that are still there, but under so many layers of microcode and OS software that they're invisible.


Moving stuff around in small model programs because everything had to fit in 16k, and paging out blocks of it so you could make a larger program without having to go to large model and rewrite all your memory access routines.

AAAAHHHH. I need a drink.
 
2013-02-01 11:01:46 PM

Hack Patooey: Marcus Aurelius: Lord Dimwit: Marcus Aurelius: xenomorpheus: very nice graphic, I need to see about making one of these for my company's dial-up network service and our bearer services.  I think my 286 was the first computer I had that I added a modem to so I could scour BBS systems

for you kids out there, BBS was , aw hell go wiki it already

Positive luxury.  I had to solder a pair of Motorola serial I/O chips onto the motherboard of a Commodore 8032 and write my own comm routines in 8 bit assembler to get onto the local BBS.

And we were glad.

I can't remember who said it but I always liked the quote (paraphrased here): "the problem with modern programmers isn't that they can't stuff a device driver into a spare 24 bytes they found in unused scratch memory, but that they won't even try."

There were times when I agonized over less memory than that.  And you're right, a computer geek today has no concept of some of the underlying technologies that are still there, but under so many layers of microcode and OS software that they're invisible.

Moving stuff around in small model programs because everything had to fit in 16k, and paging out blocks of it so you could make a larger program without having to go to large model and rewrite all your memory access routines.

AAAAHHHH. I need a drink.


Back in 6502 land, three decades ago, I had a virtualized upper memory 2 KB store system paged out in a 1 KB swap routine into a 5 megabyte hard drive with an 8 bit HPIB interface.  The hardware (on top of the Commodore 8032) cost me nearly $2500, and charged the customer the usual markup.

They didn't bat an eye.
 
2013-02-01 11:19:22 PM

Marcus Aurelius: 8 bit HPIB


They still use that.  Had to buy some for a customer.  $3000 pcb with a 45 year old interconnect...
Me: "hey gais we got like usb, ethernet and stuff nowadays right?"
Engineers:"NO! OUR OSCILLOSCOPES MUST USE INTERCONNECTS OLDER THAN ANYONE WORKING ON THIS PROJECT!"
Me:"okies....."
 
2013-02-01 11:24:50 PM

Marcus Aurelius: styckx: Trumpet Winsock was the bane of my existence.

I HATED that program.  Whatchamacallit TCP/IP came out and kicked their asses in about 1991 if I recall.


TCP/IP came out 30 years ago. Winsock was a Windows protocol module based on the BSD socket model. It allowed easier porting of Unix apps that used sockets for communication. Finally Microsoft got around to properly write its own TCP/IP stack and shipped it with NT in 1994.
 
2013-02-01 11:52:18 PM

PepperFreak: Fano: Gortex: Marcus Aurelius: Zarquon's Flat Tire: You know, to a horticulturist, that was damn near gibberish.

If you mean the frequencies and amplitudes that the modems used to communicate, it helps to listen to it slowed down to human speed.

The two machines basically say "hello" and then test the quality of the connection by saturating the analog bandwidth.

It's actually quite beautiful.

That was the second most terrifying thing I've heard all week. The first most was the link on that video taking me to a Justin Bieber song slowed down 800x.

Does anyone still have Jurassic Park slowed down 800x?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-w-58hQ9dLk

ok so not really, but it's still incredible


http://soundcloud.com/birdfeeder/jurassic-park-theme-1000-slower

Here we go. I favorited the Fark thread on it, but the video got removed at some point.
 
2013-02-02 12:01:23 AM

Marcus Aurelius: imgod2u: unyon: Rising Ape: RexTalionis: I'm sorry, but do you not use a modem now to go online?

Indeed you do, unless you're lucky enough to have fibre to the home or in a bizarre enough situation to be still using ISDN.

Can't tell how fast your ADSL modem has connected by listening to the handshake, though.

Actually, If you're on DSL or cable, you don't use a modem.  That term refers to devices that  MOdulate and DEModulate tones over a PSTN.

