If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Consumerist)   Barnes & Noble begins closing a third of its stores on news that pretty much everyone knows how to order from Amazon   (consumerist.com) divider line 79
    More: Followup, A Barnes & Noble  
•       •       •

1813 clicks; posted to Business » on 29 Jan 2013 at 10:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



79 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
hej
2013-01-29 10:22:25 AM
But where will people go to sit around toying with their laptop, study for classes, do a bunch of paperwork for their business, or otherwise do crap they could just as easily be doing in their livingroom?
 
2013-01-29 10:23:28 AM
here is a link to a better article so you dont have to visit that worthless site

http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2013/01/28/barnes--noble - exec-plans-more-store-closings
 
2013-01-29 10:23:29 AM
My wife loves her Nook (that I rooted years ago), and the B&N near us in Burlington, MA is usually packed when we go there. Given the only thing in easy walking distance is a Chili's, people are going to this spot to go to the B&N.

/wish there were more seats near the cafe area
 
2013-01-29 10:26:04 AM
Bookstores are 1 of the few stores that I actually enjoy going to. This is not unexpected at all, but still makes me sad.
 
2013-01-29 10:29:45 AM

LL316: Bookstores are 1 of the few stores that I actually enjoy going to. This is not unexpected at all, but still makes me sad.


Yeah, the Internet is amazing and wonderful and all, but it's a shame to see bookstores going.
 
2013-01-29 10:32:48 AM

hej: But where will people go to sit around toying with their laptop, study for classes, do a bunch of paperwork for their business, or otherwise do crap they could just as easily be doing in their livingroom?


Coffee houses.
 
2013-01-29 10:34:51 AM
Two things can save the stores, strippers and beer. For reasons that are not entirely clear you go to the mall with your wife to pick up a few things and she decides that while your there she might as well get a few bras. So you can stand around holding her purse and looking like a perv for two hours or walk around the mall. Sears is a lot of fun but how long can you look socket sets and car batteries. Radio Shack is completely awesome except for the stuff they sell and the creepy guy who is always trying to get your phone number. Victoria's Secret is a great way to spend the afternoon but the judge says you can't go back fro two more years. That leaves the book store, comfy seats, coffee and something to read. Unfortunately a cup of coffee doesn't pay the rent. Take out the books, sell higher margin beverages and give them a reason to come more often. Profit
 
2013-01-29 10:36:18 AM
Used to read a lot of fantasy (Eddings, Feist, Duncan, Donaldson etc) as a teenager and I loved going in to the book store to see what was new on the shelves - Judging a book by it's cover was the only way I ever found anything new to read (sad I know)

Stopped by a B&N the other day - they had like the 4th book in a series of 6, 1000 different books for the same area (Star Wars)... certainly nothing that made me want to stop and pick up a new series - which even if you found something you wouldnt be able to complete without going on line.... and if I'm going to go online I might as well get it cheaper somewhere else.
 
2013-01-29 10:45:55 AM

Debeo Summa Credo: LL316: Bookstores are 1 of the few stores that I actually enjoy going to. This is not unexpected at all, but still makes me sad.

Yeah, the Internet is amazing and wonderful and all, but it's a shame to see bookstores going.


Yup. That's one of my favorite things to do- get a cup of tea and browse the book store. I've found so many great books that way that I wouldn't have found otherwise.
 
2013-01-29 10:46:20 AM

Cheron: Two things can save the stores, strippers and beer. For reasons that are not entirely clear you go to the mall with your wife to pick up a few things and she decides that while your there she might as well get a few bras. So you can stand around holding her purse and looking like a perv for two hours or walk around the mall. Sears is a lot of fun but how long can you look socket sets and car batteries. Radio Shack is completely awesome except for the stuff they sell and the creepy guy who is always trying to get your phone number. Victoria's Secret is a great way to spend the afternoon but the judge says you can't go back fro two more years. That leaves the book store, comfy seats, coffee and something to read. Unfortunately a cup of coffee doesn't pay the rent. Take out the books, sell higher margin beverages and give them a reason to come more often. Profit


This is not a terrible idea. The strippers might cause legal problems in some jurisdictions, but turning the stores into faux-Ivy League bars wouldn't be a horrible notion.
 
