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(NPR)   35 years ago to the day, Fleetwood Mac's quintessential late 70s album 'Rumours' was released. To this day, some guy still hates it. BURN HIM AT THE STAKE   (npr.org) divider line 104
    More: Obvious, Fleetwood Mac, rumors, musical group, attitude change, Electric Light Orchestra, the Ramones, home recording, Richard Hell  
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1721 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 30 Jan 2013 at 6:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



104 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-30 01:28:58 AM
I had never noticed the balls hanging from Mick.

I also thing it's funny how the author is criticizing Fleetwood Mac for being a bland middle of the road band while he is writing for freaking  NPR!!!
 
2013-01-30 01:50:24 AM
The dude has a point.
 
2013-01-30 02:15:14 AM
Lindsey Buckingham was so HOT in his day. Sigh.
 
2013-01-30 02:38:19 AM
I've never really cared about it either. Not sure why it's relevant, art and music are only relevant to the observer/listener- whatever you like you like, and whatever you don't you don't, and the reasons why are only meaningful to you. I know and like lots of great people who listen to music that would make me stab my eardrums out, and probably vice versa.
 
2013-01-30 04:18:58 AM
Meh.  I have been a Fleetwood Mac fan since, oh, when i was 7 or so .  38 years later- they still sound good, imho.
Plus- Mick made a cool alien in st: tng
 
2013-01-30 05:38:43 AM
I'm still not a fan of Froggy.
 
2013-01-30 06:43:03 AM
Why were men so skinny back then?
 
2013-01-30 06:47:22 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Why were men so skinny back then?


Mountains of cocaine?
 
2013-01-30 06:54:52 AM
(looks up the tracks on Amazon)

I like The Chain. Go Your Own Way isn't bad, either.
 
2013-01-30 06:56:45 AM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-01-30 06:57:37 AM
Album reminds me of being a toddler. Walking around our single wide trailer, mom vacuuming, this album blaring in the Yamaha stereo.


/CSB
 
2013-01-30 07:08:23 AM
Haters can go ahead and hate. All they're doing is missing out.
 
2013-01-30 07:39:20 AM
I'm with that guy. Never understood the love for that album/group.
 
2013-01-30 07:45:13 AM
There will always be people nostalgic for the bland, soulless mass-market pop that came out in a particular era. This same conversation will probably be had in 35 years about the latest Taylor Swift album.
 
2013-01-30 07:50:06 AM

SilentStrider: I'm with that guy. Never understood the love for that album/group.


Go back further... they started out as a white guy blues band in the 60s, moved to more poppy stuff before SN came on board and they became huge. Future Games is a personal favorite. The song of the same title is dreamy psychedelia, kind of Alan Parsons-ish.
 
2013-01-30 07:57:05 AM
Even after having heard it fifty million times back then, I can still listen to those songs today and want to hear them again.

Especially "Songbird".

I can't say the same thing about any other popular successes from the same period. I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...
 
2013-01-30 08:02:54 AM
January 1977 was 36 years ago.

Still a good album.
 
2013-01-30 08:04:55 AM

Krikkitbot: I also thing it's funny how the author is criticizing Fleetwood Mac for being a bland middle of the road band while he is writing for freaking NPR!!!


Ever heard the NPR All Songs Considered podcast?

I"ll save you some time ... it's a roundtable discussion where a bunch of 40 somethings hate your favorite band, and then promote a garage band that they saw live at SXSW this year that banged on trashcans with a boatoar and fed feedback through their amps for 90 minutes. Then they play a 9 minute clip of said boat oars on trashcans and feedback. Then they then take turns in a game of hyperbole one-ups-manship as to who was the most effected by this band.

Guy 1: "When I first heard them, I broke down and openly sobbed remembering the inevitable death and decay of all life".

Guy 2: "Yeah, I had a little stronger reaction than you, because I'm much more sensitive to the power of music than you .... I openly sobbed to start out, but then I started to vomit bile from the sad, morose beauty of it all".

Guy 3: "Well, I guess I was a little more moved by the music than both of you, probably because you're both pop music loving philistines who probably listen to Carly Rae Jepsen .... but when I first heard this album, I openly sobbed, then vomited bile and then went a step further and put on a teaparty dress and started cutting myself because daddy never told me I was a pretty boy. I guess I just love real, authentic music that much than you, but you two go ahead and enjoy your Call Me Maybes"
 
2013-01-30 08:06:03 AM

phaseolus: Even after having heard it fifty million times back then, I can still listen to those songs today and want to hear them again.

