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(Humans Invent)   In the next 20 years we could find out if there is life on other planets   (humansinvent.com) divider line 55
    More: Cool, aviation fuel, mangoes, life on other planets  
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4274 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Feb 2013 at 10:59 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-01 11:00:48 AM
In the next 20 years we could find out if there is life on other planets

Or we might not
 
2013-02-01 11:08:34 AM
In the next <integer> <timeunit>s <event> {might|might not} happen.

There you humansinvent.com, enough articles to cover the next <integer> <timeunits>s
 
2013-02-01 11:09:10 AM
there you -> there you go
 
2013-02-01 11:09:45 AM
We still can't answer that question because we can't get direct evidence of whether there's a biosphere of these other planets but I hope that in the next 20 years or so we will be able to answer this question more definitely in one of two ways: either we will be able to find some evidence that there is life elsewhere by astronomical observations or, through advances in biochemistry, have a better idea of how life began here on earth because that is a problem which still perplexes all biologists.

Yeah, totally what he said
 
2013-02-01 11:16:52 AM
Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.
 
2013-02-01 11:19:15 AM
I'd love for us to find life on other planets. If we could get scared of them, it would help unite the Earth as one.

Sort of a "dirty" solution, but whatever works.
 
2013-02-01 11:35:32 AM
FTA:  is their extraterrestrial life out there, are their other universes and what came before the Big Bang?


Saw this, closed window.  Nobody who writes like this should be telling us about science.
 
2013-02-01 11:38:24 AM
i50.tinypic.com
 
2013-02-01 12:05:19 PM
Hosted by geocities
 
2013-02-01 12:08:29 PM
Or we can just wait until they arrive and say....."Hi food source" we are here to eat you
 
2013-02-01 12:13:33 PM

LasersHurt: I'd love for us to find life on other planets. If we could get scared of them, it would help unite the Earth as one.

Sort of a "dirty" solution, but whatever works.


Never get a second chance to make a first impression. I'd rather not the human race hit the intergalactic scene like a mean drunk guy trying to start a fight at a wedding.
 
2013-02-01 12:16:31 PM

J. Frank Parnell: LasersHurt: I'd love for us to find life on other planets. If we could get scared of them, it would help unite the Earth as one.

Sort of a "dirty" solution, but whatever works.

Never get a second chance to make a first impression. I'd rather not the human race hit the intergalactic scene like a mean drunk guy trying to start a fight at a wedding.


Well I am assuming that there would be a long lead-time between DETECTING life, and actually meeting it. I figure the detection will make us get our shiat in gear, and by the time we make contact maybe we can act like adults.

Maybe.
 
2013-02-01 12:26:17 PM
the chances are slimmer than the universe is big... i say no.
 
2013-02-01 12:29:10 PM

TheAlgebraist: In the next <integer> <timeunit>s <event> {might|might not} happen.

There you humansinvent.com, enough articles to cover the next <integer> <timeunits>s


Holy crap that is brilliant.

/well done, sir.
 
2013-02-01 12:38:25 PM

LasersHurt: Well I am assuming that there would be a long lead-time between DETECTING life, and actually meeting it. I figure the detection will make us get our shiat in gear, and by the time we make contact maybe we can act like adults.


Well, the reason people keep putting forward the idea of an alien threat unifying all humans is because it would mean even more tax dollars going into military projects. What's really dividing us is greed, and war is probably the biggest moneymaker. Without those profits driving everything we might already be unified.

I suggest we instead get rid of the sociopaths who turn people and countries against eachother for their own gain, instead of letting them plan our future in space.
 
2013-02-01 01:04:08 PM

J. Frank Parnell: LasersHurt: Well I am assuming that there would be a long lead-time between DETECTING life, and actually meeting it. I figure the detection will make us get our shiat in gear, and by the time we make contact maybe we can act like adults.

Well, the reason people keep putting forward the idea of an alien threat unifying all humans is because it would mean even more tax dollars going into military projects. What's really dividing us is greed, and war is probably the biggest moneymaker. Without those profits driving everything we might already be unified.

I suggest we instead get rid of the sociopaths who turn people and countries against eachother for their own gain, instead of letting them plan our future in space.


Any optimism that an alien threat would cause humanity to unite ignores that humanity would probably split into pro-alien and anti-alien factions, even if the aliens were brutal overlords that used humans for food.