2013-01-29 10:46:29 AM
To be honest, books lend themselves extremely well to online sale. I think sooner or later the industry standard is every book released will offer at least one chapter as a free ePub download (like how some paperbacks have a preview of upcoming releases as their last 20 pages) to pull down and browse. Then if you like it you buy the book in whichever form you desire.

Beside used book stores seem to be doing okay, at least around here. They all sell on Amazon and the clerks keep themselves busy fulfilling internet orders during the day. They've become small warehouses that happen to let the public shelf browse. The days of the massive stripmall anchor bookstore are passing away though.
 
2013-01-29 10:55:10 AM
Before the big chain book stores there were small local stores. For me it was Ziesing Brothers' Book Emporium which started life as a small store front. It grew gradually taking over room after room in the brown stones until it was a maze of rooms. The shelves were rough cut pine and there was always some out of the way nook to explore and find new books. Big chains came in an beat them on price and now they are getting beat by internet stores, circle of life
 
2013-01-29 10:59:08 AM
. . .not everybody.

There's my mother for example.

She's 57 years old and firmly of the mindset that computers are for kids and just a toy. Back in the 90's she called the internet a fad. She didn't want to get me a PC when I was in high school because she was sure they'd be "discontinued, just like they discontinued the Atari".

She's steadfastly refused any attempt to enter the modern age. My father tried buying her a laptop once as a Christmas present. . .she boxed it up, didn't touch it, then regifted it to me the next Christmas.

She tried to get a job once, back in the 70's she worked as a secretary for years, before quitting to be a stay-at-home mom when I was born. She tried to find clerical work 5 or 6 years go, only to get upset that every place wanted her to use a computer. She is befuddled at why offices don't use mimeographs and typewriters anymore when "they got the job done, instead of being broken down all the time like computers".

Any time a customer service person tells her to go online to check something or get something, she tells them off. If she can't do it in person or over the phone, she doesn't do it. She still laments that Sears doesn't produce their annual catalog anymore.

She is a regular at our local Barnes and Noble, since she's also a huge bibliophile.

I presume that B&N's business model at this point is for her to single-handedly keep that location open.
 
2013-01-29 11:01:14 AM
I used to like going to B&N. I'd get myself all sorts of books, both fiction and nonfiction. But now, every time I come into the place, someone's trying to shove a Nook into my hands.

They're not alone in this. Right around the time all the bean-counters decided "minimize expenses" meant severely cut down on services and quality, they also decided to turn the few remaining employees into aggressive sell-bots.

You know what all these places have in common? They're hemorrhaging money. Take a look at Best Buy. Take a look at Radio Shack. Now look at B&N.

Just let me come into the store, browse around a bit, choose what I want to buy, pay, and leave. If I want to interact with anyone, I'll come to you. I don't want to upgrade my phone. I don't want a new tablet. I'm not interesting in switching Internet providers. Those "deluxe" HDMI cables are overpriced and you know it.

It's not the employees' fault. I know a few of them outside of their jobs. They're required to do this. If any of you is upper management at one of these franchises, knock it the fark off.
 
2013-01-29 11:03:11 AM
B&N is taking advantage of this manipulation to raise prices, reduce offerings, and in general try to prepare their own golden parachutes. I hope this does not lead to:

A) a surge in price of new books due to online oligarchy/monopoly
B) the downfall of books in general as a cultural staple
 
2013-01-29 11:10:43 AM

Sir Not Sure The Unscannable: B&N is taking advantage of this manipulation to raise prices, reduce offerings, and in general try to prepare their own golden parachutes. I hope this does not lead to:

A) a surge in price of new books due to online oligarchy/monopoly
B) the downfall of books in general as a cultural staple


fark, that is what is going to happen. I love paying less than 10$ for a book online.

My Dad told me how he went to B&N recently with my mother. He went the magazines to see what he could find, and found something he kind of liked. The farking magazine cost 11.99$ He put it down and found another, it was 6.99$. He got fed up and went to the books and found a paper back for 9.99$ but was still unhappy with how expensive even a paperback was. He isn't going to B&N anytime soon.

Me either. I live near an amazon factory or shipping center or whatever and pretty much always get next day delivery.
 
2013-01-29 11:13:43 AM

hej: But where will people go to sit around toying with their laptop, study for classes, do a bunch of paperwork for their business, or otherwise do crap they could just as easily be doing in their livingroom?