Especially "Songbird".

I can't say the same thing about any other popular successes from the same period. I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...


images.amazon.com

www.welcometothe70s.com

www.retro-cafe.com

www.rollingstone.com

images.amazon.com
 
2013-01-30 08:07:36 AM
Meh.
 
2013-01-30 08:09:04 AM
 
2013-01-30 08:14:55 AM
McVie and Buckingham were awesome pop writers/performers. The rest of that lineup could vanish, and I personally wouldn't notice.
 
2013-01-30 08:20:15 AM

Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.


Another video of same song (jump to 2:00 for the band entrance if you are impatient)
 
2013-01-30 08:24:55 AM
The funny thing about the pop version of Fleetwood Mac is that it's still consummate musicianship, it's just been layered and tweaked and folded and smoothed out. And although everyone loves to make fun of Stevie Nicks and her gravelly voice, she can still sing like a motherfarker.

Anyway, "Rumours" is not something that I put on every day, but it has it's place. Much like Gerry Rafferty's "City to City". And if you're looking for a self-contained lesson in how to properly record, mix and layer a studio album, just pop on some headphones and listen to the magic.
 
2013-01-30 08:26:35 AM
I loathe them.
I had to sit through watching them become popular and live with their fans.
ba-a-a-a-a-a-a
 
2013-01-30 08:27:00 AM

FirstNationalBastard: phaseolus: Even after having heard it fifty million times back then, I can still listen to those songs today and want to hear them again.

Especially "Songbird".

I can't say the same thing about any other popular successes from the same period. I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...

[images.amazon.com image 300x292]

[www.welcometothe70s.com image 385x385]

[www.retro-cafe.com image 500x503]

[www.rollingstone.com image 500x500]

[images.amazon.com image 301x300]


Nice list. I would also throw in Bowie and Rolling Stones as peakers in the 70s.
 
2013-01-30 08:27:10 AM

Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.


Yeah, I made the mistake of buying that (premium-priced double album) also.
 
2013-01-30 08:29:07 AM

Shotgun Justice: FirstNationalBastard: phaseolus: Even after having heard it fifty million times back then, I can still listen to those songs today and want to hear them again.

Especially "Songbird".

I can't say the same thing about any other popular successes from the same period. I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...

[images.amazon.com image 300x292]

[www.welcometothe70s.com image 385x385]

[www.retro-cafe.com image 500x503]

[www.rollingstone.com image 500x500]

[images.amazon.com image 301x300]

Nice list. I would also throw in Bowie and Rolling Stones as peakers in the 70s.


and Roxy Music
 
2013-01-30 08:29:39 AM

Shotgun Justice: Nice list. I would also throw in Bowie and Rolling Stones as peakers in the 70s.


The only Stones that I actually like is the louche, sleazy, disco-tinged Stones around the time of "Emotional Rescue", "Miss You" and "Waiting on a Friend".
 
2013-01-30 08:31:50 AM

Shotgun Justice: FirstNationalBastard: phaseolus: Even after having heard it fifty million times back then, I can still listen to those songs today and want to hear them again.

Especially "Songbird".

I can't say the same thing about any other popular successes from the same period. I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...

[images.amazon.com image 300x292]

[www.welcometothe70s.com image 385x385]

[www.retro-cafe.com image 500x503]

[www.rollingstone.com image 500x500]

[images.amazon.com image 301x300]

Nice list. I would also throw in Bowie and Rolling Stones as peakers in the 70s.


Those albums are only from 1977, same year as Rumours.

The Stones didn't have a new album that year, but Bowie had Low and Heroes.
 
2013-01-30 08:32:07 AM

SilentStrider: I'm with that guy. Never understood the love for that album/group.


I don't care for Fleetwood Mac much, but I remember listening to that album 900 times when it came out--because those were the day, kids, when a cassette tape (I think it was a cassette and not an 8-track) was a prized possession, and you could only afford a few of them. So when Mom gave you the car to drive around at night, you had to bring your tapes with you or listen to the radio.

And all we had was Rumours. And Boston. There were a few others swimming around, but all I can remember is "Yoooouuuuuuuuuuuuuu, you make lovin fun!"

It amazes how much music I listened to unquestioningly when I was young and a captive audience, only to grow up and think, many years later, You know, I never liked those songs.
 
