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(Huffington Post)   There's a sale at Penney's again   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 9
    More: Spiffy, J.C. Penney, The Practice, credit ratings, JCP, total sales, Izod, luxury vehicles, reversal  
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5131 clicks; posted to Business » on 28 Jan 2013 at 5:29 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-28 07:32:20 PM
2 votes:

msupf: And this is why we can't have nice things.

Every time I shopped there the employees were happier with the setup and not having to spend half their work week or more adjusting prices and signage. I was happy with the prices and the much more widely available service. I made it a point to shop there.


GendoIkari: As someone who works for a retailer that was watching this closely I weep. Dealing with a constant barrage of sales and coupons every week is a huge hassle not just for the customers but the employees; however, as this proves it's just part of the business. Apparently people want to get ripped off, as long as long as there is the illusion that they are somehow saving money.


They pay employees for more than standing around blocking the aisles. Changing signage is not the end of the world.

JC Penney's CEO screwed up big time. They didn't stop having sales... they just became more pretentious as "month long values" and confused shoppers who tend to have a short attention span. I guess a hundred years of hardcore consumerism wasn't enough for JCP.... they decided to become the "Apple" of retail, forgetting that what makes Apple able to do a lot of what they do is because they are Apple, not JC Penney.

There are consumers who aren't concerned with sales, or marked prices.... but why should they shop at your store over any other? Maybe because your moves have eliminated 80% of your customers from the floor? Beyond that, the customers JCP hoped to attract had little reason to flock to JCP.

Walmart doesn't have "sales" - they just have damn cheap prices; but then they've always had damn cheap prices. JCP went from a retailer where customers only bought stuff on sale because normal prices are considered too high, to a retailer that "just got rid of sales" - so what did they expect? Pretentiousness  won't pay the bills unless you are some obscene "in fashion" retailer that rich people are used to going to.

/Worked retail
2013-01-28 06:20:26 PM
2 votes:

DownDaRiver: I don't see all the all the grief with dealing with sales.
Someone enters a few key strokes, sends out the data to pricing databases at the stores, which automatically is the price when an item is scanned, then fires off the info to the stores. What, that probably takes all of about 2hrs per week.
At the stores, ya have to put a few signs around reflecting a sale and its discounted price. How long can it take one person walking around a store putting up signs? Another what, 2hrs per week if they are slow and stop to chit-chat along the way?
Hand out a few fliers to sales people so they know when a sale is in their department. 5mins tops per per week.
If it isn't this simple, it should be.


Mrs. Smurf occasionally helps with resigning. In a 14K sq ft store it takes 2 people upwards of 5 hours to process the new signage scheme, print the new signs, verify each sign to be removed, place new signs, verify new sign is correct and located according to the latest merchandising plan.

Going all digital would seem like a great idea until you realize that it would be done by corporate. Would you trust a corporate office to handle pricing signage when they would be completely removed from all repercussions when they fark it up? The same corporate office that regularly refuses to provide enough funding to keep toilet paper in the public restrooms.
2013-01-28 05:41:15 PM
2 votes:
And this is why we can't have nice things.

Every time I shopped there the employees were happier with the setup and not having to spend half their work week or more adjusting prices and signage. I was happy with the prices and the much more widely available service. I made it a point to shop there.
2013-01-29 12:02:46 AM
1 votes:
The problem that JCP ran into was that their shoppers were conditioned to buy on sales. Once they are they can't be convinced otherwise.
There are shops out there (usually higher end) that dont do sales and they are doing fine. However once they go after the sale siren call for short term gains they are doomed.
2013-01-28 06:57:04 PM
1 votes:

Smeggy Smurf: DownDaRiver: I don't see all the all the grief with dealing with sales.
Someone enters a few key strokes, sends out the data to pricing databases at the stores, which automatically is the price when an item is scanned, then fires off the info to the stores. What, that probably takes all of about 2hrs per week.
At the stores, ya have to put a few signs around reflecting a sale and its discounted price. How long can it take one person walking around a store putting up signs? Another what, 2hrs per week if they are slow and stop to chit-chat along the way?
Hand out a few fliers to sales people so they know when a sale is in their department. 5mins tops per per week.
If it isn't this simple, it should be.

Mrs. Smurf occasionally helps with resigning. In a 14K sq ft store it takes 2 people upwards of 5 hours to process the new signage scheme, print the new signs, verify each sign to be removed, place new signs, verify new sign is correct and located according to the latest merchandising plan.

Going all digital would seem like a great idea until you realize that it would be done by corporate. Would you trust a corporate office to handle pricing signage when they would be completely removed from all repercussions when they fark it up? The same corporate office that regularly refuses to provide enough funding to keep toilet paper in the public restrooms.


Not to mention having to execute planogram changes to reflect sales specials or having to rearrange racks/displays of clothing to separate similar items that do not share sale pricing. That can add quite a few extra hours per department, digital signage or not. Plus you have to add in physical price changes that usually have to executed weekly and completed by certain dates, along with removing old signage from expiring sales while creating new signage for permanent price changes.

/worked bad clothing retail(Dick's) and good clothing retail(Galyan's)
//sales setup sucks, and took away a lot of time from actual work
2013-01-28 06:06:36 PM
1 votes:
You can sell something for $20 regular price or sell the same thing for $20 on sale and people will prefer the item on sale because they think they are getting a better deal. It's a mental thing and it's buried too deep in our minds to change it at this point.
2013-01-28 05:55:09 PM
1 votes:

msupf: Every time I shopped there the employees were happier with the setup and not having to spend half their work week or more adjusting prices and signage.


My local Kohl's has gone digital for signage with exact prices.
2013-01-28 05:28:01 PM
1 votes:

syrynxx: Bad news! The fog is getting thicker.


encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com

and leon's getting laaaarger!
2013-01-28 05:20:59 PM
1 votes:
 
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