We just keep calling that device that connects to the outside world a modem, because it's a generally understood term.  But unless you're on dialup, they no longer do what the name implies.

Actually, they all use modems. Just about every form of telecommunications requires some form of modulation and demodulation.

This applies to wireless on your home network as well as many fiber network equipment.

[images1.wikia.nocookie.net image 290x200]


Other Barry, do you care for unrelated image replies?
 
2013-02-02 12:12:32 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com
Hottest looking modem ever.
 
2013-02-02 12:16:05 AM

Lord Dimwit: Uncle Pooky: I remember when getting a 14,400 baud modem was a significant upgrade.

I remember when getting a 1200 baud modem was a significant upgrade. Get off my lawn. ;)


My first was 300.

/come mow my lawn
 
2013-02-02 12:29:31 AM

Lord Dimwit: Marcus Aurelius: xenomorpheus: very nice graphic, I need to see about making one of these for my company's dial-up network service and our bearer services.  I think my 286 was the first computer I had that I added a modem to so I could scour BBS systems

for you kids out there, BBS was , aw hell go wiki it already

Positive luxury.  I had to solder a pair of Motorola serial I/O chips onto the motherboard of a Commodore 8032 and write my own comm routines in 8 bit assembler to get onto the local BBS.

And we were glad.

I can't remember who said it but I always liked the quote (paraphrased here): "the problem with modern programmers isn't that they can't stuff a device driver into a spare 24 bytes they found in unused scratch memory, but that they won't even try."


Not many programmers know assembly code now. I used to stuff code in the cassette buffer of my C64. Mostly auto loaders and such.
 
2013-02-02 12:43:29 AM

Marcus Aurelius: "You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike"


"You are in a maze of  little twisty passages, all alike"

Yep.
 
2013-02-02 01:05:10 AM
He coulda phreaked it up a bit more and explained the dialing sequence on a DMTF is dual-tone which is why each number dialed produced two distinct signature tones

You could lose a whole row or column and not be able to dial any number that used a number in that row/column.
 
2013-02-02 01:09:06 AM
my first experience with the online world was when some guy brought a mac to our GT class and dialed up the WELL (which was very new then) and showed us around. a few months later most of us had modems (i got a 2400 baud, and nothing much else for xmas that year) and we were all in on the local BBSs.

a few years later this mutant chick and i were hanging out at my squat (you couldn't buy such a nice place for $300000, even in the butthole, texas in which it was located) and i found out that she was the person that i repeatedly beat the hell out of in some BBS game.

good times, good times.

/ that couch was awesome
 
2013-02-02 01:39:55 AM

the801: my first experience with the online world was when some guy brought a mac to our GT class and dialed up the WELL (which was very new then) and showed us around. a few months later most of us had modems (i got a 2400 baud, and nothing much else for xmas that year) and we were all in on the local BBSs.

a few years later this mutant chick and i were hanging out at my squat (you couldn't buy such a nice place for $300000, even in the butthole, texas in which it was located) and i found out that she was the person that i repeatedly beat the hell out of in some BBS game.

good times, good times.

/ that couch was awesome


I miss my old BBS's, Aesopian, Deadly Sins
 
2013-02-02 01:51:02 AM

Mrbogey: He coulda phreaked it up a bit more and explained the dialing sequence on a DMTF is dual-tone which is why each number dialed produced two distinct signature tones

You could lose a whole row or column and not be able to dial any number that used a number in that row/column.


Bonus geekery: There's actually a 4x4 matrix, although the last row was reserved for what was called "in-band signalling", otherwise known as.. um, lemme check the statute of limitations first...
 
2013-02-02 01:54:36 AM
When I was a kid in 1983 or so, my dad and one of his technophile friends both had modems and decided to set up a chat session. I remember the characters struggling to come across. We had a TI-99 4/a. I don't recall the modem or his friend's specs

/CSB
 
2013-02-02 02:15:46 AM

Marcus Aurelius: xenomorpheus: very nice graphic, I need to see about making one of these for my company's dial-up network service and our bearer services.  I think my 286 was the first computer I had that I added a modem to so I could scour BBS systems

for you kids out there, BBS was , aw hell go wiki it already

Positive luxury.  I had to solder a pair of Motorola serial I/O chips onto the motherboard of a Commodore 8032 and write my own comm routines in 8 bit assembler to get onto the local BBS.

