If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Consumerist)   So, how far off were the technological predictions of 1967′s Home Of The Future? (w/video)   (consumerist.com) divider line 33
    More: Followup, Ryan Leaf, predictions, Walter Cronkite  
•       •       •

4794 clicks; posted to Geek » on 31 Jan 2013 at 10:52 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-01-31 10:06:12 AM
I want my flying car dammit!

/Oh yeah, and the sex robot.
//In fact, forget the flying car.
 
2013-01-31 10:43:07 AM
"When I've finished eating, there will be no dishes to wash," explains the venerated newsman. "The used plates will be melted down again, the leftovers destroyed in the process and the melted plastic will be ready to be molded into clean plates when I need them next."

While this is not currently feasible for every day use, the elements of 3-d printing that we have now could certainly make it possible, although I am not sure what is gained by washing the dishes and then melting them down again and recreating stuff, other than I guess you could make a bowl for breakfast cereal in the morning and then have it make a plate for lunch or dinner later on, and you don't have to have them in the cabinet, and would all be made out of the same plastic.  Considering the plastic would need to be washed before being melted anyway (the same as any other plate you'd clean), it seems like you are making a lot more work and power usage, for not much (if any, other than possibly cabinet space) gain.
 
2013-01-31 10:56:53 AM

dletter: it seems like you are making a lot more work and power usage, for not much (if any, other than possibly cabinet space) gain.


I'm sure this technology one day will allow New Yorkers to make an even more ridiculously small apartment.  When the price of storing a set of dishes per square feet exceeds the technology's price it will happen.
 
2013-01-31 11:04:54 AM

me texan: dletter: it seems like you are making a lot more work and power usage, for not much (if any, other than possibly cabinet space) gain.

I'm sure this technology one day will allow New Yorkers to make an even more ridiculously small apartment.  When the price of storing a set of dishes per square feet exceeds the technology's price it will happen.


LOL, that is true.   I guess me living in "Flyover country" and not in a city of over a million I didn't think about that ridiculousness.
 
2013-01-31 11:05:04 AM
Just starting at "Home Office", they missed the mark on telecommuting and ubiquious wireless connection, where you can telework anywhere, not just in a big "formal room".

The kitchen did predict replicators -- from TNG.

It took fiberoptics and the Internet to finally give us videophones.
 
2013-01-31 11:06:04 AM

Flint Ironstag: I want my flying car dammit!

/Oh yeah, and the sex robot.
//In fact, forget the flying car.


What about a flying sex robot?
 
2013-01-31 11:10:47 AM
I think their idea was that you'd melt down the plates without cleaning them -- the food residue would be "destroyed in the process". In reality, 3D printing from feed material with embedded crumbs, seeds and gristle doesn't work especially well. Besides, plastic plates, ick.

Dishwashers are working reasonably well these days, though.
 
2013-01-31 11:11:56 AM

dletter: What about a flying sex robot?


...who gives a flying fark?
 
2013-01-31 11:19:50 AM
i1151.photobucket.com
Replace me with a robot?
Good luck getting three serviceable holes and sandwich-making abilities with present-day technology!
 
2013-01-31 11:22:10 AM
Plastic that can be melted and remolded melts at a low enough temp it wouldn't simply really get rid of the remaining food. It would just be blending whatever is on the plate into the next thing it makes.

These are always funny because predicting technology is always going to be impossible. Things like a microprocessor completely changes things. While others like dishes and cooking will remain basically unchanged. Frozen food in a microwave is no way to eat.
 
2013-01-31 11:30:52 AM

jfarkinB: dletter: What about a flying sex robot?

...who gives a flying fark?


Those who possess circumferentially-kinetic perforated pastries.
 
2013-01-31 12:00:52 PM
Walter Cronkite opined that the house of the future would be different than what we have in reality.  Someone should complain about this.  The Consumerist is on the case!
 
2013-01-31 12:25:28 PM
24.media.tumblr.com

Approves
 
2013-01-31 12:29:10 PM
Posts like this always make me a bit sad. Back then they still had dreams and visions about the future, some kind of optimism. Now people either seem to think that there'll be only slow, incremental progress, nothing revolutionary, or that we are heading for the apocalypse. When was the last time a TV program dared to dream about our life in 50 years?
 
2013-01-31 12:47:27 PM

dletter: Flint Ironstag: I want my flying car dammit!