2013-01-30 08:33:43 AM
I saw them live in the early Eighties. Nicks spent most of the concert in a small, onstage tent, then toward the end of the show came out holding a rose with a ribbon around it. She apologized for being gone, saying that she was busy tying a ribbon around the rose.

Then she sniffed and wiped her nose with her hand. True story.
 
2013-01-30 08:34:34 AM

markfara: I saw them live in the early Eighties. Nicks spent most of the concert in a small, onstage tent, then toward the end of the show came out holding a rose with a ribbon around it. She apologized for being gone, saying that she was busy tying a ribbon around the rose.

Then she sniffed and wiped her nose with her hand. True story.


Oh, and Men at Work opened up for them. (Warren Zevon had cancelled.)
 
2013-01-30 08:36:59 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Elvis Costello- My Aim is True.jpg.


Holy Schit. Costello was a sublime fusion of Emo, Punk, New Wave, and Pop Mockery. Not many realize the true genius the man represented. What everybody projected onto Jim Morrison's drug-addled corpse, Elvis quietly embodied.
 
2013-01-30 08:37:44 AM

phaseolus: I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...


The sad thing is, Boston isn't bad. It's fine arena rock, and Tom Scholz is a decent guitarist. It's just been overplayed so freaking much that I can't hear any of it without getting all stabby.

Seriously, in the late 90s I was working in a shop where the radio was pegged to the Classic Rock station, and they played a Boston song every two hours. Literally. Every. Two. Hours. And not a deep cut. And nothing from "Third Stage", which for classic rock aficionados must've been some anathema from the 80s or something.

After the third repetition of "Foreplay/Long Time" you start getting a little bughouse.
 
2013-01-30 08:38:48 AM
It's an okay album. It's very well done from a production standpoint. I envy Lindsay Buckingham's fingerpicking abilities. If you're really into that period of Mac, skip "Tusk" and jump straight to Stevie Nicks' "Bella Donna." That's the closest thing to a good follow-up to "Rumours."

/Though some people really dig "Tusk."
 
2013-01-30 08:39:03 AM

markfara: I saw them live in the early Eighties. Nicks spent most of the concert in a small, onstage tent, then toward the end of the show came out holding a rose with a ribbon around it. She apologized for being gone, saying that she was busy tying a ribbon around the rose.

Then she sniffed and wiped her nose with her hand. True story.


Cocaine is a hell of a drug.
 
2013-01-30 08:39:33 AM

HAMMERTOE: Holy Schit. Costello was a sublime fusion of Emo, Punk, New Wave, and Pop Mockery. Not many realize the true genius the man represented. What everybody projected onto Jim Morrison's drug-addled corpse, Elvis quietly embodied.


Agreed. I consider his first three albums to be impeccable.
 
2013-01-30 08:39:56 AM

HAMMERTOE: FirstNationalBastard: Elvis Costello- My Aim is True.jpg.

Holy Schit. Costello was a sublime fusion of Emo, Punk, New Wave, and Pop Mockery. Not many realize the true genius the man represented. What everybody projected onto Jim Morrison's drug-addled corpse, Elvis quietly embodied.


Those first four Costello albums were magical (although "Armed Forces" was a bit overproduced).

If you don't squeal like a little girl whenever "Pump it Up" comes on the radio, you're simply not human.
 
2013-01-30 08:42:42 AM
They overplayed it. A lot. It's taken me a long time to be able to listen to it again.
 
2013-01-30 08:44:00 AM

theorellior: HAMMERTOE: Holy Schit. Costello was a sublime fusion of Emo, Punk, New Wave, and Pop Mockery. Not many realize the true genius the man represented. What everybody projected onto Jim Morrison's drug-addled corpse, Elvis quietly embodied.

Agreed. I consider his first three albums to be impeccable.


That's exactly what I was going to say.

Those first three albums are amazing.

Everything after? Eh, it has its moments.

/Costello was also doing better country music in that era than Nashville was crapping out.
 
2013-01-30 08:44:04 AM
The only F-Mac album I own is Then Play On.
 
2013-01-30 08:44:28 AM

theorellior: phaseolus: I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...

The sad thing is, Boston isn't bad. It's fine arena rock, and Tom Scholz is a decent guitarist. It's just been overplayed so freaking much that I can't hear any of it without getting all stabby.

Seriously, in the late 90s I was working in a shop where the radio was pegged to the Classic Rock station, and they played a Boston song every two hours. Literally. Every. Two. Hours. And not a deep cut. And nothing from "Third Stage", which for classic rock aficionados must've been some anathema from the 80s or something.

