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(Slate)   Paperwork, middle management, and red tape are actually useful, at least in terms of helping companies turn profit   (slate.com) divider line 28
    More: Interesting, middle management, Davos, social enterprise, Basic Books, student tests, World Economic Forum, Accenture, London School of Economics  
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5871 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jan 2013 at 10:02 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-28 09:12:05 AM  
www.the-leaping-lamp.com

A company, is like a clock, subby.
 
2013-01-28 10:07:11 AM  
What about spending all day on Fark?
 
2013-01-28 10:08:38 AM  
Subby, what would you say ya do around here?
baltimoresportsreport.com
 
2013-01-28 10:18:54 AM  
First, better management produces more efficient companies that boost economic output, which may ultimately translate into higher incomes and wealth for the world's poor.


I spotted their problem right off the bat.
 
2013-01-28 10:18:58 AM  

Glenford: Subby, what would you say ya do around here?
[baltimoresportsreport.com image 652x352]


I recently used that image in a school presentation. I was so pleased, but so disappointed at the percentage of students who got the joke.
 
2013-01-28 10:19:01 AM  
I know mine could be replaced with an email forward. Oh you said good management
 
2013-01-28 10:24:41 AM  
Agree with the headline:

resources3.news.com.au
 
2013-01-28 10:30:30 AM  
Hot Cocoa Sampler gift boxes for TEH WORLD!
 
2013-01-28 10:32:25 AM  
FTA: "There are spectacularly well-managed firms in all of these countries-the China Telecoms and Tatas of the world-but the average firm has a lot to gain from some managerial guidance and expertise."

Let me slim that down: "spectacularly well-managed ... Tatas."

I vote that this thread be henceforth devoted to spectacularly well-managed Tatas.
 
2013-01-28 10:46:01 AM  
Reads like a fluff piece devoted to sucking a consulting company's cock.
 
2013-01-28 10:46:47 AM  

TabASlotB: FTA: "There are spectacularly well-managed firms in all of these countries-the China Telecoms and Tatas of the world-but the average firm has a lot to gain from some managerial guidance and expertise."

Let me slim that down: "spectacularly well-managed ... Tatas."

I vote that this thread be henceforth devoted to spectacularly well-managed Tatas.


cdnimg.visualizeus.com

Something something something... take dictation... something.
 
2013-01-28 10:57:44 AM  
FTFA: Out of chaos, order arose: Supply closets were no longer strewn about with yarn, factory floors were cleaned up, inventory and control processes improved production line efficiency. The benefits of good management were such that Accenture's services-which were provided to the companies for free as part of the experiment-would have paid for themselves through greater profitability within a year: The researchers estimated a profit increase of more than $300,000 annually as a result of management improvements, as compared with the $250,000 market price of the consulting services they received.

I get tired of hearing this Accenture story. If your best idea is "Don't keep shiat on the floor" maybe you shouldn't be a consultant. (And maybe that yarn company should be out of business.)
 
2013-01-28 10:58:01 AM  
In my experience, middle-management gets a bad rap.

Increasingly, the entry-level white-collar workers at an average firm are lacking experience and organization skills. And at the other end of the spectrum, there are legions of "National Managers" and "VPs" who genuinely believe it's their job to sit in meetings and talk about working all the live-long day. It's the middle-manager who's actually accountable for getting shiat done these days.

And as for "paperwork"... same deal. Too many people think that picking up the phone and gabbing with a rep at a supplier is the same thing as a work order. Because, hey, with no paper trail, there's always plausible deniability over what farked-up direction was given, and what farked-up deadline was communicated.
 
2013-01-28 11:31:13 AM  

Gunny Walker: FTFA: Out of chaos, order arose: Supply closets were no longer strewn about with yarn, factory floors were cleaned up, inventory and control processes improved production line efficiency. The benefits of good management were such that Accenture's services-which were provided to the companies for free as part of the experiment-would have paid for themselves through greater profitability within a year: The researchers estimated a profit increase of more than $300,000 annually as a result of management improvements, as compared with the $250,000 market price of the consulting services they received.

I get tired of hearing this Accenture story. If your best idea is "Don't keep shiat on the floor" maybe you shouldn't be a consultant. (And maybe that yarn company should be out of business.)


I think Feng Shui is underrated. When I first started my job things were only chaotic because people were so disorganized. The office was not set up properly. Everything did not have a place. People would complete work on a file and throw it onto a large "file table" in the back of the room that they all planned to get to...at some point. Anything that did not have a designated drawer or area got thrown on to the file table. As a result, it was impossible to investigate old issues unless you spent an hour digging through papers. The staff that was here had gotten so used to doing things the hard way that they didn't even realize how much extra work they were giving themselves. I reorganized the office to give everything a designated place. You can no longer lay a file down. If you are not working on it then it belongs in the drawer. I had facilities move the large cabinets that were blocking their windows so that they could get some sunlight. We created stations so that the work could flow from one stage of processing to the next and we created a system to track files in real time so that people could be held accountable if they held an issue for too long. We run like a machine now. Its a lot less stressful than it was.
 