We have the concept of  "Better to reign in Hell than to serve in Heaven" for a reason, and it isn't just Milton's fault
 
2013-02-01 01:15:05 PM
No
 
2013-02-01 01:20:07 PM

indarwinsshadow: Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.


I disagree with at least two of your sentences.  I bolded them.

EXACTLY like us?  You may be right.  But given the chemicals and elements present in the universe and given the estimated number of habitable planets in our galaxy alone, I;d say the odds are in favor of intelligent life, possibly humanoid.

It was estimated in May 2012 that there are BILLIONS of habitable planets in the Milky Way galaxy alone.  And that galaxy is one of an estimated 100 billion galaxies in the known universe.  This extrapolates into a VERY conservative estimate of 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 habitable planets in the known universe.  That number is between a quintillion and a sextillion.

So the odds are definitely not zero.  They are probably incredibly high, but we will probably never get to see it even if we lived a dozen lifetimes, so vast is space.
 
2013-02-01 01:27:14 PM
Maybe, in the next twenty years or so, Humans Invent can come up with a web site that displays properly without Javascript.
 
2013-02-01 01:32:33 PM

meat0918: Any optimism that an alien threat would cause humanity to unite ignores that humanity would probably split into pro-alien and anti-alien factions, even if the aliens were brutal overlords that used humans for food.


Not to mention those who'd accept them as gods, and those who'd think they are devils.

Funny how we generalize so easily. When talking about meeting an alien race, they all have to be good or evil.
 
2013-02-01 01:36:05 PM

J. Frank Parnell: meat0918: Any optimism that an alien threat would cause humanity to unite ignores that humanity would probably split into pro-alien and anti-alien factions, even if the aliens were brutal overlords that used humans for food.

Not to mention those who'd accept them as gods, and those who'd think they are devils.

Funny how we generalize so easily. When talking about meeting an alien race, they all have to be good or evil.


Not funny so much as a sad comment on how we demand much of our entertainment conform to black and white simplicity.
 
2013-02-01 01:40:54 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: indarwinsshadow: Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.

I disagree with at least two of your sentences.  I bolded them.

EXACTLY like us?  You may be right.  But given the chemicals and elements present in the universe and given the estimated number of habitable planets in our galaxy alone, I;d say the odds are in favor of intelligent life, possibly humanoid.

It was estimated in May 2012 that there are BILLIONS of habitable planets in the Milky Way galaxy alone.  And that galaxy is one of an estimated 100 billion galaxies in the known universe.  This extrapolates into a VERY conservative estimate of 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 habitable planets in the known universe.  That number is between a quintillion and a sextillion.

So the odds are definitely not zero.  They are probably incredibly high, but we will probably never get to see it even if we lived a dozen lifetimes, so vast is space.



Every time I hear the "space is just so vast, we'll never visit anywhere" argument, something in me just screams "NO!". I refuse to believe that this is just about it...our society will advance, we'll build nifty space ships, go to and build colonies on the Moon and Mars...but never go beyond. This is it, our ultimate ending point is in sight. I know the universe isn't about fulfilling what we would like, but there is just something so thoroughly unsatisfying about the idea that we're a tiny fish in a tiny bowl amongst 1 X 10^x tiny bowls.

We know so little about the universe as it is...we can't accurately describe where the vast majority of its mass and energy are....I choose to hold out for the idea that once we really have a good handle on things, we'll expand out beyond our little outpost.

/it's Friday
//I'm terribly sleep deprived
///physics lab after work
 
2013-02-01 01:47:15 PM
There's almost certainly life elsewhere in the universe, but the probability that humanity will ever have any kind of meaningful contact with them is almost nonexistent.
 
2013-02-01 01:54:19 PM

Sasquach: Every time I hear the "space is just so vast, we'll never visit anywhere" argument, something in me just screams "NO!". I refuse to believe that this is just about it...our society will advance, we'll build nifty space ships, go to and build colonies on the Moon and Mars...but never go beyond. This is it, our ultimate ending point is in sight. I know the universe isn't about fulfilling what we would like, but there is just something so thoroughly unsatisfying about the idea that we're a tiny fish in a tiny bowl amongst 1 X 10^x tiny bowls.


If Einstein is correct, we are farked.  We simply do not have the energy needed to travel at anything approaching light speed and the absolute nearest star system to us would take us four years to get there traveling at light speed.  I too am disappointed in this, but it is fact at this point.