After the third repetition of "Foreplay/Long Time" you start getting a little bughouse.


I heard Boston's 'More than a Feeling' on the way home from work this morning.. very overplayed.
 
2013-01-30 08:46:30 AM

FirstNationalBastard: /Costello was also doing better country music in that era than Nashville was crapping out.


Indeed he was.
 
2013-01-30 08:49:44 AM

theorellior: FirstNationalBastard: /Costello was also doing better country music in that era than Nashville was crapping out.

Indeed he was.


That's because he did country, rather than that "rock-with-a-twang" sh*t that passes for country nowadays.
 
2013-01-30 08:50:46 AM

FirstNationalBastard: /Costello was also doing better country music in that era than Nashville was crapping out.


This.

But I just now had to go listen to Waiting for the End of the World for old time's sake.
 
2013-01-30 08:51:51 AM

Alphax: theorellior: phaseolus: I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...

The sad thing is, Boston isn't bad. It's fine arena rock, and Tom Scholz is a decent guitarist. It's just been overplayed so freaking much that I can't hear any of it without getting all stabby.

Seriously, in the late 90s I was working in a shop where the radio was pegged to the Classic Rock station, and they played a Boston song every two hours. Literally. Every. Two. Hours. And not a deep cut. And nothing from "Third Stage", which for classic rock aficionados must've been some anathema from the 80s or something.

After the third repetition of "Foreplay/Long Time" you start getting a little bughouse.

I heard Boston's 'More than a Feeling' on the way home from work this morning.. very overplayed.


Let me guess - KSHE95?
 
2013-01-30 08:52:39 AM

HAMMERTOE: FirstNationalBastard: /Costello was also doing better country music in that era than Nashville was crapping out.

This.

But I just now had to go listen to Waiting for the End of the World for old time's sake.


The legendary hitchhiker says that he knows where it's at.
 
2013-01-30 08:53:49 AM

verbaltoxin: Alphax: theorellior: phaseolus: I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...

The sad thing is, Boston isn't bad. It's fine arena rock, and Tom Scholz is a decent guitarist. It's just been overplayed so freaking much that I can't hear any of it without getting all stabby.

Seriously, in the late 90s I was working in a shop where the radio was pegged to the Classic Rock station, and they played a Boston song every two hours. Literally. Every. Two. Hours. And not a deep cut. And nothing from "Third Stage", which for classic rock aficionados must've been some anathema from the 80s or something.

After the third repetition of "Foreplay/Long Time" you start getting a little bughouse.

I heard Boston's 'More than a Feeling' on the way home from work this morning.. very overplayed.

Let me guess - KSHE95?


Bingo.

At least they're going with a 'never repeat the same song in one day' thing lately.
 
2013-01-30 08:55:18 AM

markfara: The legendary hitchhiker says that he knows where it's at.


...clean outta reach.
 
2013-01-30 08:56:11 AM

b0rscht: SilentStrider: I'm with that guy. Never understood the love for that album/group.

Go back further... they started out as a white guy blues band in the 60s, moved to more poppy stuff before SN came on board and they became huge. Future Games is a personal favorite. The song of the same title is dreamy psychedelia, kind of Alan Parsons-ish.


You can divide the band's output into three eras, more or less: the Peter Green blues-rock band at the start, and the Hollywood MOR stuff of the later period.

The middle period, with Bob Welch and Christine McVie doing most of the writing, and Danny Kirwan and Bob Weston supplying the guitar hooks, was always the most interesting to me. Albums like Kiln House, Mystery to Me, Future Games and Bare Trees were getting airtime on the college radio circuit and perhaps in some of the major metro areas in the states, but they were really a cult favorite through those years. "Mystery to Me" is having a comeback, of sorts, on Adult Alternative playlists.

Here ya go.

Thing is, I really like Lindsay Buckingham's songwriting. I just find the later work of the band to be over-produced and over-played.
 
2013-01-30 08:58:35 AM

OldManDownDRoad: b0rscht: SilentStrider: I'm with that guy. Never understood the love for that album/group.

Go back further... they started out as a white guy blues band in the 60s, moved to more poppy stuff before SN came on board and they became huge. Future Games is a personal favorite. The song of the same title is dreamy psychedelia, kind of Alan Parsons-ish.

You can divide the band's output into three eras, more or less: the Peter Green blues-rock band at the start, and the Hollywood MOR stuff of the later period.