2013-01-28 11:55:44 AM  
HMS_Blinkin:
Glenford: Subby, what would you say ya do around here?
[baltimoresportsreport.com image 652x352]

I recently used that image in a school presentation. I was so pleased, but so disappointed at the percentage of students who got the joke.


Given how long it's been since Office Space came out, you might as well have been referencing "Bringing Up Baby" or something.
 
2013-01-28 11:58:57 AM  

DROxINxTHExWIND:

I think Feng Shui is underrated. When I first started my job things were only chaotic because people were so disorganized... We created stations so that the work could flow from one stage of processing to the next and we created a system to track files in real time so that people could be held accountable if they held an issue for too long. We run like a machine now. It's a lot less stressful than it was.


Arranging the workstations in process order and keeping the tools near the techs that use them really does reduce stress and wasted time. I reorganized the shipping desk I worked at and cut 5-8 hours off my workweek. The boss gave me a sweet raise that more than made up for the loss of overtime.

Also, the Six Sigma and 5-S stuff can be quite helpful in identifying flaws in a process, because it's true that "if it can be measured, it can be improved." In the hands of a micromanager, though? That could be a nightmare.
 
2013-01-28 12:06:54 PM  
Apparently true that middle management and red tape are the prime reason for both Failure and Profit

Senators to Probe Air Force's $1 Billion Failed Software
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-01-28 12:24:03 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: I think Feng Shui is underrated. When I first started my job things were only chaotic because people were so disorganized. The office was not set up properly. Everything did not have a place. People would complete work on a file and throw it onto a large "file table" in the back of the room that they all planned to get to...at some point. Anything that did not have a designated drawer or area got thrown on to the file table. As a result, it was impossible to investigate old issues unless you spent an hour digging through papers. The staff that was here had gotten so used to doing things the hard way that they didn't even realize how much extra work they were giving themselves. I reorganized the office to give everything a designated place. You can no longer lay a file down. If you are not working on it then it belongs in the drawer. I had facilities move the large cabinets that were blocking their windows so that they could get some sunlight. We created stations so that the work could flow from one stage of processing to the next and we created a system to track files in real time so that people could be held accountable if they held an issue for too long. We run like a machine now. Its a lot less stressful than it was.


I really kept waiting for this to turn into a Bel-Air or Pocket Ninja style tale.

/Now I'm just thinking of Futurama - How Hermes Requisitioned His Groove Back
//My Hermes got that hellhole running so efficiently that all the physical labour is now done by a single Australian man.
 
2013-01-28 12:24:31 PM  

Gunny Walker: FTFA: Out of chaos, order arose: Supply closets were no longer strewn about with yarn, factory floors were cleaned up, inventory and control processes improved production line efficiency. The benefits of good management were such that Accenture's services-which were provided to the companies for free as part of the experiment-would have paid for themselves through greater profitability within a year: The researchers estimated a profit increase of more than $300,000 annually as a result of management improvements, as compared with the $250,000 market price of the consulting services they received.

I get tired of hearing this Accenture story. If your best idea is "Don't keep shiat on the floor" maybe you shouldn't be a consultant. (And maybe that yarn company should be out of business.)


It's not just taking a broom and sweeping up the floor then cleaning out of closets that they're talking about. It is about GETTING ORGANIZED. Being able to match up orders with the amount of raw materials required, then tracking the production process of those raw materials as they are being processed, checking all parts of the production cycle for waste. It is about maintaining an inventory that will almost exactly meet customer needs without having excesses or being short (lost profit or delays, which translate into lost profit)

Slate knows it but they don't want to say it. Capitalism's goal is the most efficient flow of resources from those who have it to those who need it, not just with money. This consulting firm flowed their resources of knowledge to that Indian company who needed it. They just filled in the truth with some wealth envy about Davos
 
2013-01-28 01:17:31 PM  

Mutated-Snoopy: DROxINxTHExWIND: I think Feng Shui is underrated. When I first started my job things were only chaotic because people were so disorganized. The office was not set up properly. Everything did not have a place. People would complete work on a file and throw it onto a large "file table" in the back of the room that they all planned to get to...at some point. Anything that did not have a designated drawer or area got thrown on to the file table. As a result, it was impossible to investigate old issues unless you spent an hour digging through papers. The staff that was here had gotten so used to doing things the hard way that they didn't even realize how much extra work they were giving themselves. I reorganized the office to give everything a designated place. You can no longer lay a file down. If you are not working on it then it belongs in the drawer. I had facilities move the large cabinets that were blocking their windows so that they could get some sunlight. We created stations so that the work could flow from one stage of processing to the next and we created a system to track files in real time so that people could be held accountable if they held an issue for too long. We run like a machine now. Its a lot less stressful than it was.

