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(My Fox Orlando)   Would-be carjackers to their victim: "What's this third pedal for?"   (myfoxorlando.com) divider line 312
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17447 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Jan 2013 at 2:49 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-29 05:12:52 PM

Psylence: Also, for snowy shiatty weather, automatics are massive fail. If you don't understand why, there's no point trying to explain.


If only automatics had some sort of function that let you use lower gears as well...
 
2013-01-29 05:13:13 PM

thisone: There should be a little silver button at the back of the fob, near the top of the circular fob and the bottom of the "handle" for lack of a better word. Press that, pull up on the "handle", and you should now have a key in one hand, and the fob in the other.


ssshhh...just let them think they were powerless. If you tell them they could get in all along, they will suddenly feel stupid, and then you've gone and ruined their day. You big meanie.
 
2013-01-29 05:13:18 PM

fozziewazzi: amundb: I am starting to get pissed at the people behind me at long lights who beep at me. I like to put the car into neutral and take my foot off the clutch while waiting. As soon as that light turns green, people do not understand the extra 0.00000554 second delay it takes me to put my car into first and start beeping at me right away. Sorry I ruined you day because I don't drive a crappy automatic.

Whenever I get to even the slightest incline at a red light I put the Jeep into neutral and let it drift backwards for a foot or so. It's amazing how quickly people behind me snap to attention and back off.


Gawds, I hate those people... and driving frequently in San Francisco means lots of hills that I have to get into gear on. At least people seem used to that problem there and don't tend to tailgate too badly, but the tourists are obvious since they get right on your bumper.

My BIGGEST issue, though, are the people that will lay on your horns because you DARE to wait at a crosswalk before making a right turn because there's a pedestrian crossing in front of you. I just don't know if those people expect me to run the walker over or what...

/end rant
//half of them are taxi drivers
 
2013-01-29 05:13:41 PM

MindStalker: eas81: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 850x818] [i.imgur.com image 651x481]

I've been trying to teach my daughter to drive my manual. I'm considering buying this, the little Learners Driver magnet isn't helping to avoid the honking. BTW people are rude.....


I see certain advantage to putting a "beginning driver" sign on a car and leaving it there, particularly for bar night.
 
2013-01-29 05:15:21 PM

rangercheese: I've always thought of the stereotypical Farker as someone who:

* drives a manual,
* drinks only microbrews, and
* runs Linux.

/1 out of 3
//long way to go to win the Fark Triple Crown


2/3. I got kids. I don't really drink anymore.
 
2013-01-29 05:16:01 PM
www.ev1.pair.com

Push button shift FTW :-p
 
2013-01-29 05:18:16 PM

sunbyrne: The only configuration my car came in is 6-speed manual. That's how you know you've found the right car, they don't even mess with automatics.

/ 263 hp, 280 lb-ft torque, 3200 lbs
// zoom zoom


Same here, a 2010 (w/ hood scoop goodness!)
 
2013-01-29 05:18:22 PM

Wellon Dowd: MindStalker: In before Manual/Automatic argument!

There is no argument. Unless you're both a spastic and an idiot, manual is better.


Not true, a friend of the family had really bad arthritis from her 40s, and an automatic kept her relatively mobile/independent for years after when she otherwise couldn't have got about at all herself.
 
2013-01-29 05:19:15 PM
"when in doubt, both feet out."
 
2013-01-29 05:20:08 PM

rangercheese: I've always thought of the stereotypical Farker as someone who:

* drives a manual,
* drinks only microbrews, and
* runs Linux.

/1 out of 3
//long way to go to win the Fark Triple Crown


Yep.
I'm a Guinness guy.
Yep.
 
2013-01-29 05:22:48 PM
aaronius 2013-01-29 05:11:02 PM

WhoGAS: The only reason I like stick shift (these days...racing when younger) is because if your battery dies, you only need a good hill or a strong push to get your car started again.

The lack of field current in the alternator to create the magnetism for electrical generation would beg to differ. Unless you're going old school with a permanent magnet generator...


So you're saying we can't do that these days?

Because if you're purposefully switching it to "old school" as you say, I assume you're implying that things have changed and do not work the way you state in your initial idea.