The middle period, with Bob Welch and Christine McVie doing most of the writing, and Danny Kirwan and Bob Weston supplying the guitar hooks, was always the most interesting to me. Albums like Kiln House, Mystery to Me, Future Games and Bare Trees were getting airtime on the college radio circuit and perhaps in some of the major metro areas in the states, but they were really a cult favorite through those years. "Mystery to Me" is having a comeback, of sorts, on Adult Alternative playlists.

Here ya go.

Thing is, I really like Lindsay Buckingham's songwriting. I just find the later work of the band to be over-produced and over-played.


His solo stuff is by and large pretty enjoyable.
 
2013-01-30 08:58:47 AM

OldManDownDRoad: Thing is, I really like Lindsay Buckingham's songwriting. I just find the later work of the band to be over-produced and over-played.


I saw a special on the making of National Lampoon's Vacation recently, and Buckingham did their theme song himself, as a one man band.
 
2013-01-30 08:59:41 AM

Alphax: OldManDownDRoad: Thing is, I really like Lindsay Buckingham's songwriting. I just find the later work of the band to be over-produced and over-played.

I saw a special on the making of National Lampoon's Vacation recently, and Buckingham did their theme song himself, as a one man band.


Love that song. The dog bark sample during the fadeout is so breathtakingly goofy.
 
2013-01-30 09:00:22 AM

markfara: Shotgun Justice: FirstNationalBastard: phaseolus: Even after having heard it fifty million times back then, I can still listen to those songs today and want to hear them again.

Especially "Songbird".

I can't say the same thing about any other popular successes from the same period. I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...

[images.amazon.com image 300x292]

[www.welcometothe70s.com image 385x385]

[www.retro-cafe.com image 500x503]

[www.rollingstone.com image 500x500]

[images.amazon.com image 301x300]

Nice list. I would also throw in Bowie and Rolling Stones as peakers in the 70s.

and Roxy Music


 chalkhills.org
 
2013-01-30 09:04:03 AM

markfara: Alphax: OldManDownDRoad: Thing is, I really like Lindsay Buckingham's songwriting. I just find the later work of the band to be over-produced and over-played.

I saw a special on the making of National Lampoon's Vacation recently, and Buckingham did their theme song himself, as a one man band.

Love that song. The dog bark sample during the fadeout is so breathtakingly goofy.


I'll have to check that out.

I watched Buckingham do "Bleed to Love Her" as a promo in a local radio station for one of his solo tours. It's a great song and he played his heart out. Apparently he's a flake IRL, but most musicians are, more or less.

/know from long experience
 
2013-01-30 09:06:49 AM

markfara: theorellior: FirstNationalBastard: /Costello was also doing better country music in that era than Nashville was crapping out.

Indeed he was.

That's because he did country, rather than that "rock-with-a-twang" sh*t that passes for country nowadays.


Y'know, I feel I should have expanded on that statement... Nashville generally always puts out crappy pop with fiddles, and Costello's dabbling in country was and is generally better than anything coming out of mainstream country.

However, in the late-70s, Waylon and Willie and the boys were putting out some great stuff over in the Outlaw Country genre.

/and it's still going on today, where FM Pop Country still sucks, but the Alt Country stuff you have to search for is great.
 
2013-01-30 09:11:24 AM

FirstNationalBastard: However, in the late-70s, Waylon and Willie and the boys were putting out some great stuff over in the Outlaw Country genre.


Waxing nostalgic about Luckenbach, Texas, are we?
 
2013-01-30 09:11:51 AM

OldManDownDRoad: markfara: Alphax: OldManDownDRoad: Thing is, I really like Lindsay Buckingham's songwriting. I just find the later work of the band to be over-produced and over-played.

I saw a special on the making of National Lampoon's Vacation recently, and Buckingham did their theme song himself, as a one man band.

Love that song. The dog bark sample during the fadeout is so breathtakingly goofy.

I'll have to check that out.

I watched Buckingham do "Bleed to Love Her" as a promo in a local radio station for one of his solo tours. It's a great song and he played his heart out. Apparently he's a flake IRL, but most musicians are, more or less.

/know from long experience


I hear you. I used to hang some with a female musician whose name you would know. She was pretty brilliant, but how enjoyable spending time with her was really depended on which of her six or seven personalities was online at the time.

Her twin sister, on the other hand, was amazingly normal. Go figure. . . .
 