The library?
 
2013-01-29 11:17:22 AM
Gonna miss the smell of bookstores and browsing around physically rather than clicking through while constantly being suggested top sellers and recommendations. Too bad my kids will never have the same experience, nor will they likely be interested to.

A block away from my house is a "Pages for All Ages" I used to frequent as a kid that closed 5-6 years ago. If they were open I would go all the time... to answer the Boobieser up there, walking around book store sections is a bit more fun than browsing a website slouched over in your office chair.

Oh well.
 
2013-01-29 11:20:52 AM

LL316: Bookstores are 1 of the few stores that I actually enjoy going to. This is not unexpected at all, but still makes me sad.


lots of this,
and to boot, B/N is the only B&M retailer around this area that sells all/most Criterion BluRays.

fml
 
2013-01-29 11:31:45 AM
Look at Barnes & Noble's inventory turns and you'll know why their business model is failing.

The strange thing is that their management of inventory is only slightly improved over 2003. I dd an analysis then that put them at 2.8 turns (vs. 2.9 today). Borders at the time was 2.0. By contrast, Costco is at about 11 -- and they don't sell ebooks.
 
2013-01-29 11:33:31 AM
I hope this does not mean trouble for the B&N website, their connection to used book sellers for out of print books is 100 times better than Amazon's.
 
2013-01-29 11:41:04 AM
The Barnes & Noble near me closed over a year ago. I truly miss having a bookstore nearby. We do have Powell's about 40 minutes away.

My kids loved going to the B&N, browsing and discovering new books & authors. Yes there is the library, but for kids it seems discovery is much easier in a bookstore. Maybe it is the way books are displayed/grouped in a store as compared to rows and rows of shelves in the library. Covers catch their eye, tables set with groups of similarly themed books, etc.
 
2013-01-29 11:51:42 AM
Closing 1/3 of their stores over 10 years?  Sounds like they're a little overconfident.  I'd bet that turns into 1/2 of their stores in 5 years.
 
2013-01-29 11:52:05 AM

Omnivorous: Look at Barnes & Noble's inventory turns and you'll know why their business model is failing.

The strange thing is that their management of inventory is only slightly improved over 2003. I dd an analysis then that put them at 2.8 turns (vs. 2.9 today). Borders at the time was 2.0. By contrast, Costco is at about 11 -- and they don't sell ebooks.


Having worked for 5-6 years as a receiving clerk at B&N (#2843, RIP), I can tell you that inventory management at bookstores is a nightmare. The orgy of waste that happens at the hands of consumers via the mass market/periodical "stripping" process is obscene; don't even get me started on the calendar receiving/discount/strip/return cycle every year, it makes me sick just thinking about it.
 
2013-01-29 12:06:42 PM

enry: My wife loves her Nook (that I rooted years ago), and the B&N near us in Burlington, MA is usually packed when we go there. Given the only thing in easy walking distance is a Chili's, people are going to this spot to go to the B&N.

/wish there were more seats near the cafe area


It's also less than a half mile from a huge mall and bunch of other restaurants and stores. It sure as heck isn't isolated as you claim.
 
2013-01-29 12:13:05 PM

GreenAdder: I used to like going to B&N. I'd get myself all sorts of books, both fiction and nonfiction. But now, every time I come into the place, someone's trying to shove a Nook into my hands.

They're not alone in this. Right around the time all the bean-counters decided "minimize expenses" meant severely cut down on services and quality, they also decided to turn the few remaining employees into aggressive sell-bots.

You know what all these places have in common? They're hemorrhaging money. Take a look at Best Buy. Take a look at Radio Shack. Now look at B&N.

Just let me come into the store, browse around a bit, choose what I want to buy, pay, and leave. If I want to interact with anyone, I'll come to you. I don't want to upgrade my phone. I don't want a new tablet. I'm not interesting in switching Internet providers. Those "deluxe" HDMI cables are overpriced and you know it.

It's not the employees' fault. I know a few of them outside of their jobs. They're required to do this. If any of you is upper management at one of these franchises, knock it the fark off.


This. The problem isn't that your employees aren't being aggressive enough, the problem is the model is evolving. Figure out how to ride the wave instead of tying everyone to anchors.
 