Last time I did that was on a 90s model something or another. Girl thought I was magic...(no, nothing came of it...she was just not bright)
 
2013-01-29 05:22:49 PM

Lsherm: aaronius: WhoGAS: The only reason I like stick shift (these days...racing when younger) is because if your battery dies, you only need a good hill or a strong push to get your car started again.

The lack of field current in the alternator to create the magnetism for electrical generation would beg to differ. Unless you're going old school with a permanent magnet generator...

It's been a long time, but I had a 1989 Ford Escort and we used to hill jump that farking thing all the time.  It had a short in one of the rear tailights so the battery would go dead all the time.


As long as there is some degree of charge in the battery, you're golden. But if the battery is flat dead, you won't get any output from the alternator. There are no permanent magnets in modern alternators (those built after the 1960s or so), so all the magnetism is created from current passing through a set of windings known as the stator.

I'm gonna stop there before I go into a whole lecture about how alternators work.
 
2013-01-29 05:23:17 PM

Savage Bacon: Never understood why people are so fixated on manual and feeling "connected" to their car, as if this somehow creates a symbiotic relationship. I drive my car to get from point A to point B and feel in control of it the whole time. It's a tool, not a toy, but I suppose that this is where the difference lies. I don't use a car to feel like I'm in the land of race car ya-yas; the land where you can't change lanes; the land where large fuzzy dice hang proudly, like testicles, from rear-view mirrors.


Bolded is the section where you become a condescending twat. Now you can go work on your social skills...
 
2013-01-29 05:23:59 PM

pastorkius: but you can't expect too performance much out of a 1.1L engine.


I drive a 1985 Mazda RX-7 with the 12A Wankle rotary engine. 1143 CC. 1.1 liter. 5-speed. It's pretty zippy, even though, at 107 horsepower and 105 ft. lbs. of torque, it's not really what I would consider "powerful". But it's a rotary, not a piston-engine. And sadly, Mazda just quit making the rotary.
 
2013-01-29 05:25:19 PM

thisone: chairmenmeow47: garumph: Some of the newer manuals (MINI Cooper) have hill hold. Works better than an auto on a hill. The only problem is when I swap to the older MINI and forget the hill hold isn't there.

my mom's mini once wouldn't open the car since there's no actual key and it's just a button. she was pretty cold that night until someone could pick her up.

i don't get why cars are now computers. i miss the days when a few guys with a beer in one hand could easily fix your car for cheap. now you need a computer technician just to open the door.

um, there is a key (at least on mine there is)

There should be a little silver button at the back of the fob, near the top of the circular fob and the bottom of the "handle" for lack of a better word. Press that, pull up on the "handle", and you should now have a key in one hand, and the fob in the other.


i'll let her know, but she called the dealership and they couldn't help her. i wasn't there, she was up in the mountains.
 
2013-01-29 05:27:34 PM
I learned to drive on an '81 Mazda RX-7 (with a manual choke). I complained to my dad at the time because he refused to let me get my license until I was able to drive the stick competently. Now I think it may be one of the best things he did for me as a teenager.

I dread going to dealerships as a woman. The run-arounds are amazing, and as much as I hate it, I tended to lean toward letting my husband do all the talking when I bought automatics. However... As soon as I say "I'm only looking for a manual," their attitudes switch immediately. It's amazing.

Current car is a 2009 manual Honda Fit. I drive it in Boston rush-hour traffic all the time. Love it, no complaints. I feel I pay attention far more when I'm driving the manual transmission - and nothing beats the control you have during crappy weather.
 
2013-01-29 05:28:01 PM

NASAM: My son just got his permit and I've been looking for a car for him. My three stipulations: $5k or less, 4 cylinder, and manual. Can't find anything anywhere.


Just bought a 2000 Corolla for my daughter for $3.5k. 4 cyl and manual. Nice condition with 105k miles. She insisted on a manual.
 
2013-01-29 05:30:13 PM

durbnpoisn: I have a 5-speed. But for only one reason. It was a car I could afford. Generally speaking the same model of any stickshift I've owned costs a lot more with an automatic trans. Plus, they tend to be faster and more responsive. You know, if that sort of thing is important to you.