/Oh yeah, and the sex robot.
//In fact, forget the flying car.

What about a flying sex robot?


upload.wikimedia.org
ARTIST DEPICTION.
 
2013-01-31 12:47:45 PM

Klopfer: Posts like this always make me a bit sad. Back then they still had dreams and visions about the future, some kind of optimism. Now people either seem to think that there'll be only slow, incremental progress, nothing revolutionary, or that we are heading for the apocalypse. When was the last time a TV program dared to dream about our life in 50 years?


They also shot well below the mark of what we actually have achieved. Our technology today would have astounded us even ten years ago let alone 46 years ago. I don't think there is a lack of futurists out there and they often print news stories about future technology and many of them get posted to fark. If there were one it would just be because we have all seen how astoundingly wrong most of these predictions turn out to be. I bet they don't want all the other human consciousnesses downloaded into robot bodies to make fun of them in the year 2500
 
2013-01-31 12:50:14 PM
FTFA: Cronkite shows a huge console with knobs, switches and dials that control everything from the TV to the stereo to the tint of the windows. Much of this is doable now, without the need for a mammoth console that makes it look like you're running the lights for a Pink Floyd concert.

Unless, of course, you WANT to look like you're running the lights at a Pink Floyd concert.
 
2013-01-31 01:07:11 PM

KRSESQ: Unless, of course, you WANT to look like you're running the lights at a Pink Floyd concert.


Seriously, who doesn't?
 
2013-01-31 01:16:21 PM

theorellior: KRSESQ: Unless, of course, you WANT to look like you're running the lights at a Pink Floyd concert.

Seriously, who doesn't?


sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-01-31 01:36:26 PM

NBSV: Plastic that can be melted and remolded melts at a low enough temp it wouldn't simply really get rid of the remaining food. It would just be blending whatever is on the plate into the next thing it makes.

These are always funny because predicting technology is always going to be impossible. Things like a microprocessor completely changes things. While others like dishes and cooking will remain basically unchanged. Frozen food in a microwave is no way to eat.


That's why you heat it for 3 to 5 minutes (depending upon your wattage).
 
Ant
2013-01-31 03:51:06 PM
Then there's the separate machine that consolidates news from all over the world and allows him to print it out onto a huge broadsheet. We now call this the Internet, and most people don't find the need to print things out to read them.

except middle-managers and executives, of course
 
2013-01-31 04:33:50 PM

Egoy3k: Klopfer: Posts like this always make me a bit sad. Back then they still had dreams and visions about the future, some kind of optimism. Now people either seem to think that there'll be only slow, incremental progress, nothing revolutionary, or that we are heading for the apocalypse. When was the last time a TV program dared to dream about our life in 50 years?

They also shot well below the mark of what we actually have achieved. Our technology today would have astounded us even ten years ago let alone 46 years ago. I don't think there is a lack of futurists out there and they often print news stories about future technology and many of them get posted to fark. If there were one it would just be because we have all seen how astoundingly wrong most of these predictions turn out to be. I bet they don't want all the other human consciousnesses downloaded into robot bodies to make fun of them in the year 2500


So what didn't we have in some form 10 years ago that we have today?  I'd say technology basics have been stuck since the early 2000s with only speed improvements and not application improvements.
 
2013-01-31 05:23:52 PM

mrlewish: So what didn't we have in some form 10 years ago that we have today?  I'd say technology basics have been stuck since the early 2000s with only speed improvements and not application improvements.


I've had a similar feeling, but with things getting more ubiquitous and cheaper new aspects come forward. When I got my first "web enabled" cell phone in 2001 I could almost access a few sites that were tweaked. Now I can access the same sites as my laptop using my iPhone 4. Back then I could txt msg a contact, now I can post a status update to facebook and have it show up on twitter and update my Meetup group. The important thing that's changed is that the hardware now has enough power to do some interesting apps.

If you think about it, the computers we have today are just really well refined versions of that first windowed terminal Xerox showed off in the 1970's. The whole internet was previewed in the Victoria telegraph network. The first application of new technology is always to do what was done before but better.

/I wonder if kids ask "why is it called rewind?" in an era of discs and files.
 
2013-01-31 05:54:05 PM

Klopfer: Posts like this always make me a bit sad. Back then they still had dreams and visions about the future, some kind of optimism. Now people either seem to think that there'll be only slow, incremental progress, nothing revolutionary, or that we are heading for the apocalypse. When was the last time a TV program dared to dream about our life in 50 years?


