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(Salon)   Welcome to college. Here is an honest version of your syllabus   (salon.com) divider line 175
    More: Interesting, business hours  
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11434 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Jan 2013 at 3:04 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-28 03:05:47 PM  
No kidding. If even a quarter of the students in the room WANTED to be there I'd have a much better experience. Nowadays people are there because their parents/recruiter/parole officer told them to.

/I want to be here.
//but the damn kids really make it hard for me to get educated.
 
2013-01-28 03:10:58 PM  
Hey man, life is my college....

/obscure?
//likely not on Fark, hahah
 
2013-01-28 03:12:12 PM  
FTA: The rest of the period will be spent in class discussion, which by week three will have settled into an "Inside the Actor's Studio"-esque conversation between me and one or two consistently prepared students whom the rest of you will quietly despise.

Ouch. Mostly because that person was usually me. Not because I'm the smartest or most talkative, but because at the very least I'd bother to skim the chapter a few minutes before class and consult Wikipedia.
 
2013-01-28 03:15:18 PM  

MrEricSir: FTA: The rest of the period will be spent in class discussion, which by week three will have settled into an "Inside the Actor's Studio"-esque conversation between me and one or two consistently prepared students whom the rest of you will quietly despise.

Ouch. Mostly because that person was usually me. Not because I'm the smartest or most talkative, but because at the very least I'd bother to skim the chapter a few minutes before class and consult Wikipedia.


Having drinks with one of my profs from a previous semester a while ago. "Of course i always picked on you, even though you were slightly stoned half the time, you were the only farker in the class who could rub two thoughts together, i could sit there and read my powerpoints for the hour or have an interesting conversation with you, not like the rest of the class was going to get much out of either."
 
2013-01-28 03:15:56 PM  
Engineering/language course syllabus: here is what we're going to do and btw test is on Friday

Every other class I had: we're going to do all this stuff but we'll actually only do half of it and most of that will be in the last two weeks before the take home final
 
2013-01-28 03:18:33 PM  

ajgeek: No kidding. If even a quarter of the students in the room WANTED to be there I'd have a much better experience. Nowadays people are there because their parents/recruiter/parole officer told them to.

/I want to be here.
//but the damn kids really make it hard for me to get educated.


When I went to college, I did not want to take any of the "Core curriculum" classes. My AP high school classes were more involved, and some of which were actually offered THROUGH a university for college credit. It did not matter that I receive nearly perfect scores on most of my AP tests, the colleges decided not to accept the credits, or, they decided it sufficed a Junior level course - but - I STILL had to take the introductory level freshman course (makes perfect sense right).

Did I WANT to go to college? Yes. Did I WANT to take a bunch of BS courses until I got to the stuff that mattered and counted towards my major? No. I wasted a good 3 years of pointless crap before I got into anything decent and worth my time. I rarely ever showed up to class, yet was a 4.0 student. I am not a genius by any means, I just know to read the farking materials and do any assignments. For the most part, college is a memory game. A short term one. Most of my finals were not comprehensive but just the last part of the semester's material.

You want to see a fake syllabus? It looks like this.

1.) Here are a bunch of books for the course. I will probably only use 1, but I am going to include some that I personally wrote and it is REALLY expensive in the bookstore.
2.) You don't really have to show up to my class, I really don't care if you do. If you do show up, be on time and don't annoy me.
3.) I won't grade your stuff, the TA(s) will.
4.) Don't complain about trivial things.

This applies to pretty much every course ever in college. The first year, I was there right on time to every class, until I realized that was a colossal waste of time and energy. I could instead read and absorb the text or slides of the class and accomplish a semester's worth of material in a matter of weeks and then have a ridiculous amount of time to devote to 1.) Partying 2.) Sleeping 3.) Girls 4.) My Major 5.) Work
 
2013-01-28 03:18:48 PM  

ajgeek: No kidding. If even a quarter of the students in the room WANTED to be there I'd have a much better experience. Nowadays people are there because their parents/recruiter/parole officer told them to.

/I want to be here.
//but the damn kids really make it hard for me to get educated.


I'd love to be there, if I actually wanted to be there, and were I not obligated to do so by a degree program created by people who believe that "well rounded" implies that I need to take as many classes as possible that have, at best, only the thinnest and most tenuous of a remote connection to what I actually want to study. Clearly "Bisexual Asian Thespian Philosophy Studies" is going to help me wrap up those few credits I missed out on 15 years ago so I could complete my MS.