I think I've owned 5 different cars that were stick. I think the only thing I don't like about manual is that it's difficult to play drums in traffic. And that is very important to me.


Impossible to do double bass.
 
2013-01-29 05:30:51 PM
The automatic was the first step in the ascension of man to a post-human utopia controlled by the Machines.

I, for one, welcome our glorious automated overlords

/Can't wait for my robot self-driving Google car
 
2013-01-29 05:32:32 PM

thisone: garumph: Some of the newer manuals (MINI Cooper) have hill hold. Works better than an auto on a hill. The only problem is when I swap to the older MINI and forget the hill hold isn't there.

I didn't know that was a feature for the first, say 8 months of having my Mini Cooper. I go up a steep hill that has a cross road right at the top, plus where I grew up in the states, the main road had a stop light on a hill, so I'm quite used to hill starts.

I love hill hold.


I taught a friend how to start up on a hill with a cluth. She didn't think it would be possible. Put on barking brake (obviously, you need good brakes for this to work). Give a little gas and let out clutch until you feel it catch. Now more gas and ease out the cluth until you feel it trying to pull the car forward. Start letting off the hand break as you continue with gas and clutch. I taught her with a '72 VW Bug.

If you are really good, you don't need that trick, but that takes practice and knowing your car very well.
 
2013-01-29 05:35:44 PM

antidumbass: Stick shifts are better for all the other drivers on the road because you can't use a cell phone or eat a taco whilst driving.
/2 cents


This is incorrect.
 
2013-01-29 05:39:18 PM

OgreMagi: rangercheese: I've always thought of the stereotypical Farker as someone who:

* drives a manual,
* drinks only microbrews, and
* runs Linux.

/1 out of 3
//long way to go to win the Fark Triple Crown

Yep.
I'm a Guinness guy.
Yep.


The question is, did you get a towel?

/0 for 3 myself.  I don't drink alcohol - I'm allergic to most fruity drinks, and can't stand most other drinks - I drive an automatic (it was cheap, I needed a car, and oh yeah my foot's big enough that when I was learning how to drive it would get "stuck" going from gas to brake and back - so I drive with one on gas and one on brake, or more commonly one gas one to the side of brake), and I haven't done anything with Linux since Ubuntu came out.
 
2013-01-29 05:40:40 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: It's probably got a dual-clutch transmission. Basically, an automatic manual for people who can't drive manuals.


Yeah, like Walter Roehrl.
 
2013-01-29 05:42:14 PM
I'm a car guy. I've been a licensed driver for 14 years and have owned 11 different cars, 5 manual, 5 automatic, and 1 CVT. I prefer manual on track and for autocross (and onramps and offramps :)), but yeah, automatic is nicer in traffic. The automatics I've owned were beaters, hand-me-downs, or cars I wanted that didn't come in manual.

In my opinion (and it's just my opinion), for a driver's car (not a grocery getter/commuter), manual is the only way to go. If you're serious about having fun in a car, you need to put down the taco and concentrate on driving. (note: I do eat tacos while commuting with a manual, but I'm ninja like that).

These days I'm rocking a 6sp manual E46 BMW M3. The alternative there was the SMG transmission (same gearbox, just "automatic", essentially a hydraulic clutch and shifter connected to a computer). Eff that noise, clutch please!
 
2013-01-29 05:42:31 PM
That's when two men took him by surprise while he was inside his bright, yellow Corvette.

They should have shot the car.
 
2013-01-29 05:43:01 PM

pounddawg: The automatic transmission was the first step in the downfall of western civilization


Close, but not quite. The downfall of western civilization began with the disappearance of the manual spark advance lever.

Could you imagine how free and easy the roads would be if you still needed brains and coordination to drive a car?
 
2013-01-29 05:44:23 PM

Wellon Dowd: MindStalker: In before Manual/Automatic argument!

There is no argument. Unless you're both a spastic and an idiot, manual is better.


What's the over/under for people who drive manual bright yellow Corvettes?
 