Our progeny may one day get there but we certainly won't, barring intervention by some race that has already figured this out.  Sadly, I believe the odds of such a species or race coming here are eclipsed by the odds that they would have extinguished themselves (the direction we seem to be headed) long before they had a chance to expand very far into space.
 
2013-02-01 02:09:04 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Sasquach: Every time I hear the "space is just so vast, we'll never visit anywhere" argument, something in me just screams "NO!". I refuse to believe that this is just about it...our society will advance, we'll build nifty space ships, go to and build colonies on the Moon and Mars...but never go beyond. This is it, our ultimate ending point is in sight. I know the universe isn't about fulfilling what we would like, but there is just something so thoroughly unsatisfying about the idea that we're a tiny fish in a tiny bowl amongst 1 X 10^x tiny bowls.

If Einstein is correct, we are farked.  We simply do not have the energy needed to travel at anything approaching light speed and the absolute nearest star system to us would take us four years to get there traveling at light speed.  I too am disappointed in this, but it is fact at this point.

Our progeny may one day get there but we certainly won't, barring intervention by some race that has already figured this out.  Sadly, I believe the odds of such a species or race coming here are eclipsed by the odds that they would have extinguished themselves (the direction we seem to be headed) long before they had a chance to expand very far into space.


The key is to make the time traveled trivial in some fashion.  Since we apparently cannot travel faster, thus shortening the time, then the key is living longer.  Some sort of stasis perhaps or, better yet, practical immortality either through bioengineering or cybernetics or nanotechnology or whatever, which are all still science fiction, but well within the physical laws, and practically on the horizon.
 
2013-02-01 02:10:37 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: indarwinsshadow: Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.

I disagree with at least two of your sentences.  I bolded them.

EXACTLY like us?  You may be right.  But given the chemicals and elements present in the universe and given the estimated number of habitable planets in our galaxy alone, I;d say the odds are in favor of intelligent life, possibly humanoid.

It was estimated in May 2012 that there are BILLIONS of habitable planets in the Milky Way galaxy alone.  And that galaxy is one of an estimated 100 billion galaxies in the known universe.  This extrapolates into a VERY conservative estimate of 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 habitable planets in the known universe.  That number is between a quintillion and a sextillion.

So the odds are definitely not zero.  They are probably incredibly high, but we will probably never get to see it even if we lived a dozen lifetimes, so vast is space.


There's little evidence there is or would be a bipedal tool using species anywhere. Think of the number of creatures just on this planet that are truly bipedal and are tool users. There's just one. We and our direct ancestors are it. There isn't any others. And that's in 4.5 billion years of the planets complex existence. I don't discount life. I'm a 100% positive there's both life and complex life in the universe. Just nothing like us.
 
2013-02-01 02:25:55 PM
It would idiotic to assume there ISN'T. That mentality is a product of religious asshattery.
 
2013-02-01 02:33:38 PM

indarwinsshadow: There's little evidence there is or would be a bipedal tool using species anywhere. Think of the number of creatures just on this planet that are truly bipedal and are tool users. There's just one. We and our direct ancestors are it. There isn't any others. And that's in 4.5 billion years of the planets complex existence. I don't discount life. I'm a 100% positive there's both life and complex life in the universe. Just nothing like us.


Wouldn't the lower species simply evolve?  Surely someone with your username believes such a thing could happen.  Bear in mind that we are a young galaxy, a young planet and a young species, universally speaking.  How about the hypothesis that our kind of life evolved here because they basic building blocks of it came from out there?  Were we the only planet to receive those materials in all that time?  I doubt it.
 
2013-02-01 02:49:44 PM

indarwinsshadow: AdolfOliverPanties: indarwinsshadow: Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.

I disagree with at least two of your sentences.  I bolded them.

EXACTLY like us?  You may be right.  But given the chemicals and elements present in the universe and given the estimated number of habitable planets in our galaxy alone, I;d say the odds are in favor of intelligent life, possibly humanoid.

It was estimated in May 2012 that there are BILLIONS of habitable planets in the Milky Way galaxy alone.  And that galaxy is one of an estimated 100 billion galaxies in the known universe.  This extrapolates into a VERY conservative estimate of 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 habitable planets in the known universe.  That number is between a quintillion and a sextillion.

So the odds are definitely not zero.  They are probably incredibly high, but we will probably never get to see it even if we lived a dozen lifetimes, so vast is space.