Universities and colleges are dedicated to education in the same way that the DMV is dedicated to efficiency and rapidity.
 
2013-01-28 03:20:33 PM  

MrEricSir: FTA: The rest of the period will be spent in class discussion, which by week three will have settled into an "Inside the Actor's Studio"-esque conversation between me and one or two consistently prepared students whom the rest of you will quietly despise.

Ouch. Mostly because that person was usually me. Not because I'm the smartest or most talkative, but because at the very least I'd bother to skim the chapter a few minutes before class and consult Wikipedia.


He missed the students that believe in quantity over quality of participation.
 
2013-01-28 03:25:57 PM  

Glenford: MrEricSir: FTA: The rest of the period will be spent in class discussion, which by week three will have settled into an "Inside the Actor's Studio"-esque conversation between me and one or two consistently prepared students whom the rest of you will quietly despise.

Ouch. Mostly because that person was usually me. Not because I'm the smartest or most talkative, but because at the very least I'd bother to skim the chapter a few minutes before class and consult Wikipedia.

He missed the students that believe in quantity over quality of participation.


So when a professor spends 50% of the class saying "So who can tell me x? Anyone? Anyone?" and no one is responding, you consider that to be quality participation?
There's a reason most students don't answer -- they didn't bother to do the reading and they're too lazy/hungover to fake it.
 
2013-01-28 03:26:07 PM  
A shiatty professor teaching at a shiatty school is bitter and blames the students? Say it ain't so...
 
Ant
2013-01-28 03:27:17 PM  
I've only been to community college, but I was astounded at how many people just whine and complain about the dumbest things.

Yes, I also stayed up until 3 AM to finish the thesis paper that I knew was due today, but that's my fault for putting it off, not the teacher's. Quit making your pathetic excuses. I'm embarrassed for you.

/I think paying for school myself helped put things into the proper perspective.
 
2013-01-28 03:27:26 PM  
in these chilly months i can't help but notice the similarities between skiers and campus creeps. both dress like they are in a music video, sport the lamest facial hair and are flying quickly downhill in a big hurry to get nowhere. the over privileged dooshbag pool is both deep and wide.
 
2013-01-28 03:28:08 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2013-01-28 03:28:46 PM  
Please note that Scott is excellent at ferreting out plagiarism, particularly the incompetent, undergraduate variety in which the writing style veers from Late Caveman to Deconstructivist within a single paragraph.

So much this. Sudden font changes are also a giveaway.
 
2013-01-28 03:29:12 PM  
7 years of college down the drain...
 
2013-01-28 03:33:23 PM  

Bondith: Please note that Scott is excellent at ferreting out plagiarism, particularly the incompetent, undergraduate variety in which the writing style veers from Late Caveman to Deconstructivist within a single paragraph.

So much this. Sudden font changes are also a giveaway.


No, the hyperlink footnotes are the giveaway

/Not mine - a colleague's
 
2013-01-28 03:36:47 PM  
Being the mean TA is actually kind of fun.
 
2013-01-28 03:37:56 PM  
This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.
 
2013-01-28 03:38:54 PM  

MrEricSir: Glenford: MrEricSir: FTA: The rest of the period will be spent in class discussion, which by week three will have settled into an "Inside the Actor's Studio"-esque conversation between me and one or two consistently prepared students whom the rest of you will quietly despise.

Ouch. Mostly because that person was usually me. Not because I'm the smartest or most talkative, but because at the very least I'd bother to skim the chapter a few minutes before class and consult Wikipedia.

He missed the students that believe in quantity over quality of participation.

So when a professor spends 50% of the class saying "So who can tell me x? Anyone? Anyone?" and no one is responding, you consider that to be quality participation?
There's a reason most students don't answer -- they didn't bother to do the reading and they're too lazy/hungover to fake it.


I'm referring to the students who insist on talking in class despite the fact that they didn't bother to do the reading.
 
2013-01-28 03:41:31 PM  
I'm pleased to say that this article did not reflect my university experience. Well, except maybe for a couple of classes, but those were fortunately few and far between, and non-existent after my second year.
 
2013-01-28 03:41:45 PM  

MrEricSir: FTA: The rest of the period will be spent in class discussion, which by week three will have settled into an "Inside the Actor's Studio"-esque conversation between me and one or two consistently prepared students whom the rest of you will quietly despise.

Ouch. Mostly because that person was usually me. Not because I'm the smartest or most talkative, but because at the very least I'd bother to skim the chapter a few minutes before class and consult Wikipedia.