2013-01-29 05:45:13 PM

chairmenmeow47: thisone: chairmenmeow47: garumph: Some of the newer manuals (MINI Cooper) have hill hold. Works better than an auto on a hill. The only problem is when I swap to the older MINI and forget the hill hold isn't there.

my mom's mini once wouldn't open the car since there's no actual key and it's just a button. she was pretty cold that night until someone could pick her up.

i don't get why cars are now computers. i miss the days when a few guys with a beer in one hand could easily fix your car for cheap. now you need a computer technician just to open the door.

um, there is a key (at least on mine there is)

There should be a little silver button at the back of the fob, near the top of the circular fob and the bottom of the "handle" for lack of a better word. Press that, pull up on the "handle", and you should now have a key in one hand, and the fob in the other.

i'll let her know, but she called the dealership and they couldn't help her. i wasn't there, she was up in the mountains.


Serious question, since different model years can be different, do her car handles have key locks?

First thing I asked on the test drive when I was handed the fob, was why the handles had key locks if I didn't have a key. That's when the sales woman showed me the button.

Also, the fob gets recharged when its in the ignition slot, so no worrying about a dead fob and not being able to start the car. Haven't tested that part though.
 
2013-01-29 05:46:28 PM

oakleym82:

These days I'm rocking a 6sp manual E46 BMW M3. The alternative there was the SMG transmission (same gearbox, just "automatic", essentially a hydraulic clutch and shifter connected to a computer). Eff that noise, clutch please!


+1 on using E46. Your car guy credentials check out.
 
2013-01-29 05:48:31 PM

SpiderQueenDemon: I'm pretty sure that's the only reason my car wasn't stolen when I lived in a sketchy place one summer for one of my college internships. My neighbors went through two cars in one summer, and they weren't nice cars, either.

If anyone has time for a 'Cool Story, Sis' about stupid car mods, you can keep reading. If not, just scroll down to the next comment.

The smash-and-grab problem was so bad that I went to the junkyard and pulled the front off an old tape deck to shove in the console, then soldered some longer wires to the harness, ran them under the plastic cowling and actually managed to get the real head unit installed vertically in the center glovebox. You'd open the top, put in your CD or connect your MP3 player, and carry on, though I did have to cut some subtle vent holes and wire in a computer fan to keep the unit at a safe temperature in the summer and I actually used some metal straps and screws to really secure it in there so it couldn't just be yanked. Had to disassemble almost the entire middle of the interior to do it, but my time was worth nothing then and the radio had been a present from my Dad, so I really did not want it stolen.

I also used a Dremel to cut a cassette tape in half and glued it into the tape-deck-front so it looked like I was actually using it. Eventually I put the tape-deck-front onto hinges and used some Sugru and Krazy Glue to securely wedge a plastic box into the original radio's spot (it once contained frozen eclairs, but a good cleaning and some Krylon for Plastic made it work,) and so my car's wonderful radio security system consisted of the radio and the center glovebox being in opposite places. I also wired a little hidden switch into the ignition so even with the key, the car would only start if one knew exactly what switch to flip. Again, my time was worth nothing at this point, and the car wasn't worth much more, but I'd lose my job if I lost it and I had very little choice but to innovate.

After that was done, I'd ...


2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-01-29 05:50:34 PM
I must be a weirdo in that I don't have a strong preference in the auto/manual transmission debate. I drove stick shifts for years because they're generally cheaper and more fuel efficient but my current car (Scion xB) is automatic. I guess the auto transmission nice in traffic, and it has clutchless shifting which is fun to play with if I want to pretend I'm "really" driving.
 
2013-01-29 05:51:46 PM

thamike: What's the over/under for people who drive manual bright yellow Corvettes?


3 1/2 inches
 
2013-01-29 05:57:54 PM
i.imgur.com

Well no wonder you're stalling out. You don't "tap" the accelerator, you press it harder at the same rate that you ease up on the clutch.
 
2013-01-29 05:59:40 PM

Savage Bacon: Never understood why people are so fixated on manual and feeling "connected" to their car, as if this somehow creates a symbiotic relationship. I drive my car to get from point A to point B and feel in control of it the whole time. It's a tool, not a toy, but I suppose that this is where the difference lies. I don't use a car to feel like I'm in the land of race car ya-yas; the land where you can't change lanes; the land where large fuzzy dice hang proudly, like testicles, from rear-view mirrors.


