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(FastCo Design)   In the year 2000, we'll all be yakking away on our Snow White phones, according to Apple   (fastcodesign.com) divider line 34
    More: PSA, tablets, Xerox PARC, design language, semantics, Apple logo, draw backs, production designer, Electrolux  
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6692 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Jan 2013 at 10:05 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-29 10:02:59 AM
That's a pretty good article on Design Engineering and project management. The slideshow is the worst thing I've seen since subbys mom tried to wear spandex.
 
2013-01-29 10:11:10 AM
I am sure my nerdy 10 year old self in 1987 would have thought those designs were really rad.
 
2013-01-29 10:18:20 AM
I dig the "portrait" orientation on the Snow White 2 Americana... better watch out Samsung, you might be forced to do triangle screens like that episode of The Office.
 
2013-01-29 10:37:29 AM
www.fastcodesign.com
If those were all hot-swappable drives/accessory modules in a dock, I think that'd be really slick.
 
2013-01-29 11:18:43 AM
4.bp.blogspot.com

approves
 
2013-01-29 11:24:20 AM

Theaetetus: [www.fastcodesign.com image 685x500]
If those were all hot-swappable drives/accessory modules in a dock, I think that'd be really slick.


I was thinking the same thing. That's a design I would be interested in seeing nowdays. How cool would it be if every board on the computer had an enclosure like that? Even a video card would be a breeze, not hot-swappable, of course(Unless it had onboard video just for swaps), but you power down, open the enclosure and swap cards. It would be faster than now.

I'd be interested in an updated version of this design. Modular is cool....
 
2013-01-29 11:45:11 AM

Mikey1969: Theaetetus: [www.fastcodesign.com image 685x500]
If those were all hot-swappable drives/accessory modules in a dock, I think that'd be really slick.

I was thinking the same thing. That's a design I would be interested in seeing nowdays. How cool would it be if every board on the computer had an enclosure like that? Even a video card would be a breeze, not hot-swappable, of course(Unless it had onboard video just for swaps), but you power down, open the enclosure and swap cards. It would be faster than now.


You could still potentially do hot-swappable with a video card (mind you, not with the 1984 tech they were using), just understanding that you're headless for the short time it's disconnected. You can hot-plug external USB and Thunderbolt GPUs.
 
2013-01-29 12:08:59 PM

Theaetetus: [www.fastcodesign.com image 685x500]
If those were all hot-swappable drives/accessory modules in a dock, I think that'd be really slick.


I was thinking the same thing.
 
2013-01-29 12:46:08 PM
I'm reading this on a Newton, so I'm really getting a kick...
 
2013-01-29 12:50:12 PM

Tr0mBoNe: That's a pretty good article on Design Engineering and project management. The slideshow is the worst thing I've seen since subbys mom tried to wear spandex.


Yeah screw the pics, the article is chock full of knowledge from a DE stand point that is fantastic. Especially the discussions on why designs failed. So many casual articles are about why something is awesome, typically you have to turn to text books and the like to get a run down on how to turn failures into wins.
 
2013-01-29 12:50:35 PM

Mikey1969: I was thinking the same thing. That's a design I would be interested in seeing nowdays. How cool would it be if every board on the computer had an enclosure like that?


TI did exactly that with the TI-99/4 peripheral expansion box.  The device drivers were held in firmware in the expansion module itself so when they were connected they immediately became available to any software that needed it.   This is 1979 btw.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-01-29 12:55:55 PM

dameron: Mikey1969: I was thinking the same thing. That's a design I would be interested in seeing nowdays. How cool would it be if every board on the computer had an enclosure like that?

TI did exactly that with the TI-99/4 peripheral expansion box.  The device drivers were held in firmware in the expansion module itself so when they were connected they immediately became available to any software that needed it.   This is 1979 btw.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 688x412]


Which were just a consumer level of the VME architecture made for the space program and the american military. It doesn't explain why the same TI-86 calculators still cost 50 bucks.
 
2013-01-29 01:02:09 PM

Theaetetus: Mikey1969: Theaetetus: [www.fastcodesign.com image 685x500]
If those were all hot-swappable drives/accessory modules in a dock, I think that'd be really slick.