Oh my god why the hell were the rest of them in college, much less attending class regularly? Wasn't that silence after the professor posed a question awkward as fark? I guess mom & dad had the costs covered.

Psychotic friend of the wife raised hell when they required in-class participation in her law school. They designated each student a day. SILLINESS.
 
2013-01-28 03:42:02 PM  
the money is in the banana stand:

When I went to college, I did not want to take any of the "Core curriculum" classes. My AP high school classes were more involved, and some of which were actually offered THROUGH a university for college credit. It did not matter that I receive nearly perfect scores on most of my AP tests, the colleges decided not to accept the credits, or, they decided it sufficed a Junior level course - but - I STILL had to take the introductory level freshman course (makes perfect sense right).

Did I WANT to go to college? Yes. Did I WANT to take a bunch of BS courses until I got to the stuff that mattered and counted towards my major? No. I wasted a good 3 years of pointless crap before I got into anything decent and worth my time. I rarely ever showed up to class, yet was a 4.0 student. I am not a genius by any means, I just know to read the farking materials and do any assignments. For the most part, college is a memory game. A short term one. Most of my finals were not comprehensive but just the last part of the semester's material.



Same here...only I never had a 4.0 GPA.
 
2013-01-28 03:42:48 PM  
Students actually read those?
 
2013-01-28 03:44:24 PM  

PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.


That's the same year my grandmother died. What are the odds???
 
2013-01-28 03:45:47 PM  

Glenford: I'm referring to the students who insist on talking in class despite the fact that they didn't bother to do the reading.


Ugh, those kids always changed the discussion to another book they hadn't read - the Bible.
 
2013-01-28 03:47:41 PM  

phalamir: Bondith: Please note that Scott is excellent at ferreting out plagiarism, particularly the incompetent, undergraduate variety in which the writing style veers from Late Caveman to Deconstructivist within a single paragraph.

So much this. Sudden font changes are also a giveaway.

No, the hyperlink footnotes are the giveaway

/Not mine - a colleague's


I had a roommate freshman year who was asking me for help proofreading one of his papers. I gave it back to him and told him to select all and make sure all of the fonts/sizes were the same. Then to remove all of the hyperlinks. I'm not sure he even did that. Needless to say that was his first/last semester.
 
2013-01-28 03:47:52 PM  

PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.


U mad, snowflake? The rules apply to everyone, not just the slackers.
 
2013-01-28 03:48:11 PM  

PsyLord: Students actually read those?


I'm in college for the second time (got a Law & Society BA the first time around - gainfully employed but want to get a CS degree now), and I read every syllabus VERY carefully, taking note of deadlines and policies.  Admittedly, it's also because I have a full time job, but still.
 
2013-01-28 03:48:24 PM  

PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.


your anger is misdirected. You shouldn't be mad at the prof, but rather the other 30 students who missed the quiz because their grandmothers also died...again.

If he lets you miss the quiz without documentation, then he has to let everyone miss quizzes without documentation, and that would never get abused. Nope never.

I got sick of excuses and trying to validate them and everything else. So I adopted the policy of your lowest test score gets dropped. If you miss two tests, too bad, you apparently have life getting in the way too much for college at the moment.

Most policies exist because someone was trying to game the system.
 
2013-01-28 03:48:30 PM  

phalamir: Bondith: Please note that Scott is excellent at ferreting out plagiarism, particularly the incompetent, undergraduate variety in which the writing style veers from Late Caveman to Deconstructivist within a single paragraph.

So much this. Sudden font changes are also a giveaway.

No, the hyperlink footnotes are the giveaway

/Not mine - a colleague's


You know it's really bad when the title of the paper is actually another plea for a donation from Jimmy Wales.
 
2013-01-28 03:50:32 PM  

WhippingBoy: PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.

That's the same year my grandmother died. What are the odds???


I refer to myself as the Granny-Killer. I have an almost prescient ability to schedule quizzes, exams, and due dates to coincide with mass biddie extinction events. If you want the old girl gone, just sign up for my class, and she is a goner

/Yeah, I know, not really. But you would think I was Scourge of the Blue-Hairs considering what I hear the night before an exam
//Still not as boggling as the girl who told me with a straight face she would be missing the exam because her third cousin was in the hospital for out-patient surgery, and that the whole family had to pick up sticks and decamp at the hospital so they could pray for the cousin.
 
2013-01-28 03:51:43 PM  

Hyjamon: PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.

your anger is misdirected. You shouldn't be mad at the prof, but rather the other 30 students who missed the quiz because their grandmothers also died...again.