Symbiotic, no. More control, yes. Also, a manual forces one to be more aware of their surroundings and what's going on. In regards to the A->B, I take it you've never driven a well engineered German car. I'm not talking about those Americanized jokes of the Passat and Jeftta VW is hawking these days either. I use to only feel like driving was a necessary burden until I got a GTI; then driving became enjoyable.

In a manual, which gear is more appropriate can be chosen and doesn't require going through each gear to get there (double-clutching and rev-matching will save those synchros and the clutch). When I drive there're many times where all I want to do is add a little more torque and it's not a problem, but in an automatic it decides it needs to down shift through one or two gears and increase the revs for no reason. Engine braking is really nice as well and generally isn't as efficient in an automatic.

One of my biggest frustrations with automatics is it can't always anticipate what I want especially when I'm trying to avoid an accident. In a manual, I'm leaps and bounds faster getting the car to do what I need in order to avoid some moron. I've had the automatic just go herpedy derpedy on me and the idiot running the red almost hit me. My wife's car is especially frustrating; it has a Tiptronic, regular automatic that one can set to a "manual mode". My biggest complaint is if I slap that lever three times in the time it would take me to go from 6th to 3rd in my manual, I expect it to downshift three gears; instead it will only downshift one gear and possibly two if the planets are properly aligned. I like the idea of a DSG transmission, but my concern is it would have the same userland problems as the tiptronic I have. If I say to downshift three, I expect it do it and do it within the time it would take me in a manual or faster.

I don't think I'll enjoy driving unless it's in a manual. Eventually it won't be feasible to daily drive an internal combustion engine car and so far it looks like a Tesla Model S could appease me. At my current pay, a house would be a better investment than one of those though.
 
2013-01-29 06:15:34 PM

sunbyrne: The only configuration my car came in is 6-speed manual. That's how you know you've found the right car, they don't even mess with automatics.

/ 263 hp, 280 lb-ft torque, 3200 lbs
// zoom zoom


Mazdaspeed version of the Mazda 3? That's one of the cars on my short list :-)
 
2013-01-29 06:33:26 PM

aaronius: Lsherm: aaronius: WhoGAS: The only reason I like stick shift (these days...racing when younger) is because if your battery dies, you only need a good hill or a strong push to get your car started again.

The lack of field current in the alternator to create the magnetism for electrical generation would beg to differ. Unless you're going old school with a permanent magnet generator...

It's been a long time, but I had a 1989 Ford Escort and we used to hill jump that farking thing all the time.  It had a short in one of the rear tailights so the battery would go dead all the time.

As long as there is some degree of charge in the battery, you're golden. But if the battery is flat dead, you won't get any output from the alternator. There are no permanent magnets in modern alternators (those built after the 1960s or so), so all the magnetism is created from current passing through a set of windings known as the stator.

I'm gonna stop there before I go into a whole lecture about how alternators work.


I guess I never really thought about it, but I thought the field current to the rotor was provided by the battery UNTIL the alternator was spinning fast enough to take over.  Like this guys explanation:

http://alternatorparts.com/understanding_alternators.htm

I mean, presumably you wouldn't be able to get it spinning that fast in practice, but if you had the world's longest hill, shouldn't it still be possible?  Just wondering.
 
2013-01-29 06:34:39 PM

Savage Bacon: Never understood why people are so fixated on manual and feeling "connected" to their car, as if this somehow creates a symbiotic relationship. I drive my car to get from point A to point B and feel in control of it the whole time. It's a tool, not a toy, but I suppose that this is where the difference lies. I don't use a car to feel like I'm in the land of race car ya-yas; the land where you can't change lanes; the land where large fuzzy dice hang proudly, like testicles, from rear-view mirrors.


Congratulations, you drive an appliance.
 
2013-01-29 06:36:43 PM

you have pee hands: OgreMagi: Miatas are great little cars. I'm on my second one. I convinced a friend that a Miata is the best possible choice for his teenage daughter (with the addition of a roll-bar). It's not actually a fast car, though it is nimble. It only seats two! The intelligence of teenagers is inversly proportional to the quantity of teenagers, so when in a car you want to keep their number to a minimum. Used Miatas in good shape are readily available and reasonably priced. Finally, despite the limitations, getting her a Miata makes you "the coolest dad EVAH!" At least for the next hour or so. Teens are fickle and have a short memory.