2013-01-30 09:18:14 AM

HAMMERTOE: FirstNationalBastard: However, in the late-70s, Waylon and Willie and the boys were putting out some great stuff over in the Outlaw Country genre.

Waxing nostalgic about Luckenbach, Texas, are we?


Actually, that was kind of the end of the good stuff.

'75 was a damn good year, though, with Red Headed Stranger, I'm A Rambling Man, and Dreaming My Dreams.
 
2013-01-30 09:25:10 AM

FirstNationalBastard: '75 was a damn good year, though, with Red Headed Stranger, I'm A Rambling Man, and Dreaming My Dreams.


And Kenny Rogers hadn't become the face of country music yet. I get you.
 
2013-01-30 09:27:01 AM
Listening to the album right now. The 2004 Deluxe Reissue that put Silver Springs back on the album, between Songbird and The Chain.
 
2013-01-30 09:33:22 AM

Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.


It has a good beat and I can dance to it.
 
2013-01-30 09:57:49 AM
Chicks were the downfall of the band.
When it was all just musicians, they were OK.
 
2013-01-30 09:58:26 AM
I'll even bring the stake for you.
 
2013-01-30 10:16:03 AM

InmanRoshi: Then they then take turns in a game of hyperbole one-ups-manship as to who was the most effected by this band.


So, what are their Fark handles? Have you read this thread? :D
 
2013-01-30 10:52:12 AM

Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.


That better be Tusk, click

Ok then, carry on
 
2013-01-30 11:34:23 AM
Then burn me at the stake. Sh*tty band, sh*tty album.
 
2013-01-30 12:36:24 PM

The English Major: Listening to the album right now. The 2004 Deluxe Reissue that put Silver Springs back on the album, between Songbird and The Chain.


this has to be one of your threads
 
2013-01-30 12:53:44 PM
Could have sworn that was late '77
 
2013-01-30 01:04:40 PM
belladonnadreamsister.angelfire.com
media-cache-ec4.pinterest.com
www.womenzmag.com

I'd have laid her down in the tall grass and done my stuff...
 
2013-01-30 01:12:59 PM
It was fine for its time and I had a copy that I played to death, but the years have not been kind to it. Plus, it was the Clintons anthem, which admittedly helped to turn me off to it.
 
2013-01-30 01:30:02 PM

geocacherphil: Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.

That better be Tusk, click

Ok then, carry on


Nah,,, Silver Springs for the win.
 
2013-01-30 02:18:23 PM

HAMMERTOE: markfara: The legendary hitchhiker says that he knows where it's at.

...clean outta reach.


With his two-tone Bible and funny cigarettes, his suntan lotion and his ca-ca-castinets.
 
2013-01-30 02:26:55 PM
I didn't like it much in 1977, but I was a teenager, and I was listening to new wave. I grew to appreciate it more later. The songs are far more relevant to a 30-something.
 
2013-01-30 03:06:03 PM
I was fascinated watching Buckingham play Big Love solo. That was some mad guitar playing.
 
2013-01-30 04:15:01 PM
I like Fleetwood Mac the same way I like the Moody Blues and the Alan Parsons Project. They change some from album to album, so there's always something to suit your mood. Can't say that about a lot of bands today, simply because they haven't been around long enough to evolve.
 
2013-01-30 04:37:55 PM

GameSprocket: I was fascinated watching Buckingham play Big Love solo. That was some mad guitar playing.

i50.tinypic.com
 
2013-01-30 04:40:39 PM
Why is it that the more obscure a persons taste in music is, the more hip they think they are?

Not everyone is looking to make a bold statement with their taste in music, some of us just like to hear a catchy tune on the radio that we can enjoy and sing along to or tune it out as background noise as the need arises.
 
2013-01-30 04:47:34 PM

ReapTheChaos: Why is it that the more obscure a persons taste in music is, the more hip they think they are?


Read any of Robert Cialdini's books, and you'll get some pretty good insight into it.
 
2013-01-30 04:58:42 PM
Don't ask me what I think of you -- I might not give the answer that you want me to.
 
2013-01-30 06:36:01 PM
Rule numero uno about old school record store clerks: NEVER trust their musical tastes.  They're so farking burned out on pop they have to go for the most obscure shiat on the planet.  It's not to say there isn't good obscure shiat out there (given that I have Deep Blue Something, Morphine and Oleander in my collection and enjoy all three, I kinda am contractually obligated to say so), it's just that there are few things in this life that are harder to find two people who share similar interests in than music.  Even my best friends, most of whom I'm in a band with, have completely different musical tastes than I do.
 