If he lets you miss the quiz without documentation, then he has to let everyone miss quizzes without documentation, and that would never get abused. Nope never.

I got sick of excuses and trying to validate them and everything else. So I adopted the policy of your lowest test score gets dropped. If you miss two tests, too bad, you apparently have life getting in the way too much for college at the moment.

Most policies exist because someone was trying to game the system.


Meh, it was his policy, not mine.  When it came time for reviews (he wasn't tenured), he did NOT get a favorable one from me.  My school took those very seriously.

You don't want to cut me slack?  That's fine.  I will work with it.  But I'm sure as sh*t not cutting YOU any slack.
 
2013-01-28 03:54:02 PM  

PrivateCaboose: PsyLord: Students actually read those?

I'm in college for the second time (got a Law & Society BA the first time around - gainfully employed but want to get a CS degree now), and I read every syllabus VERY carefully, taking note of deadlines and policies.  Admittedly, it's also because I have a full time job, but still.


I would say that you are the exception. From my experience, most students do not. Hell, I can probably stick a clause in my syllabus declaring that they they must sacrifice their next of kin for the 2nd exam to pass the exam and they probably wouldn't notice it.
 
2013-01-28 03:54:15 PM  

phalamir: WhippingBoy: PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.

That's the same year my grandmother died. What are the odds???

I refer to myself as the Granny-Killer. I have an almost prescient ability to schedule quizzes, exams, and due dates to coincide with mass biddie extinction events. If you want the old girl gone, just sign up for my class, and she is a goner

/Yeah, I know, not really. But you would think I was Scourge of the Blue-Hairs considering what I hear the night before an exam
//Still not as boggling as the girl who told me with a straight face she would be missing the exam because her third cousin was in the hospital for out-patient surgery, and that the whole family had to pick up sticks and decamp at the hospital so they could pray for the cousin.


I only have real-sick-family examples.  This is a work example, but pretty indicative of my boss: My co-worker's brother-in-law wound up having a major heart event (don't think it was an attack?) and was getting major surgery (in his 30s).  There was a real question as to whether he was going to pull through.  So co-worker went home to be with her family.  When she got back after BIL pulled through, thank God, our boss pulled her into her office and told the co-worker that she was abusing our boss's flexibility and kindness by taking time to go home and be with her family.

And yet, when her mom was sick, she was gone for a week.

Hypocrisy, how does it work?
 
2013-01-28 03:54:55 PM  

PsyLord: PrivateCaboose: PsyLord: Students actually read those?

I'm in college for the second time (got a Law & Society BA the first time around - gainfully employed but want to get a CS degree now), and I read every syllabus VERY carefully, taking note of deadlines and policies.  Admittedly, it's also because I have a full time job, but still.

I would say that you are the exception. From my experience, most students do not. Hell, I can probably stick a clause in my syllabus declaring that they they must sacrifice their next of kin for the 2nd exam to pass the exam and they probably wouldn't notice it.


18-22 year olds also have much less to lose than 25+ year old students who are paying out of pocket and trying to change their careers and lives.
 
2013-01-28 03:55:00 PM  
This is pretty accurate for any of the humanities courses that I was forced to attend during my engineering degree. I took a philosophy class as a mandated humanities elective one semester. On the first day the professor literally told the whole class, this class has a writing credit associated with it if you do not need a writing credit you should consider taking Phil #### (I can't remember the number now) as it's the same material but without a heavy writing load. I looked over the assignments and saw at most 15 pages of required writing over the whole semester. So of course for every assignment the professor agreed to give extensions to the whole class because a few people whined about the deadline. That's why nobody wants to be there, and nobody respects the class or the school if you treat young adults like children they will act like them.
 
2013-01-28 04:02:54 PM  
Why universities were created:

because books were so expensive that people had to travel to towns and have them read to them. It's why senior academics in some UK universities are called "readers".
 
2013-01-28 04:03:09 PM  

PsyLord: PrivateCaboose: PsyLord: Students actually read those?

I'm in college for the second time (got a Law & Society BA the first time around - gainfully employed but want to get a CS degree now), and I read every syllabus VERY carefully, taking note of deadlines and policies.  Admittedly, it's also because I have a full time job, but still.

I would say that you are the exception. From my experience, most students do not. Hell, I can probably stick a clause in my syllabus declaring that they they must sacrifice their next of kin for the 2nd exam to pass the exam and they probably wouldn't notice it.