Miatas are so low they're easy to lose in blind spots, though. I see right over the top of them driving an RSX.


Air horns help, I've had several close calls. I'm on my third NA. The first two were totalled-- first one was NOT my fault-- rear-ended at high speed by a college kid; the second one I had the sun in my eyes and was t-boned. Walked away from both unscathed. My current NA is nicknamed "Charm." o.O

/I do need to get a roll-bar
 
2013-01-29 06:41:13 PM
ItchyBrother: sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-01-29 06:41:22 PM

sunbyrne: The only configuration my car came in is 6-speed manual. That's how you know you've found the right car, they don't even mess with automatics.

/ 263 hp, 280 lb-ft torque, 3200 lbs
// zoom zoom


I resemble this remark.

/ 240 hp, 153 lb-ft torque, 2800lbs
// the power of dreams
/// Slashies come in 3s
 
2013-01-29 06:46:33 PM

Frozboz: SpiderQueenDemon: If anyone has time for a 'Cool Story, Sis' about stupid car mods, you can keep reading. If not, just scroll down to the next comment.

Living in Brooklyn in the mid-90s my roommate had his mid-80s Accord broken into seven times one summer. Smashed that little oddly-shaped window each time, and opened the doors from there. Very polite, as this window was the cheapest to replace. The final time it was broken into, there was nothing left to steal - the radio was long gone, the glovebox was open (showing nothing inside), even the rear seat folded down to show nothing in the trunk. So, the thieves took a Kleenex box, dumped the tissues, and (we suppose) used it to carry the cassette tapes from the next car ahead, which was smashed and had its stuff stolen.

Good times. I had a late 80s Sentra a few years later. It was hit a few times, but with a detachable-case radio and the 6-disc changer stealthily mounted under the seat, they never got much. The first time, in the winter, they broke that same small triangle-shaped window, and rolled down the driver-side main window all the way. I thought it was smashed (glass on the ground, everywhere), so I drove to the window guy in sub-freezing weather with the window simply down. When I got there, they rolled it up and all had a good laugh at my expense.

/end CSB


Holy shiat, I'd have moved after second or third break-in!

A buddy of mine used to live in San Francisco. He drove an old Miata and would leave the top down and the empty glove box open so no one would:

A. break in and rummage through his glove box
B. slash his roof because there was nothing to steal in the car

For some reason, no one ever stole the stock radio/cassette deck. I guess even crackheads have standards.
 
2013-01-29 06:47:48 PM

Lsherm: aaronius: Lsherm: aaronius: WhoGAS: The only reason I like stick shift (these days...racing when younger) is because if your battery dies, you only need a good hill or a strong push to get your car started again.

The lack of field current in the alternator to create the magnetism for electrical generation would beg to differ. Unless you're going old school with a permanent magnet generator...

It's been a long time, but I had a 1989 Ford Escort and we used to hill jump that farking thing all the time.  It had a short in one of the rear tailights so the battery would go dead all the time.

As long as there is some degree of charge in the battery, you're golden. But if the battery is flat dead, you won't get any output from the alternator. There are no permanent magnets in modern alternators (those built after the 1960s or so), so all the magnetism is created from current passing through a set of windings known as the stator.

I'm gonna stop there before I go into a whole lecture about how alternators work.

I guess I never really thought about it, but I thought the field current to the rotor was provided by the battery UNTIL the alternator was spinning fast enough to take over.  Like this guys explanation:

http://alternatorparts.com/understanding_alternators.htm

I mean, presumably you wouldn't be able to get it spinning that fast in practice, but if you had the world's longest hill, shouldn't it still be possible?  Just wondering.


Yeah, that sounds about right. Keep in mind also that the relative sizes of the pulleys mean that the alternator is going to spin around 2x faster than the crank. But typically speaking, there will be no appreciable output from the alternator until the engine hits 6-700 RPM, numbers courtesy of 15 year memory. (and yes, I realize that in my Boobies I swapped the rotor and stator)

All I was saying is that there needs to be some source of initial current before the alternator will make its own juice.
 