You want to see an extensively researched movie about what the future will be like? Check out Minority Report. A ton of effort went into making that as potentially accurate as possible, with the notable exceptions of the existence of precogs and jetpacks. A number of technologies that didn't exist when the movie came out in 2002 have now been developed, and many others are in the works.
 
2013-01-31 08:29:54 PM
The problem with futurists is that they don't understand consumers. That is, they so often missed the mark on how technology would make everything smaller and more compact because people don't have space for nor want large objects in their homes. Just look at the massive counsel for operating the home entertainment system. Who the hell wants to have a space shuttle cockpit in their home for operating the TV and stereo? If they bothered to focus group that, the feedback from consumers would have reflected that.
 
2013-01-31 08:43:50 PM
That video got no gays to be fabulous!
 
2013-01-31 09:18:31 PM
OtherLittleGuy: It took fiberoptics and the Internet to finally give us videophones.

Videophones have been around longer than feasible fiber-optics and the everyman internet. It was all done with copper wire.
 
2013-01-31 10:56:29 PM

thornhill: The problem with futurists is that they don't understand consumers. That is, they so often missed the mark on how technology would make everything smaller and more compact because people don't have space for nor want large objects in their homes. Just look at the massive counsel for operating the home entertainment system. Who the hell wants to have a space shuttle cockpit in their home for operating the TV and stereo? If they bothered to focus group that, the feedback from consumers would have reflected that.


They got the big screen right though, but the control panel was ridiculous and they should have known it.

According to wikipedia Zenith was making an ultrasonic remote in 1956....a full 11 years before Cronkite's mission control for the home..

Transistors were also invented in the '50s and people were carrying around teeny transistor radios by '67.  Miniaturization was already happening.
 
2013-02-01 08:24:12 AM

OtherLittleGuy: The kitchen did predict replicators -- from TNG.


They had food replicators in TOS starting in 1966.

Though they were around from the very beginning, their function was specifically deliniated (though
probably not named) in the episode TOMORROW IS YESTERDAY where they make a meal for the 20th
century pilot with one (though why they have food replicators in the transporter room was always something
that I wondered about).
 
2013-02-01 08:43:26 AM

DjangoStonereaver: OtherLittleGuy: The kitchen did predict replicators -- from TNG.

They had food replicators in TOS starting in 1966. ....

(though why they have food replicators in the transporter room was always something
that I wondered about).


Because being stripped down to your component atoms and then reassembled really takes it out of you.  Diabetics in particular can get really cranky from the blood sugar crash after being transported..
 
2013-02-01 11:29:33 AM
dennysgod
[50's lady]
Approves


Is that from that Musical short about the kitchen of the future?

/MST3K for those who don't know what I am talking about.
 
2013-02-01 01:16:56 PM

DanInKansas: DjangoStonereaver: OtherLittleGuy: The kitchen did predict replicators -- from TNG.

They had food replicators in TOS starting in 1966. ....

(though why they have food replicators in the transporter room was always something
that I wondered about).

Because being stripped down to your component atoms and then reassembled really takes it out of you.  Diabetics in particular can get really cranky from the blood sugar crash after being transported..


"Here, Bones, have a replicated Snickers. Because every time you beam down, you become a Denebian slime devil."
 
2013-02-01 07:53:50 PM

DjangoStonereaver: OtherLittleGuy: The kitchen did predict replicators -- from TNG.

They had food replicators in TOS starting in 1966.

Though they were around from the very beginning, their function was specifically deliniated (though
probably not named) in the episode TOMORROW IS YESTERDAY where they make a meal for the 20th
century pilot with one (though why they have food replicators in the transporter room was always something
that I wondered about).


I'd have thought they would have used the same technology. Transporting someone must scan them, break them down and then reassemble them from the copy you have in memory from the scan. For food you just make a meal once, scan it but keep a copy of that scan in memory. Taste the food to make sure you're happy with it and then save the memory. Every time you want that meal just make another copy. You're transporting the meal but keeping the memory and making lots of copies.

Maybe on early ships the transporter/replicator machines needed some special power source or something, so it would make sense to have them in the same room.


/Of course the real reason is that weeks episode budget couldn't afford the mess hall set so they put it in the transporter room. Much like the transporter itself was thought up because they couldn't afford the SFX of a shuttle landing on a planet every week.
 
Displayed 33 of 33 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report