I was thinking the same thing. That's a design I would be interested in seeing nowdays. How cool would it be if every board on the computer had an enclosure like that? Even a video card would be a breeze, not hot-swappable, of course(Unless it had onboard video just for swaps), but you power down, open the enclosure and swap cards. It would be faster than now.

You could still potentially do hot-swappable with a video card (mind you, not with the 1984 tech they were using), just understanding that you're headless for the short time it's disconnected. You can hot-plug external USB and Thunderbolt GPUs.


I bet with a little spacing, operating temps would be nothing.

Then again the tradeoff is that we have PC motherboards that are compatible with a wide array of parts. Something like this might have a screwy proprietary motherboard or take special low-profile RAM, something like that. It would still be sweet though. I'm sure with work and expansion cards, someone could build a custom one for themselves. I would just end up throwing shiat across the room at some point, but someone could do it...
 
2013-01-29 01:05:50 PM

dameron: Mikey1969: I was thinking the same thing. That's a design I would be interested in seeing nowdays. How cool would it be if every board on the computer had an enclosure like that?

TI did exactly that with the TI-99/4 peripheral expansion box.  The device drivers were held in firmware in the expansion module itself so when they were connected they immediately became available to any software that needed it.   This is 1979 btw.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 688x412]


This totally makes sense in that application(At least the NASA part the other poster was talking about), in any lind of industrial or scientific application, component swapping(Even if not hot swap) should be as modular as possible.

Also, a system like this could easily expanded to be a home automation/multiroom DVR type of setup.

Normally Apple can eat a dick as far as I'm concerned, but this one could have had potential. As for TI, what do they make besides calculators anymore? I honestly can't think of what I've seen their name on.
 
2013-01-29 01:34:18 PM

Mikey1969: dameron: Mikey1969: I was thinking the same thing. That's a design I would be interested in seeing nowdays. How cool would it be if every board on the computer had an enclosure like that?

TI did exactly that with the TI-99/4 peripheral expansion box.  The device drivers were held in firmware in the expansion module itself so when they were connected they immediately became available to any software that needed it.   This is 1979 btw.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 688x412]

This totally makes sense in that application(At least the NASA part the other poster was talking about), in any lind of industrial or scientific application, component swapping(Even if not hot swap) should be as modular as possible.

Also, a system like this could easily expanded to be a home automation/multiroom DVR type of setup.

Normally Apple can eat a dick as far as I'm concerned, but this one could have had potential. As for TI, what do they make besides calculators anymore? I honestly can't think of what I've seen their name on.


They do a lot of system on a chip stuff. You wouldn't see their name unless you pop open some other device and look at the ICs.
 
2013-01-29 02:22:43 PM
www.fastcodesign.com

The one button mouse caught on. The two button keyboard? Not as lucky.
 
2013-01-29 02:26:14 PM

Mikey1969: As for TI, what do they make besides calculators anymore? I honestly can't think of what I've seen their name on.


An absolute assload of microcontrollers, DSPs, processors, amplifiers, etc, etc. It's just that their names aren't on consumer products anymore, they're inside them.
 
Slu
2013-01-29 02:30:39 PM
Every single thing about that website sucked.
 
2013-01-29 02:37:02 PM
Speaking of design, hiding text under images is generally not considered good design, Fast Company.
 
2013-01-29 02:55:01 PM

ProfessorOhki: Mikey1969: As for TI, what do they make besides calculators anymore? I honestly can't think of what I've seen their name on.

An absolute assload of microcontrollers, DSPs, processors, amplifiers, etc, etc. It's just that their names aren't on consumer products anymore, they're inside them.


That makes sense. I knew they were still in business, just not what they were making, I knew about the chips of course, just not that they were pretty much ONLY making those. Pretty nice way to stay in business...
 
2013-01-29 04:27:31 PM

ProfessorOhki: [www.fastcodesign.com image 687x500]

The one button mouse caught on. The two button keyboard? Not as lucky.


Says you00100 0 01
 
2013-01-29 04:28:13 PM
Heh... Apparently Fark now has a binary to ascii converter?
 
2013-01-29 04:45:35 PM

Theaetetus: Heh... Apparently Fark now has a binary to ascii converter?