2013-01-29 12:15:00 PM

TheSelphie: enry: My wife loves her Nook (that I rooted years ago), and the B&N near us in Burlington, MA is usually packed when we go there. Given the only thing in easy walking distance is a Chili's, people are going to this spot to go to the B&N.

/wish there were more seats near the cafe area

It's also less than a half mile from a huge mall and bunch of other restaurants and stores. It sure as heck isn't isolated as you claim.


It's not like it was in the mall or in easy walking distance. You have to cross a 4-lane road with no crosswalks. It's not isolated, but you have to make a conscious decision to go there rather than like going to the mall and just wandering through various stores.
 
2013-01-29 12:23:14 PM
Maybe if they didn't sell their videos at full MSRP, they wouldn't be wasting 15% of their floor space on stuff that doesn't sell and could put something interesting in there. Like maybe the high-class bar mentioned earlier.
 
hej
2013-01-29 12:28:33 PM

GreenAdder: I used to like going to B&N. I'd get myself all sorts of books, both fiction and nonfiction. But now, every time I come into the place, someone's trying to shove a Nook into my hands.


The Nook is the only thing that separated B&N from Borders in terms of their fate. Marketing it like mad is pretty much their only hope of survival.
 
2013-01-29 12:35:57 PM
B&N's bargain selection has gotten real shiatty as of late. Meanwhile my independent bookstore just had a massive expansion of theirs.
 
2013-01-29 12:36:51 PM
FTFA: A Barnes & Noble spokeswoman issued the following statement in regards to WSJ's article, saying this is not an unusual move for the company: Blah Blah Blah

Translation: Crap, we've been caught before our rich shareholders can get their money out. Now we need to make it look like its all part of the plan.

/best friend has worked part-time at B&N for 7 years because management can't get its collective-head out of its a$$ and promote her.
 
2013-01-29 12:41:03 PM
Two years ago I ran into their  "don't price-match their own website" thing. So what reason would I have to drive 15 miles to pay a higher price? Haven't been in a B&N since.
 
2013-01-29 12:45:33 PM

kudayta: Cheron: Two things can save the stores, strippers and beer. For reasons that are not entirely clear you go to the mall with your wife to pick up a few things and she decides that while your there she might as well get a few bras. So you can stand around holding her purse and looking like a perv for two hours or walk around the mall. Sears is a lot of fun but how long can you look socket sets and car batteries. Radio Shack is completely awesome except for the stuff they sell and the creepy guy who is always trying to get your phone number. Victoria's Secret is a great way to spend the afternoon but the judge says you can't go back fro two more years. That leaves the book store, comfy seats, coffee and something to read. Unfortunately a cup of coffee doesn't pay the rent. Take out the books, sell higher margin beverages and give them a reason to come more often. Profit

This is not a terrible idea. The strippers might cause legal problems in some jurisdictions, but turning the stores into faux-Ivy League bars wouldn't be a horrible notion.


What if, instead of strippers, you went with a "hot librarian" theme?

4.bp.blogspot.com

twimg0-a.akamaihd.net

4.bp.blogspot.com

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-01-29 12:52:53 PM

Parthenogenetic: kudayta: Cheron: Two things can save the stores, strippers and beer. For reasons that are not entirely clear you go to the mall with your wife to pick up a few things and she decides that while your there she might as well get a few bras. So you can stand around holding her purse and looking like a perv for two hours or walk around the mall. Sears is a lot of fun but how long can you look socket sets and car batteries. Radio Shack is completely awesome except for the stuff they sell and the creepy guy who is always trying to get your phone number. Victoria's Secret is a great way to spend the afternoon but the judge says you can't go back fro two more years. That leaves the book store, comfy seats, coffee and something to read. Unfortunately a cup of coffee doesn't pay the rent. Take out the books, sell higher margin beverages and give them a reason to come more often. Profit

This is not a terrible idea. The strippers might cause legal problems in some jurisdictions, but turning the stores into faux-Ivy League bars wouldn't be a horrible notion.

What if, instead of strippers, you went with a "hot librarian" theme?

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 201x251]

[twimg0-a.akamaihd.net image 500x603]

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 751x1024]

[25.media.tumblr.com image 480x640]


I want to check out #4 and flip through her pages behind the stacks.
 