I sometimes wish I hadn't lost my syllabus for one of my grad school classes/had challenged the grade I got immediately.

Basically, I got a B+ when, I'm 99.9% certain, the syllabus said I should have gotten an A-. (Not a huge difference, but in gradschool every tiny bit can help). by the time I realized this and the grades came out, Ic ouldn't find my copy of the syllabus (and the syllabus had vanished from their website). And I guess I felt it would be petty to challenge that small bump of a grade, but... eh. It was frustrating, I suppose.
 
2013-01-28 04:06:16 PM  

PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.


You wouldn't believe how often you get that excuse and how rarely it is true.
 
2013-01-28 04:06:28 PM  
Here's how the textbook section should have been written:

Textbooks: University policy requires that every class have at least 1 textbook or course reader because how can a college class be a college class without readings? Because I'm too lazy to put together a course reader that contains readings specifically relevant to my lectures and topics covered in class, you have to buy 5 books/textbooks for this class, some of which cost over $85/each. And because I am a dick, you may not use previous editions which could be purchased used for a few dollars. You must get the latest edition. And it's purely coincidental that all of the books happen to be printed by my publisher, that I'm good friends with two of the authors, and that I wrote one of the books. Purely coincidence.
 
2013-01-28 04:06:30 PM  
My favorite syllabus of all time had the following line on it...

"Papers are due by 5:00PM on the due date. That is to say I have an alarm clock sitting in my office. It goes off at 5PM. I will get up from my desk and look out the door in both directions. If I see you coming, paper in hand, your paper is not late. If by the time I poke my head back in the door I do not see you then your paper is late. I do not care who died. I do not care what happened to your car. I do not care care what is wrong with your computer. May i suggest assuming the due date is the day before and planning for such?"
 
2013-01-28 04:08:53 PM  
Meh, angry, cynical article from a guy who isn't a full-time prof and is simply hammering a stereotype to drum up hits on his site and sales of his own book. I've been a prof for almost nineteen years and students are better than that, and, thankfully, so are professors. What a wasted green light, mods.
 
2013-01-28 04:10:25 PM  
I liked the part about making sure you have purchased the textbooks. I may have to steal the toilet paper line when one of my students who hasn't bought the books pitches a fit when I hand out a quiz based on the readings.

/Professor
//getting a kick
//etc.
 
2013-01-28 04:10:30 PM  

GAT_00: PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.

You wouldn't believe how often you get that excuse and how rarely it is true.


Regardless, the amount of stress it added to me to get a CERTIFIED copy of a death certificate to my professor, while trying to arrange to go from DC to Long Island to the funeral, and packing all of my books because I didn't want to get behind, was ridiculous.  He wouldn't accept my parents calling him.  He would only accept a stamped death certificate.

I hope you have to do that when someone in your family dies if you think that's ok to ask of a grieving student.
 
2013-01-28 04:11:27 PM  

everlastinggobstopper: I liked the part about making sure you have purchased the textbooks. I may have to steal the toilet paper line when one of my students who hasn't bought the books pitches a fit when I hand out a quiz based on the readings.

/Professor
//getting a kick
//etc.


You don't even need to purchase the textbooks.  Many times, if you plan ahead, your library has copies you can borrow.  That's what I did for some of my stuff.
 
2013-01-28 04:14:32 PM  

PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.


CSB: I had some issues my last quarter of school. I'd lost my ride since it only paid for 4 years, and most engineering degrees take longer than that. So, I was living back at home rather than deal with a short lease, but it meant an hour+ commute each way, plus working almost full time to support myself. I'm not saying it's not do-able, and many people do. It was just a radical change in my schedule, that made me have difficulties keeping up in my Artificial Intelligence CS class.

I bombed the final to my AI class, having focused on studying much different material than was presented on the test. My professor initially gave me a "Sorry about your luck response" when I begged for some way to prove that I was competent enough in the subject to pass (and thus graduate and start my job).

Then I got an e-mail from him the next day offering some extra credit for me that would give me the chance to at least pull a 'C'. I guess he'd contacted the college office, and realized that I was an A/B student, and figured I wasn't giving him a snow-job.
 
2013-01-28 04:16:10 PM  

PrivateCaboose: GAT_00: PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.

You wouldn't believe how often you get that excuse and how rarely it is true.

Regardless, the amount of stress it added to me to get a CERTIFIED copy of a death certificate to my professor, while trying to arrange to go from DC to Long Island to the funeral, and packing all of my books because I didn't want to get behind, was ridiculous.  He wouldn't accept my parents calling him.  He would only accept a stamped death certificate.