2013-01-30 06:37:49 PM

ReapTheChaos: Why is it that the more obscure a persons taste in music is, the more hip they think they are?

Not everyone is looking to make a bold statement with their taste in music, some of us just like to hear a catchy tune on the radio that we can enjoy and sing along to or tune it out as background noise as the need arises.


i172.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-30 06:38:47 PM

HAMMERTOE: FirstNationalBastard: Elvis Costello- My Aim is True.jpg.

Holy Schit. Costello was a sublime fusion of Emo, Punk, New Wave, and Pop Mockery. Not many realize the true genius the man represented. What everybody projected onto Jim Morrison's drug-addled corpse, Elvis quietly embodied.


Jim Morrison was an asshole. When I was a teenager (90s), I basically worshiped him. That stupid Oliver Stone movie (but I repeat myself) definitely added to it.

Then one day, for no real reason, it occurred to me that Morrison was a useless, pretentious twatwaffle whose only real claim to fame was being an unapologetic drunk and allegedly showing his penis somewhere in Florida. The 'poetry' was mostly tripe.

 The band itself was pretty good, and I recognize Morrison's "rock star" appeal. But c'mon, why don't more people notice how much a self-important douchenozzle he was?

/still loves "L.A. Woman," though...that song just rocks
 
2013-01-30 06:44:31 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Quantum Apostrophe: Why were men so skinny back then?

Mountains of cocaine?


Or heroin. Mick's beard is thicker than his torso for chrissake.
 
2013-01-30 07:16:21 PM

dickfreckle: HAMMERTOE: FirstNationalBastard: Elvis Costello- My Aim is True.jpg.

Holy Schit. Costello was a sublime fusion of Emo, Punk, New Wave, and Pop Mockery. Not many realize the true genius the man represented. What everybody projected onto Jim Morrison's drug-addled corpse, Elvis quietly embodied.

Jim Morrison was an asshole. When I was a teenager (90s), I basically worshiped him. That stupid Oliver Stone movie (but I repeat myself) definitely added to it.

Then one day, for no real reason, it occurred to me that Morrison was a useless, pretentious twatwaffle whose only real claim to fame was being an unapologetic drunk and allegedly showing his penis somewhere in Florida. The 'poetry' was mostly tripe.

 The band itself was pretty good, and I recognize Morrison's "rock star" appeal. But c'mon, why don't more people notice how much a self-important douchenozzle he was?

/still loves "L.A. Woman," though...that song just rocks


  I think you're the reason why people hate freckles on their junk. Jim didn't whip out his dick to become famous, he was famous long before that. The Doors didn't rely on Marilyn Manson "cheap tricks" for fame.    He probably did it to show that famous people can whip out their dicks and get away with it.  If LA woman is your favorite Doors song,,,then  You suck at Doors. Now go back to your nostalgia closet.

/Oh,,, And the Doors movie rocked.
 
2013-01-30 07:31:06 PM

HAMMERTOE: FirstNationalBastard: Elvis Costello- My Aim is True.jpg.

Holy Schit. Costello was a sublime fusion of Emo, Punk, New Wave, and Pop Mockery. Not many realize the true genius the man represented. What everybody projected onto Jim Morrison's drug-addled corpse, Elvis quietly embodied.


I always preferred Graham Parker & The Rumour.
 
2013-01-30 08:34:12 PM

Krikkitbot: I had never noticed the balls hanging from Mick.

I also thing it's funny how the author is criticizing Fleetwood Mac for being a bland middle of the road band while he is writing for freaking  NPR!!!


Rumors is a great album but everything they recorded after that is dull.
 
2013-01-30 09:09:31 PM

FirstNationalBastard: phaseolus: Even after having heard it fifty million times back then, I can still listen to those songs today and want to hear them again.

Especially "Songbird".

I can't say the same thing about any other popular successes from the same period. I'm looking at you, complete works of Boston...

[images.amazon.com image 300x292]

[www.welcometothe70s.com image 385x385]

[www.retro-cafe.com image 500x503]

[www.rollingstone.com image 500x500]

[images.amazon.com image 301x300]


You forgot VH debut album in '77. That farker changed how the guitar was played and sounded.
 