2013-01-29 01:01:45 PM

enry: My wife loves her Nook (that I rooted years ago), and the B&N near us in Burlington, MA is usually packed when we go there. Given the only thing in easy walking distance is a Chili's, people are going to this spot to go to the B&N.

/wish there were more seats near the cafe area


A friend manages a B&N - she said she is quietly getting rid of all the comfy chairs in the store and covering up the electrical outlets in the cafe to get rid of the people who spend thier ENTIRE day hanging out at her store.
 
2013-01-29 01:02:52 PM
I've got best buy on my company dead pool...
Sears as the long shot.
 
2013-01-29 01:06:31 PM
I don't every find hidden gems online. Its only in a book store where I'll randomly read a chapter or a part that I have found some really good books. I'll be sad to see brick and mortar stores ago. I best most of you will too, unless you're a fat Total Fark closet case. But then, who cares what you think?
 
2013-01-29 01:21:57 PM

Debeo Summa Credo: LL316: Bookstores are 1 of the few stores that I actually enjoy going to. This is not unexpected at all, but still makes me sad.

Yeah, the Internet is amazing and wonderful and all, but it's a shame to see bookstores going.


From what I've seen, Half Priced Books is still doing well. The ones I've been to (In WI & OH) don't have coffee bars, wi-fi, or any other stupid things that the retail chains use to reel in customers. Just books, other assorted media, and a large clearance section of individual books. Not a section with 30 copies of twenty different titles. I've found some of my favorite books (ones I otherwise wouldn't known about, or bought) for a buck or two there.

As far as retail chains, the only time I've ever been to one in the last 20 years, was when I had a coupon for a book that they had listed in their inventory on-line that, with discount, was comparable to Amazon. And even then, most of the time I didn't purchase anything because the book wasn't actually in-stock or was previously read by someone with food-soiled hands.
 
2013-01-29 01:23:59 PM
^^ Sorry the above store is called "Half Price Books". I have no idea how I missed that in preview.
 
2013-01-29 01:24:35 PM
It's hard to browse Amazon for fiction books since there are millions available, even when going by genre. Does anyone know a good site that helps narrow the focus a little? Non-fiction is easier since you typically have a subject in mind already

Browsing the stacks at B&N can help pick a book since you can hit up your favorite genre and see what's popular (because they'll only shelve the popular stuff). But last time I was at B&N I found the selection was lacking and I didn't see anything worth paying list price for. And I did compare prices to Amazon who was 1/3 or more discounted.
 
2013-01-29 01:29:32 PM

mcreadyblue: enry: My wife loves her Nook (that I rooted years ago), and the B&N near us in Burlington, MA is usually packed when we go there. Given the only thing in easy walking distance is a Chili's, people are going to this spot to go to the B&N.

/wish there were more seats near the cafe area

A friend manages a B&N - she said she is quietly getting rid of all the comfy chairs in the store and covering up the electrical outlets in the cafe to get rid of the people who spend thier ENTIRE day hanging out at her store.


B&N the wife works at has special locks on the outlets that only the cleaning service can open. Prior to that, I'd see fatties literally wedged in the aisle, sitting on the floor, overlapping into the shelves on either side, to use their laptop while plugged in to the column.
 
2013-01-29 01:37:22 PM

Gig103: It's hard to browse Amazon for fiction books since there are millions available, even when going by genre. Does anyone know a good site that helps narrow the focus a little? Non-fiction is easier since you typically have a subject in mind already


Wait for the usual monthy book thread. Most farkers are morans but dang are they well read.
 
2013-01-29 01:38:15 PM

enry: My wife loves her Nook (that I rooted years ago), and the B&N near us in Burlington, MA is usually packed when we go there. Given the only thing in easy walking distance is a Chili's, people are going to this spot to go to the B&N.

/wish there were more seats near the cafe area


How hard was it to root the Nook? I got a Simple Touch for Xmas and I'll like to crack it, but I don't want to brick the thing.
 
2013-01-29 01:46:34 PM

DSF6969: enry: My wife loves her Nook (that I rooted years ago), and the B&N near us in Burlington, MA is usually packed when we go there. Given the only thing in easy walking distance is a Chili's, people are going to this spot to go to the B&N.