There's little evidence there is or would be a bipedal tool using species anywhere. Think of the number of creatures just on this planet that are truly bipedal and are tool users. There's just one. We and our direct ancestors are it. There isn't any others. And that's in 4.5 billion years of the planets complex existence. I don't discount life. I'm a 100% positive there's both life and complex life in the universe. Just nothing like us.


I would actually expect large, complex life on other Earth-like planets to be reasonably similar to life on Earth.  For instance, I would expect the majority of large, heavy, mobile land bound species to be quadrupeds.  Why?  Because it strikes a fine balance between stability, speed, and the energy needed to grow appendages capable of supporting reasonable weight.  Tripeds, like bipeds, would be inherently unstable, and any number of legs greater than four are superfluous for stability and require additional energy to grow and support their function.  Could have one large foot, kinda like a slug, but that's slow.  Therefore, I would also expect the majority of tool using, intelligent land bound species to be quadrupedal, with some sort of prehensile appendage like an elephant's trunk, or bipedal, having evolved from a quadruped to free up two legs for prehensile use.

Of course, once you throw intelligent tool using oceanic species into the mix, then it's a lot harder to predict.

Basically, since energy consumption would be a universal concern for life everywhere, one would expect that under similar conditions you would have life using similar simple solutions (the ones which give the most benefit for the least energy) to similar problems faced in those conditions, though one would also expect every potential solution to be tried eventually given enough examples, but there are limited solutions to those problems.
 
2013-02-01 03:38:12 PM
i1136.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-01 03:43:18 PM
Ripley is NOT amused

www.picanese.com
 
2013-02-01 04:02:53 PM

Sasquach: AdolfOliverPanties: indarwinsshadow: Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.

I disagree with at least two of your sentences.  I bolded them.

EXACTLY like us?  You may be right.  But given the chemicals and elements present in the universe and given the estimated number of habitable planets in our galaxy alone, I;d say the odds are in favor of intelligent life, possibly humanoid.

It was estimated in May 2012 that there are BILLIONS of habitable planets in the Milky Way galaxy alone.  And that galaxy is one of an estimated 100 billion galaxies in the known universe.  This extrapolates into a VERY conservative estimate of 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 habitable planets in the known universe.  That number is between a quintillion and a sextillion.

So the odds are definitely not zero.  They are probably incredibly high, but we will probably never get to see it even if we lived a dozen lifetimes, so vast is space.


Every time I hear the "space is just so vast, we'll never visit anywhere" argument, something in me just screams "NO!". I refuse to believe that this is just about it...our society will advance, we'll build nifty space ships, go to and build colonies on the Moon and Mars...but never go beyond. This is it, our ultimate ending point is in sight. I know the universe isn't about fulfilling what we would like, but there is just something so thoroughly unsatisfying about the idea that we're a tiny fish in a tiny bowl amongst 1 X 10^x tiny bowls.

We know so little about the universe as it is...we can't accurately describe where the vast majority of its mass and energy are....I choose to hold out for the idea that once we really have a good handle on things, ...


Don't fret.  People on Earth may never see it.  People in the space ships themselves will find that time dilation is their friend.  If you are willing to abandon every single thing you know on Earth there are a huge number of systems that can be reached within the human lifespan.
 
2013-02-01 04:26:04 PM
www.zeroidz.com
 
2013-02-01 04:30:58 PM
In 100 years we've gone from driving a car around to driving a car around Mars.

There is no such thing as impossible. There is only not possible yet.

( Why yes, I am watching TNG )
 
2013-02-01 04:54:20 PM
 Things are only impossible until they're not, is what I was going for.
 
2013-02-01 06:12:30 PM

State_College_Arsonist: Maybe, in the next twenty years or so, Humans Invent can come up with a web site that displays properly without Javascript.


Woah woah woah....you can have a webpage display text without using Javascript now? When did this happen?
 
2013-02-01 06:29:54 PM
The anomaly is bigger in the pahst. It's bigger in the pahst, Will!
 
2013-02-01 07:27:32 PM
We might find out the terrible secret of space.
 
2013-02-01 08:02:10 PM
People that think there "must" be life on a planet anywhere near us have a poor grasp on how large the universe is.
 
2013-02-01 08:17:46 PM
So in the next 20 years we will have the technology to view EVERY planet in all of space?  Because that's how you're going to prove there are no other life forms out there.
 