And we were glad.


img.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-02 02:28:50 AM

Fish in a Barrel: jtown: It didn't take all night.  More like 5-10 minutes for a high res (640x480) GIF.  And that was back in the 2400bps days.

Those "high resolution" JPEGs were a killer, though.  It took long enough that I could finish fapping to the Persian Kitty purrfect pose of the week before anything actually interesting showed up on the screen.


I remember some images taking up to 20 minutes.. and they were GIFs.  The first JPEG I had took about 10 minutes for my 286 to render down to 256 colors for display on my screen..
 
2013-02-02 04:12:58 AM

HMS_Blinkin: Zombalupagus: xenomorpheus: MrEricSir: Mikey1969: 300baud: Uncle Pooky: I remember when getting a 14,400 baud modem was a significant upgrade.

Noob.

I remember days when hard drives were a "new" copncept, modems were somethign only the programming teacher had, and color CRT monitors were a significant upgrade.

Noob.

I remember days when wheels were a "new" copncept, fire was somethign only the cooking teacher had, and colored fabric was a significant upgrade.

Noob.

I remember the day saw a large  black rectangular object and started killing other chimps with bones and stuff.

Noob.

I remember God mumbling something about creating something new called "dirt".

Noob.

I remember when all of the matter in the universe was condensed into a single, infinitesimally small point of infinite mass.


Noob...

i.imm.io
 
2013-02-02 05:50:39 AM
imgs.xkcd.com
So very very true..
 
2013-02-02 07:21:10 AM
Actually, my first modem and BBS habit probably made me the fittest I've ever been.

'Oh well, 20-30 minute wait for it to finish, can't use the computer for anything else.. guess I'll use this weight bench here in the meantime..'
 
2013-02-02 09:43:21 AM

Fano: t

I miss my old BBS's, Aesopian, Deadly Sins


Toronto BBSs I used to hang out on:
Moonshine Runners
The Prison Mistress
Conan's Den

Hamilton BBSs:
Nihilist Glee Club
The Tavern
Creative Arts Base
Zaphod's Playground

There were others too but I can no longer remember the names.
 
2013-02-02 09:50:18 AM
ATH1
I currently use the handshake as my cell's ring tones
ATH0
 
2013-02-02 09:58:12 AM
Thank you porn.
 
2013-02-02 09:58:34 AM
Met my wife on a BBS, so getting a kick....
 
2013-02-02 10:54:48 AM

MisterTweak: Bonus geekery: There's actually a 4x4 matrix, although the last row was reserved for what was called "in-band signalling", otherwise known as.. um, lemme check the statute of limitations first...


Yup. They don't teach this stuff any more and the phone network has changed enough to secure against end-users doing prohibited things. There's a lot of stuff people could do to "mess" with the phone network but it would take a bit more work and get you a plane ticket to Gitmo.

You can still get a free nightlight though.
 
2013-02-02 10:58:56 AM

Mrbogey: MisterTweak: Bonus geekery: There's actually a 4x4 matrix, although the last row was reserved for what was called "in-band signalling", otherwise known as.. um, lemme check the statute of limitations first...

Yup. They don't teach this stuff any more and the phone network has changed enough to secure against end-users doing prohibited things. There's a lot of stuff people could do to "mess" with the phone network but it would take a bit more work and get you a plane ticket to Gitmo.

You can still get a free nightlight though.


And I just noticed that I typoed DTMF (dialtone motherfarker)(actually dual tone multi-freq).
 
2013-02-02 11:37:00 AM

Ivo Shandor: Ah, the good old days when you could put '+++ATH' in your signature and figure out who had bought the cheap modems.