I hope you have to do that when someone in your family dies if you think that's ok to ask of a grieving student.


Link

Exam days are bad news for grandparents...

/not peer reviewed
 
2013-01-28 04:19:30 PM  

PrivateCaboose: Hyjamon: PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.

your anger is misdirected. You shouldn't be mad at the prof, but rather the other 30 students who missed the quiz because their grandmothers also died...again.

If he lets you miss the quiz without documentation, then he has to let everyone miss quizzes without documentation, and that would never get abused. Nope never.

I got sick of excuses and trying to validate them and everything else. So I adopted the policy of your lowest test score gets dropped. If you miss two tests, too bad, you apparently have life getting in the way too much for college at the moment.

Most policies exist because someone was trying to game the system.

Meh, it was his policy, not mine.  When it came time for reviews (he wasn't tenured), he did NOT get a favorable one from me.  My school took those very seriously.

You don't want to cut me slack?  That's fine.  I will work with it.  But I'm sure as sh*t not cutting YOU any slack.


No they don't. They just tell the students that so they fill them out. Student evaluations of teachers are almost worthless. For starters, about the only students who fill them out are ones who received bad grades "The teacher failed me." The students who enjoyed the class or got something out of it rarely don't do much but fill in the bubbles and don't leave comments. I love student evaluation day because students think it's their chance to "get back" at the teacher. From my own classes I have had these two comments: "Most disorganized teacher ever" "Most organized teacher ever." Those two students were sitting in the same class.

My favorite category of evaluation: "Instructor knows the material." How would a student have any clue how well the teacher knows the material?

I am someone who reviews faculty and I get to see the evaluations. We are just trying to spot a trend. One angry evaluation, ignore. Twenty comments about a negative behavior, then I will address it with the faculty. Behavior continues after talking, then we have issues. Otherwise, they don't reflect much on the professor.

There was an article (that I cannot find) that showed how students and faculty interpret the evaluation questions differently. Example I can remember: Instructor was organized. Faculty interpret this as organized lecture, order of topics, syllabi etc. Students interpret this based on how fast the assignments were returned. The reasoning being, if the instructor is organized, then we should all get back our 15 page reports in two days.
 
2013-01-28 04:19:40 PM  

PsyLord: PrivateCaboose: GAT_00: PrivateCaboose: This pisses me off a little, because we had a quiz coming up when my grandmother actually did die my sophomore year (from Alzheimer's disease).  One professor made me get the death certificate from my parents.

As a student who regularly participated in all of my classes and showed up to them all barring serious illness (after freshman year, anyway), I was pretty annoyed that he assumed I was trying to shirk the quiz, especially when I was getting As on everything in his class.

You wouldn't believe how often you get that excuse and how rarely it is true.

Regardless, the amount of stress it added to me to get a CERTIFIED copy of a death certificate to my professor, while trying to arrange to go from DC to Long Island to the funeral, and packing all of my books because I didn't want to get behind, was ridiculous.  He wouldn't accept my parents calling him.  He would only accept a stamped death certificate.

I hope you have to do that when someone in your family dies if you think that's ok to ask of a grieving student.

Link

Exam days are bad news for grandparents...

/not peer reviewed


It wasn't an exam.  It was a quiz worth about 10% of our grade.  And I went to every one of my professors with the obituary stating when the funeral was to take place.

He was the only asshole who demanded a death certificate.  Try and justify it all you want, that's being an asshole and creating a much more painful time for someone grieving the death of a loved one.

But I'm glad to see that all of the professors in here don't give a shiat about when a student is ACTUALLY grieving.
 
2013-01-28 04:21:30 PM  

PrivateCaboose: everlastinggobstopper: I liked the part about making sure you have purchased the textbooks. I may have to steal the toilet paper line when one of my students who hasn't bought the books pitches a fit when I hand out a quiz based on the readings.

/Professor
//getting a kick
//etc.

You don't even need to purchase the textbooks.  Many times, if you plan ahead, your library has copies you can borrow.  That's what I did for some of my stuff.


Yeah, I try to get a copy of each textbook I use on reserve in the library. Half the time a publisher will send me two copies because they can't keep their records straight, so it's really not hard to do.

Part of me feels that students should just buy the damn book(s); it's part of being in college. Then I see the prices they charge and think that helping a student motivated enough to go to the library and get a book they need is the least I can do.
 
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