Yes they00100 0 ^Y^[11
 
2013-01-29 04:53:30 PM

Theaetetus: ProfessorOhki: [www.fastcodesign.com image 687x500]

The one button mouse caught on. The two button keyboard? Not as lucky.

Says you00100 0 01


images.forwardedfunnies.com

/hot
//that's why it has vents
 
2013-01-29 04:54:14 PM
Other things we won't be doing is, apparently, viewing this article on a phone browser.
 
2013-01-29 06:00:49 PM
Incredibly, Aple's 1982 "laptop" was more spot-on than the 1984 concept.

www.fastcodesign.com
 
2013-01-29 06:12:11 PM

ProfessorOhki: Theaetetus: ProfessorOhki: [www.fastcodesign.com image 687x500]

The one button mouse caught on. The two button keyboard? Not as lucky.

Says you00100 0 01

[images.forwardedfunnies.com image 705x510]

/hot
//that's why it has vents


i18.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-29 08:07:32 PM
Even though the landline is becoming a thing of the past, having a built in tablet to take down messages is absolute genius.

/5 to 10 years ago I could easily see getting one
//especially since we don't have call display on our landline
 
2013-01-29 08:22:27 PM

Tr0mBoNe: VME architecture made for the space program and the american military


Does your ass ever get tired of you pulling so much shiat out if it?
 
2013-01-29 09:10:56 PM

Mikey1969: ProfessorOhki: Mikey1969: As for TI, what do they make besides calculators anymore? I honestly can't think of what I've seen their name on.

An absolute assload of microcontrollers, DSPs, processors, amplifiers, etc, etc. It's just that their names aren't on consumer products anymore, they're inside them.

That makes sense. I knew they were still in business, just not what they were making, I knew about the chips of course, just not that they were pretty much ONLY making those. Pretty nice way to stay in business...


From Wiki: After the acquisition of National Semiconductor in 2011, the company has a combined portfolio of nearly 45,000 analog products and customer design tools,[8] making it the world's largest maker of analog technology components. In 2011, Texas Instruments ranked 175 in the Fortune 500. TI is made up of two main divisions: Semiconductors (SC) and Educational Technology (ET) of which Semiconductor products account for approximately 96% of TI's revenue.

Sort of like how 3M doesn't make the products you buy, it makes the products you buy better. It's funny that we think of them only for their calculators, when that is less than 4% of what the company does. Then again, lots of people would assume that IBM doesn't do anything these days, since they divested of making PCs.
 
2013-01-29 09:59:18 PM

ProfessorOhki: Mikey1969: As for TI, what do they make besides calculators anymore? I honestly can't think of what I've seen their name on.

An absolute assload of microcontrollers, DSPs, processors, amplifiers, etc, etc. It's just that their names aren't on consumer products anymore, they're inside them.


Yup. The Kindle Fire tablets and Galaxy Nexus phones both run TI OMAP chips.
 
2013-01-29 11:33:46 PM

Mikey1969: Theaetetus: [www.fastcodesign.com image 685x500]
If those were all hot-swappable drives/accessory modules in a dock, I think that'd be really slick.

I was thinking the same thing. That's a design I would be interested in seeing nowdays. How cool would it be if every board on the computer had an enclosure like that? Even a video card would be a breeze, not hot-swappable, of course(Unless it had onboard video just for swaps), but you power down, open the enclosure and swap cards. It would be faster than now.

I'd be interested in an updated version of this design. Modular is cool....


http://assets.hardwaresphere.com/uploads/2009/12/ThermalTake-Level-10- BMW-designed-PC-case.jpg
 
2013-01-29 11:34:47 PM
Ok so my iPhone decided not to post the HTML on that so copy and paste the address
 
2013-01-30 01:22:10 AM
The modular design is lovely. Did you notice that one of the modules was an Apple II? The world would have looked very different had things gone this direction: "Bob, check out the Atari module I got for my Mac!" "Meh. I've got both the Amiga and the CoCo modules." If they could have run in parallel, with simple screen switching or something like DesqView (gotta think of what could be done back in the day). That would have been cool. Expensive as can be, but cool.
 
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