2013-01-30 09:12:49 PM
Oh hell, let's throw this one up there, crica 1980-81 I am guessing.
I'd hate to guess the amount of drugs within 10 feet of those three at that time.
www.statattacksports.com
 
2013-01-30 09:25:15 PM

ozarkmatt: Oh hell, let's throw this one up there, crica 1980-81 I am guessing.
I'd hate to guess the amount of drugs within 10 feet of those three at that time.
[www.statattacksports.com image 500x451]


Ok, Bonnie Raitt for sure, I think maybe David Lee Roth, but who's the youngster on the left?
 
2013-01-30 09:27:58 PM

ozarkmatt: I'd hate to guess the amount of drugs within 10 feet of those three at that time.


Here's a pic:

lol4eva.com
 
2013-01-30 09:45:08 PM

dickfreckle: still loves "L.A. Woman," though...that song just rocks


Favorite song of all time.
 
2013-01-30 09:47:46 PM

ununcle: If LA woman is your favorite Doors song,,,then You suck at Doors


Guess I won't be getting a farking Xmas card from you next year.
 
2013-01-30 10:53:20 PM
The more hip you think they think they think they are. We all like music for our own reasons. When i heard fleetwood mac i didnt think im not gonna not like this on purpose to be bold and just to upset someone on the internet in 20 years
 
2013-01-30 10:57:28 PM
TUSK
 
2013-01-30 11:32:34 PM

Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.


Nah. This is.

Link
 
2013-01-31 12:37:26 AM

John Buck 41: ununcle: If LA woman is your favorite Doors song,,,then You suck at Doors

Guess I won't be getting a farking Xmas card from you next year.


Don't get me wrong. I love LA woman. It's just IMO "When the musics over" should have been the Doors "Stairway to heaven".  Or hell even "the End".  Oh, for fark sake, Whiskey bar, or moonlight drive or, riders of the storm,,,, or about almoust anything pre- touuch me babe. Just my opinion.
 
2013-01-31 08:33:26 AM

saturn badger: Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.

Nah. This is.

Link


I'll go with this one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaTd_oItViI
 
2013-01-31 11:40:46 AM
February 4, 1977 - January 29 2013 =/= 35 years to the day, subby.
 
2013-01-31 11:55:51 AM

Crewmannumber6: saturn badger: Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.

Nah. This is.

Link

I'll go with this one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaTd_oItViI


Yep. Gotta agree with Rattlesnake Shake.

I don't really like any other version of Fleetwood Mac, but I won't be a dick about it if you do.
 
2013-01-31 08:53:06 PM

Big Beef Burrito: Crewmannumber6: saturn badger: Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.

Nah. This is.

Link

I'll go with this one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaTd_oItViI

Yep. Gotta agree with Rattlesnake Shake.

I don't really like any other version of Fleetwood Mac, but I won't be a dick about it if you do.


Like the song and the band lineup. But as a Junior High Band Nerd (at that time), Tusk was one of the "Holy Grail" songs. Played coronet and TUBA!!!
 
2013-01-31 09:55:58 PM

Crewmannumber6: saturn badger: Count_0: The Best Fleetwood Mac song.

Nah. This is.

Link

I'll go with this one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaTd_oItViI


Nice.

Here is one from Journey before they got corrupted.

Link
 
2013-02-01 01:06:26 PM
It's not just the music, it's the story behind it.  Bunch of musicians, all having been screwing each other (some changing lovers mid-session) or married/divorced, tons of drugs, egos out the wazoo, and producers trying to keep them together in the sessions, going so far as to almost stick them in hostel rooms to cloister them.  You had band members writing and singing lyrics about their breakups with other band members, or about the lovers they'd had since they broke up with someone in the band.  I remember hearing a live version of "Never Going Back Again," a song Buckingham wrote about a fling with a woman while he was with Stevie Nicks, and Nicks came out to do guest vocals with him; it felt horribly awkward.  The entire album had heart-wrenching, agonizing, twist the knife negative karma, but it worked.  When you combine all the talent, angst and yes, chemical substances, it does make for amazing music.

It's like the Abbey Road sessions; a bunch of guys who didn't want to be playing music together anymore, roped into it by the producer, teasing their best creations out of them in a month-long session, ultimately creating one of the best Beatles albums ever made (if not one of the best albums of all time).

Music, like any art has to be one of those things that arises from pain, regret, longing.  We are often the best when things are at their worst, and that brings out the best lyrics, harmonies and compositions.

Rumours is one of the few albums I can listen to beginning to end and never feel like it's been overplayed.  Then again I can do the same with Tenacious D's first album, so it's not as if I'm trying to be a snob about it.
 
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