2013-02-01 08:21:39 PM

meat0918: J. Frank Parnell: meat0918: Any optimism that an alien threat would cause humanity to unite ignores that humanity would probably split into pro-alien and anti-alien factions, even if the aliens were brutal overlords that used humans for food.

Not to mention those who'd accept them as gods, and those who'd think they are devils.

Funny how we generalize so easily. When talking about meeting an alien race, they all have to be good or evil.

Not funny so much as a sad comment on how we demand much of our entertainment conform to black and white simplicity.


Have you two not considered the possibility of, "Meh. Aliens? Here? I just hope they don't ruin my show with some stupid 'announcement' or something"?
 
2013-02-01 09:00:48 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Sasquach: Every time I hear the "space is just so vast, we'll never visit anywhere" argument, something in me just screams "NO!". I refuse to believe that this is just about it...our society will advance, we'll build nifty space ships, go to and build colonies on the Moon and Mars...but never go beyond. This is it, our ultimate ending point is in sight. I know the universe isn't about fulfilling what we would like, but there is just something so thoroughly unsatisfying about the idea that we're a tiny fish in a tiny bowl amongst 1 X 10^x tiny bowls.

If Einstein is correct, we are farked.  We simply do not have the energy needed to travel at anything approaching light speed and the absolute nearest star system to us would take us four years to get there traveling at light speed.  I too am disappointed in this, but it is fact at this point.

Our progeny may one day get there but we certainly won't, barring intervention by some race that has already figured this out.  Sadly, I believe the odds of such a species or race coming here are eclipsed by the odds that they would have extinguished themselves (the direction we seem to be headed) long before they had a chance to expand very far into space.


Unless the fabric of space time changes or magic starts existing, humanity is FOREVER ALONE.
 
2013-02-01 09:16:53 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: If Einstein is correct, we are farked.  We simply do not have the energy needed to travel at anything approaching light speed and the absolute nearest star system to us would take us four years to get there traveling at light speed.


Not from the perspective of the travelers.
To the traveler, travelling any distance at light speed takes no time at all.
(not possible unless you have no mass of course)

/No mas
 
2013-02-01 09:49:44 PM
Or we might keep wondering forever.
 
2013-02-01 10:47:10 PM

Now That's What I Call a Taco!: People that think there "must" be life on a planet anywhere near us have a poor grasp on how large the universe is.


You might think it's a long way down to the chemists, but that peanuts compared to space!
 
2013-02-01 11:52:10 PM
Save yourself the needless anticipation: there is.
 
2013-02-01 11:53:47 PM

indarwinsshadow: Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.


Wrong.
 
2013-02-01 11:57:49 PM

indarwinsshadow: Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.


Also: What the fark is a per-hensile club swinger? Is that a place where you and your life-partner go to swap partners with other per-hensiles? What is a per-hensile?
 
2013-02-01 11:58:46 PM
Is a per-hensile like a henway?
 
2013-02-02 12:03:07 AM

indarwinsshadow: AdolfOliverPanties: indarwinsshadow: Of course there's life on other planets. It'd be almost impossible if there wasn't. There's just nothing like us anywhere else in the entire universe. I doubt there's ever been anything like us, ever. Think of all the unique things that happened to make the bipedal big brained per-hensile club swinger. The odds of that ever happening again are zero.

I disagree with at least two of your sentences.  I bolded them.

EXACTLY like us?  You may be right.  But given the chemicals and elements present in the universe and given the estimated number of habitable planets in our galaxy alone, I;d say the odds are in favor of intelligent life, possibly humanoid.

It was estimated in May 2012 that there are BILLIONS of habitable planets in the Milky Way galaxy alone.  And that galaxy is one of an estimated 100 billion galaxies in the known universe.  This extrapolates into a VERY conservative estimate of 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 habitable planets in the known universe.  That number is between a quintillion and a sextillion.

So the odds are definitely not zero.  They are probably incredibly high, but we will probably never get to see it even if we lived a dozen lifetimes, so vast is space.

There's little evidence there is or would be a bipedal tool using species anywhere. Think of the number of creatures just on this planet that are truly bipedal and are tool users. There's just one. We and our direct ancestors are it. There isn't any others. And that's in 4.5 billion years of the planets complex existence. I don't discount life. I'm a 100% positive there's both life and complex life in the universe. Just nothing like us.


I think you are wrong. You think I'm wrong. Can either of us prove we're right? No.

Stalemate.
 
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