I really kept waiting for this to turn into a Bel-Air or Pocket Ninja style tale.

/Now I'm just thinking of Futurama - How Hermes Requisitioned His Groove Back
//My Hermes got that hellhole running so efficiently that all the physical labour is now done by a single Australian man.



Well, I do have dreadlocks. So there's that.
 
2013-01-28 01:25:52 PM  
"About 50% of the human race is middlemen and they don't take kindly to being eliminated."
Captain Malcolm Reynolds, "War Stories"
FIREFLY
 
2013-01-28 01:34:26 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: Mutated-Snoopy: DROxINxTHExWIND: I think Feng Shui is underrated. When I first started my job things were only chaotic because people were so disorganized. The office was not set up properly. Everything did not have a place. People would complete work on a file and throw it onto a large "file table" in the back of the room that they all planned to get to...at some point. Anything that did not have a designated drawer or area got thrown on to the file table. As a result, it was impossible to investigate old issues unless you spent an hour digging through papers. The staff that was here had gotten so used to doing things the hard way that they didn't even realize how much extra work they were giving themselves. I reorganized the office to give everything a designated place. You can no longer lay a file down. If you are not working on it then it belongs in the drawer. I had facilities move the large cabinets that were blocking their windows so that they could get some sunlight. We created stations so that the work could flow from one stage of processing to the next and we created a system to track files in real time so that people could be held accountable if they held an issue for too long. We run like a machine now. Its a lot less stressful than it was.

I really kept waiting for this to turn into a Bel-Air or Pocket Ninja style tale.

/Now I'm just thinking of Futurama - How Hermes Requisitioned His Groove Back
//My Hermes got that hellhole running so efficiently that all the physical labour is now done by a single Australian man.


Well, I do have dreadlocks. So there's that.


But can you limbo?
 
2013-01-28 02:02:36 PM  
I'm empowered, which is nice. The term sounds like management BS, but even though I'm at the bottom rung of my company, I'm authorized to allocate my budget to spend wherever I think it would benefit us most. I'm allowed to make short-vs-long-term decisions. I have a weekly update and an annual review. That's it. No hovering, no direct orders. Every interaction I have with my manager is an on-the-level conversation where arguments are allowed and innovation is my responsibility.

All this is Corporate America. What a country!
 
2013-01-28 02:07:29 PM  

Elroydb: It's not just taking a broom and sweeping up the floor then cleaning out of closets that they're talking about.


Then why bother mentioning it in the story? Say you jump Snake River Canyon, how much time do you spend on the boring stuff?
"Whelp, I knew it was going to be a big day so I wore my Hanes ankle cut crew socks, but I didn't have any clean. So, first I went to the clothes hamper grabbed all the dirty socks and underwear and put them in the wash. I then put in TWO scoops of Tide detergent. I've been pooping myself a lot lately thinking about this jump. So while that was washing, I  watched a very lovely special on coral reefs..."
**Yawn.**
Tell me cool stuff like how you completely redesigned the factory floor and the renovations were paid for by the money they saved in six months. Tell me how you analyzed their supply chain to minimize stoppage in work. Tell me how you saved the company by selling old cardboard bales to a recycler. But installing racks to stop storing things on the floor? That's idiotic. Here's a WaPo story about it from 2010 And even it states that a lot of efficiencies came after Accenture.
 
2013-01-28 02:28:48 PM  

TabASlotB: FTA: "There are spectacularly well-managed firms in all of these countries-the China Telecoms and Tatas of the world-but the average firm has a lot to gain from some managerial guidance and expertise."

Let me slim that down: "spectacularly well-managed ... Tatas."

I vote that this thread be henceforth devoted to spectacularly well-managed Tatas.


UNmanaged is better - if linked and tagged with the magic acronym.

/ book, marked.
 
2013-01-28 03:22:07 PM  
Absolutely. Working at a well-managed company is awesome. It's not fun to spend all your day on stupid bullshiat, and all the people making sure you're following the way things are supposed to be done seem annoying until you have to sub in for somebody else and there are no surprises because they've been doing it right.

Yes, our overhead is higher than that of our competitors, but we have work out the wazoo because it gets done right the first time.
 
2013-01-28 03:40:34 PM  
So a bunch of management consultants take some of the worst-managed companies, apply obvious fixes and the result is a more efficient workplace.

Now they're hoping a bunch of CEOs from highly organised western companies will fork over a lazy few million for their services after reading the article and wanting to appear to be "doing something" for their excessive bonuses.

Who knew?
 
2013-01-28 05:32:40 PM  

darth_shatner: So a bunch of management consultants take some of the worst-managed companies, apply obvious fixes and the result is a more efficient workplace.

Now they're hoping a bunch of CEOs from highly organised western companies will fork over a lazy few million for their services after reading the article and wanting to appear to be "doing something" for their excessive bonuses.

Who knew?


Hey, efficiency consultants have starving babies to feed, too, okay?
 
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