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(Humans Invent)   In the next 20 years we could find out if there is life on other planets   (humansinvent.com) divider line 55
    More: Cool, aviation fuel, mangoes, life on other planets  
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4272 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Feb 2013 at 10:59 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-02 12:49:39 AM
isn't it obvious that there's life on other planets? i mean, there's just about 2^amillion of them out there, give or take. and life doesn't always have to look like us, and be all carbon based oxygen consuming monkeys. there's decent odds that there is or has been some sort of life (maybe not sentient and all) in our solar system, not counting our planet. send a huge crew of scientists to europa and see what's been going on there in the last hundreds of millions of years.

but yeah, hundreds of millions of stars in our galaxy, hundreds of millions of galaxies out there and ours is medium-sized, plus all of the mysterious stuff that we don't understand about the universe... kinda silly to believe that ours is the only planet that developed 'life'.

/ don't worry, christians, jesus appeared on every one of those life-bearing planets to give them the Good News. all 100 billion of them.
 
2013-02-02 02:04:06 AM

the801: isn't it obvious that there's life on other planets? i mean, there's just about 2^amillion of them out there, give or take. and life doesn't always have to look like us, and be all carbon based oxygen consuming monkeys. there's decent odds that there is or has been some sort of life (maybe not sentient and all) in our solar system, not counting our planet. send a huge crew of scientists to europa and see what's been going on there in the last hundreds of millions of years.

but yeah, hundreds of millions of stars in our galaxy, hundreds of millions of galaxies out there and ours is medium-sized, plus all of the mysterious stuff that we don't understand about the universe... kinda silly to believe that ours is the only planet that developed 'life'.

/ don't worry, christians, jesus appeared on every one of those life-bearing planets to give them the Good News. all 100 billion of them.


You don't have to be Christian to think everyone else rolled snake eyes. There may be pond scum on other planets, but humanity ain't ever talking to another people.


/forever alone
//the only thing I can agree with QA on
 
2013-02-02 04:49:49 AM

indarwinsshadow: There's little evidence there is or would be a bipedal tool using species anywhere. Think of the number of creatures just on this planet that are truly bipedal and are tool users. There's just one. We and our direct ancestors are it. There isn't any others. And that's in 4.5 billion years of the planets complex existence. I don't discount life. I'm a 100% positive there's both life and complex life in the universe. Just nothing like us.


You have a funny view of probability, my friend.  There are most likely billions of habitable worlds in our galaxy alone. There are at least 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe.  There are a limited number of forms life could realistically take.  The chances that something, somewhere out there looks like us is staggeringly high.

There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.

Actually, given that a finite number of particles can only take a finite number of relative positions, if the universe is big enough, it's a mathematical certainty that someone exactly like you (with literally all of your memories, experiences, etc.) exists somewhere else.  You'd just have to travel on the order of 10^10^29 meters to meet him.

Sasquach: Every time I hear the "space is just so vast, we'll never visit anywhere" argument, something in me just screams "NO!".


You may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that' just peanuts to space.

Honestly, we're probably at or near our technological peak right now, thermodynamically speaking.  Humans probably won't exist in great number for more than another few centuries.

AdolfOliverPanties: If Einstein is correct, we are farked.  We simply do not have the energy needed to travel at anything approaching light speed and the absolute nearest star system to us would take us four years to get there traveling at light speed.  I too am disappointed in this, but it is fact at this point.


Only from an observer's point of view on earth.  Travelling at arbitrarily close to light speed, the journey would be subjectively instantaneous.  (Not that this speed is remotely possible to achieve... I'm just clarifying the physics.)

Of course, if you add in the time it would take to accelerate without squashing you like a bug, it's a little different.  At a sustained (and rather uncomfortable) 4 Gs up to light speed, and a corresponding deceleration, the trip would take about 6 months of subjective time.

The Snow Dog: I think you are wrong. You think I'm wrong. Can either of us prove we're right? No.

Stalemate.


This guy would like a word:

web.mit.edu
 
2013-02-02 12:52:52 PM

The Snow Dog: Is a per-hensile like a henway?


Q: What's a henway?
A: About 4 to 6 pounds.

i1136.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-02 11:34:00 PM
i could tell you the answer right now
if you're in a hurry


/doesn't take a rocket scientist
 
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