2013-01-29 06:48:43 PM
71 VW manual bug. Even of they could start it the little tards probably would not be able to find reverse
 
2013-01-29 06:56:25 PM

KidneyStone: dahmers love zombie: I wonder if I could get a car outfitted with a 3-speed column shifter.  I could leave the keys in it all the time with zero worry.

THREE ON THE TREE!


Was hoping to see that reference. My first car was a '68 Falcon w/ 3 on the tree. Was a challenge to drive around San Francisco and in city traffic in general, but it was a pretty reliable car overall.
 
2013-01-29 07:02:38 PM

SpiderQueenDemon: Cheron: I had a CRX when I was dating. Can't think of any thing I didn't do in that car that I've done since.

I, also, had a series of CRXes! First my college boyfriend and I had our first-gen '87, then an '89, then an '86 after the first two rusted out. And yes, those are excellent dating cars. The seats go so far back and recline so close to flat, provided you've kept up your yoga and are of relatively light build, you can do as you please in them.

In fact, said college boyfriend proposed in the '87. We've been happily married for some time and are only now thinking of handing down our engine-swapped Acura Integra coupe (which is the closest thing to a CRX we could get after Cash For Clunkers gutted the market,) in favor of something built in the past ten years.

Any suggestions?


I had an '85 CRX HF (manual transmission, of course) and loved it. Ton of fun to drive, great on gas and you could park it anywhere. Haven't seen many of them in Texas (the huge trucks and SUVs around here are no match for a CRX in an accident), but I saw loads of 80s-era CRXs in Washington state north of Seattle. You might try looking through ads from around there.
 
2013-01-29 07:05:28 PM
Electric emergency brake makes no sense to me

www.bmwblog.com

In an emergency I want to pull directly on a cable attached to the brake calipers, not rely on the electrical system
 
2013-01-29 07:06:05 PM

Wellon Dowd: MindStalker: In before Manual/Automatic argument!

There is no argument. Unless you're both a spastic and an idiot, manual is better.


For cars made before 2005 I agree BUT with tiptronic type transmissions or double shift gearbox etc many higher end cars (and soon most cars) actually can 'shift' more precise, faster and accurate than even the Aryton Senna.
 
2013-01-29 07:07:12 PM
25.media.tumblr.com

KidneyStone: dahmers love zombie: I wonder if I could get a car outfitted with a 3-speed column shifter.  I could leave the keys in it all the time with zero worry.

THREE ON THE TREE!

"'68 Ford Fairlane two door, blue, with a black vinyl top, three-speed on the tree, and an FM radio in it."
 
2013-01-29 07:09:26 PM

tricycleracer: grinding_journalist: The "cash for clunkers" debacle all but killed the market for not-beat-to-shiat older, cheap, somewhat reliable cars. The only cars I find in my area that might fit his qualifications all have some sort of serious mechanical defect that would require work before the car was legal to drive or title, or are deathtrappy enough that he probably doesn't want one for his kid.

Go used car shopping in Florida.  No road salt and below-average incomes create plenty of cheap used cars in good condition.


Cheap, yes. But you're wrong about the salt-free cars. There is plenty of salt in Florida. Be careful of cars from coastal cities (and there are a lot of those)--the salt is in the air. Have family in Destin and Fort Walton and their cars get rusty pretty quickly, especially around the windows and trim. Inland you're probably okay, but be careful and really check any Florida cars out before you buy.
 
2013-01-29 07:17:54 PM

Feral_and_Preposterous: tricycleracer: grinding_journalist: Go used car shopping in Florida.  No road salt and below-average incomes create plenty of cheap used cars in good condition.

Cheap, yes. But you're wrong about the salt-free cars. There is plenty of salt in Florida. Be careful of cars from coastal cities (and there are a lot of those)--the salt is in the air. Have family in Destin and Fort Walton and their cars get rusty pretty quickly, especially around the windows and trim. Inland you're probably okay, but be careful and really check any Florida cars out before you buy.


You want to buy in New Mexico. The only things that kill cars out there are hot sun and drunk drivers.
 
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