Fun fact - the Hayes command set never went away, it just evolved into GSM. If your cell phone lets you talk directly to the baseband chipset (e.g. Nokia N900) you can dial a number or send a text message with AT commands.


As someone that worked at Hayes for 13+ years, I support this sentiment ;)
 
2013-02-02 11:46:10 AM
Mrbogey:
And I just noticed that I typoed DTMF (dialtone motherfarker)(actually dual tone multi-freq).

Oh my god, that is exactly how I remembered that acronym!
 
2013-02-02 12:29:35 PM
Trade Wars anyone?
 
2013-02-02 12:31:38 PM

Ghastly: [www.mailsend-online.com image 400x235]

My first modem. Came with a rotary dial phone which I still have. Also had 2 hours of free COMPUSERVE!


OK Ghast, as far as I'm concerned, you win the "off my lawn" prize for this thread.  I had utterly and completel;y forgot about those.

Wow, and her I thought I was old school with my 8088 machine w/ a1200 baud in HS!
 
2013-02-02 01:11:01 PM

Dragonflew: Mrbogey:
And I just noticed that I typoed DTMF (dialtone motherfarker)(actually dual tone multi-freq).

Oh my god, that is exactly how I remembered that acronym!


The mnemonics tend to get handed down generation to generation. Alas, the heyday of dial-up ended as I came to be. My earliest modem was a 1200 baud modem. I didn't have any friends who passed along any BBS's to me as I grew up the only geek in my circle so the modem was seldom used.
 
2013-02-02 01:39:02 PM
At first I thought that would make a good screen background. Then, after looking at it for a while I thought no, it wouldn't.
 
2013-02-02 01:51:19 PM

Mrbogey: Dragonflew: Mrbogey:
And I just noticed that I typoed DTMF (dialtone motherfarker)(actually dual tone multi-freq).

Oh my god, that is exactly how I remembered that acronym!

The mnemonics tend to get handed down generation to generation. Alas, the heyday of dial-up ended as I came to be. My earliest modem was a 1200 baud modem. I didn't have any friends who passed along any BBS's to me as I grew up the only geek in my circle so the modem was seldom used.


My first was a 1200 as well, connected to a C64 with an ANSI emulator.  I thought I came up with Dialtone Motherfarker myself, but I guess it's the obvious choice. No one passed it down to me.
 
2013-02-02 02:40:28 PM

Marcus Aurelius: Lord Dimwit: Marcus Aurelius: xenomorpheus: very nice graphic, I need to see about making one of these for my company's dial-up network service and our bearer services.  I think my 286 was the first computer I had that I added a modem to so I could scour BBS systems

for you kids out there, BBS was , aw hell go wiki it already

Positive luxury.  I had to solder a pair of Motorola serial I/O chips onto the motherboard of a Commodore 8032 and write my own comm routines in 8 bit assembler to get onto the local BBS.

And we were glad.

I can't remember who said it but I always liked the quote (paraphrased here): "the problem with modern programmers isn't that they can't stuff a device driver into a spare 24 bytes they found in unused scratch memory, but that they won't even try."

There were times when I agonized over less memory than that.  And you're right, a computer geek today has no concept of some of the underlying technologies that are still there, but under so many layers of microcode and OS software that they're invisible.


Trust me, I'm aware. It still was amazing to me when I learned what tar (the linux command) stood for- tape archive. Because people still use tapes today...
I really want to get into OS development...
 
2013-02-02 02:45:42 PM

imgod2u: unyon: Rising Ape: RexTalionis: I'm sorry, but do you not use a modem now to go online?

Indeed you do, unless you're lucky enough to have fibre to the home or in a bizarre enough situation to be still using ISDN.

Can't tell how fast your ADSL modem has connected by listening to the handshake, though.

Actually, If you're on DSL or cable, you don't use a modem.  That term refers to devices that  MOdulate and DEModulate tones over a PSTN.

We just keep calling that device that connects to the outside world a modem, because it's a generally understood term.  But unless you're on dialup, they no longer do what the name implies.

Actually, they all use modems. Just about every form of telecommunications requires some form of modulation and demodulation.