/wish there were more seats near the cafe area

How hard was it to root the Nook? I got a Simple Touch for Xmas and I'll like to crack it, but I don't want to brick the thing.


Piece of cake. I've even "rolled back" 2 to their original condition. One because I wasn't paying attention to what I was doing and then re-rooted it. The other because the person who paid me $40 to root it didn't like it as a tablet and paid me another $15 to put it back. A fool and his money...
As far as I know it's almost impossible to brick it. There's plenty of tutorials on YouTube with links to everything you need. It's simple enough to download the software so don't waste money on the $50 kits that they sell, micro SD cards are really cheap.
 
2013-01-29 01:46:47 PM

DSF6969: enry: My wife loves her Nook (that I rooted years ago), and the B&N near us in Burlington, MA is usually packed when we go there. Given the only thing in easy walking distance is a Chili's, people are going to this spot to go to the B&N.

/wish there were more seats near the cafe area

How hard was it to root the Nook? I got a Simple Touch for Xmas and I'll like to crack it, but I don't want to brick the thing.


Not sure about the Simple Touch, but I rooted two older Nooks pretty easily. Both required a memory card.
 
2013-01-29 01:58:18 PM
People need to get over their nostalgia.

1. Books stores' inventory is limited to what they think will churn; the majority of inventory are new releases and books by the most popular authors.

2. Until Amazon, you used to have to pay near full MSRP for new hardcovers, which could easily be over $30. I for one do not miss those days.
 
2013-01-29 02:15:07 PM
The news from me is when a customer has a shiatload stack of slected books to buy pre-Christmas and asks a harried store clerk a question about finding more, when she runs off with a nasty comment the books get dumped randomly and the order to get them from Amazon for a lot less gets placed in immediately.
 
2013-01-29 02:23:59 PM

Gig103: It's hard to browse Amazon for fiction books since there are millions available, even when going by genre. Does anyone know a good site that helps narrow the focus a little? Non-fiction is easier since you typically have a subject in mind already

Browsing the stacks at B&N can help pick a book since you can hit up your favorite genre and see what's popular (because they'll only shelve the popular stuff). But last time I was at B&N I found the selection was lacking and I didn't see anything worth paying list price for. And I did compare prices to Amazon who was 1/3 or more discounted.


goodreads.com is pretty good about it.
 
2013-01-29 02:24:03 PM

Sir Not Sure The Unscannable: B&N is taking advantage of this manipulation to raise prices, reduce offerings, and in general try to prepare their own golden parachutes. I hope this does not lead to:

A) a surge in price of new books due to online oligarchy/monopoly
B) the downfall of books in general as a cultural staple


A) is already happening because the Big 7 publishing houses are probably going to combine in a Voltron of Suck, and this fact is irrespective of how many book retailers there are. Print is dying, it's that simple, and book selling has always been a highly speculative business.

B) no, but I wouldn't keep the torch lit for traditional publishing forever. When someone figures out how to beat Amazon at their own game, then we'll see the next progression in publishing.
 
2013-01-29 03:00:55 PM

Silverstaff: . . .not everybody.

There's my mother for example.

She's 57 years old and firmly of the mindset that computers are for kids and just a toy. Back in the 90's she called the internet a fad. She didn't want to get me a PC when I was in high school because she was sure they'd be "discontinued, just like they discontinued the Atari".

She's steadfastly refused any attempt to enter the modern age. My father tried buying her a laptop once as a Christmas present. . .she boxed it up, didn't touch it, then regifted it to me the next Christmas.

She tried to get a job once, back in the 70's she worked as a secretary for years, before quitting to be a stay-at-home mom when I was born. She tried to find clerical work 5 or 6 years go, only to get upset that every place wanted her to use a computer. She is befuddled at why offices don't use mimeographs and typewriters anymore when "they got the job done, instead of being broken down all the time like computers".

Any time a customer service person tells her to go online to check something or get something, she tells them off. If she can't do it in person or over the phone, she doesn't do it. She still laments that Sears doesn't produce their annual catalog anymore.

She is a regular at our local Barnes and Noble, since she's also a huge bibliophile.

I presume that B&N's business model at this point is for her to single-handedly keep that location open.


You're probably closer to the truth than you realize. I wonder if Barnes and Noble will have even more problems down the road, after these kinds of people die off.
 
Displayed 50 of 79 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report