This applies to wireless on your home network as well as many fiber network equipment.


I wish I knew more about how Cable actually works. Anyone have good documentation?
 
2013-02-02 10:58:12 PM

Rockstone: Marcus Aurelius: Lord Dimwit: Marcus Aurelius: xenomorpheus: very nice graphic, I need to see about making one of these for my company's dial-up network service and our bearer services.  I think my 286 was the first computer I had that I added a modem to so I could scour BBS systems

for you kids out there, BBS was , aw hell go wiki it already

Positive luxury.  I had to solder a pair of Motorola serial I/O chips onto the motherboard of a Commodore 8032 and write my own comm routines in 8 bit assembler to get onto the local BBS.

And we were glad.

I can't remember who said it but I always liked the quote (paraphrased here): "the problem with modern programmers isn't that they can't stuff a device driver into a spare 24 bytes they found in unused scratch memory, but that they won't even try."

There were times when I agonized over less memory than that.  And you're right, a computer geek today has no concept of some of the underlying technologies that are still there, but under so many layers of microcode and OS software that they're invisible.

Trust me, I'm aware. It still was amazing to me when I learned what tar (the linux command) stood for- tape archive. Because people still use tapes today...
I really want to get into OS development...


Just wait until you find out why the "interactive delete" command in Unix was for a long time named "dsw".
 
2013-02-03 12:10:54 AM

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: 300baud: Mikey1969: 300baud: Uncle Pooky: I remember when getting a 14,400 baud modem was a significant upgrade.

Noob.

I remember days when hard drives were a "new" copncept, modems were somethign only the programming teacher had, and color CRT monitors were a significant upgrade.

Noob.  I remember moving up from punch cards and saving programs on magnetic tape three or more times, because it was very likely you wouldn't be able to restore.  All upper case character sets.  Memory measured in bytes.  My first modem was an acoustic coupler; I think it was 150 baud though it may have been 110, I'm ashamed I can't remember.

Back in MYYYYY DAYYYY we didn't have no fancy MOOOO-DEMMMS and we had to make all the noises over the phone ourselves.


Using a 2600-Hz whistle, I suppose?
 
2013-02-03 12:13:46 AM

Rockstone: imgod2u: unyon: Rising Ape: RexTalionis: I'm sorry, but do you not use a modem now to go online?

Indeed you do, unless you're lucky enough to have fibre to the home or in a bizarre enough situation to be still using ISDN.

Can't tell how fast your ADSL modem has connected by listening to the handshake, though.

Actually, If you're on DSL or cable, you don't use a modem.  That term refers to devices that  MOdulate and DEModulate tones over a PSTN.

We just keep calling that device that connects to the outside world a modem, because it's a generally understood term.  But unless you're on dialup, they no longer do what the name implies.

Actually, they all use modems. Just about every form of telecommunications requires some form of modulation and demodulation.

This applies to wireless on your home network as well as many fiber network equipment.

I wish I knew more about how Cable actually works. Anyone have good documentation?


Essentially similar to most wireless communications -- multi-level QAM. DOCSIS will be the most interesting as it moves to wide channel OFDM like LTE in North America.
 
2013-02-03 12:13:31 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: unyon: Actually, If you're on DSL or cable, you don't use a modem. That term refers to devices that MOdulate and DEModulate tones over a PSTN.

We just keep calling that device that connects to the outside world a modem, because it's a generally understood term. But unless you're on dialup, they no longer do what the name implies.

Sorry, they do exactly what the name implies. That's why we call them that. Just like I call you a dumbass, not because it's implied, but because you are. Aren't you a pretty feverish Space Nutter too? That would explain your limited grasp on high school level fundamentals.


I stand corrected- I had presumed that connectivity was fully digital these days, But it does indeed mod/demod the digital data onto an RF carrier.

I have no idea what you mean by space nutter, so I presume you're thinking of someone else.  The only thing that I've extracted from this exchange, other than being corrected, is that I've had to adjust my opinion of you from intelligent nice guy to condescending prick.

So there's that.
 
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