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(Mother Jones)   More quinoa is being produced now than ever before. That's good. But it's being planted instead of traditional crops. That's bad. But farmers in South America are less impoverished. That's good. But now they want Coca-Cola. That's...bad, apparently   (motherjones.com) divider line 74
    More: Interesting, South America, Food and Agriculture Organization, Evo Morales, Facebook fans, Andes, crops, farmers, food insecurity  
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4715 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jan 2013 at 7:20 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-27 09:51:30 PM
So these farmers get a more comfortable life by selling their crops to insufferable hipsters in the States? I fail to see how these folks getting a more rounded diet and a higher standard of living is a bad thing?
 
2013-01-27 09:52:27 PM
Dear farmers, please stop. That shiat is nasty.
 
2013-01-27 09:56:28 PM
As someone who is a half ass colombian i never saw it when i was living in andes.

Most south americans eat beef beans chicken and rice. Mainstays.

Latin americans would be fat if they had cars and did not have to walk around at high altitudes.

Plus they fry everthing in old oil and cook with lard.
 
2013-01-27 09:56:38 PM
LadyHawke:
How do you deal with them?

Purge them. Purge them with the unholy fire of a 1000 suns

Or, you know, you accept all their invitations over for dinner and bring a decent wine so as to guarantee future invites.


Oh, judging from attitude alone, I think it's reasonable to assume that the odds of him selecting a decent wine are approaching zero.
 
2013-01-27 10:00:48 PM

cmb53208: So these farmers get a more comfortable life by selling their crops to insufferable hipsters in the States? I fail to see how these folks getting a more rounded diet and a higher standard of living is a bad thing?


These farmers sell to a government coop who set the buy price locally then the coop sells it for ten times the price
. the farmers are lucky to break even.
 
2013-01-27 10:21:44 PM

farkin_noob: MaxSupernova: I obviously have to greatly refine my cooking technique because when I made it for the first time two weeks ago I didnt care much for the texture or flavor.

I'll keep experimenting with it to see if I can make it better.

Are you rinsing it really well? Try toasting it before you boil it. I use about a half of a cup of chicken broth. Along with red pepper flakes and fresh ground pepper.


Yeah I rinsed it really well but did not try toasting. Stupid question....do you rinse, toast, boil or toast, rinse, boil?
 
2013-01-27 10:23:58 PM

big pig peaches: Don't you see? It's bad because the indigenous people who have been basically living in the stone age since the stone age, will now have access to electricity and TVs and roads and schools and hospitals and medicine.


They may or may not gain access to those things. If they do, will they be affordable for the average person, or will they be so expensive as to require borrowing money, perhaps against land titles for security, with default (e.g., if and when quinoa prices crash) leading to landlessness. And "stone age" is a complete misunderstanding of history (and pre-history), but it's a nice ethnocentric euphemism for "unlike us."

And it's sad because all of us who have enjoyed these things our whole lives understand that their lives where so much better when their lives were simple, because all of secretly wish we could live that simpler life

The jury is still out on whether electronic technology, commodities, and mass media entertainment is really "better" than locally meaningful ways of life, intensive social relationships and a sense of collective connectedness. At the very least, one might wonder about the anomie and alienation characteristic of industrial society, not to mention the population level health impacts of modern diets and ways of life - heart disease, diabetes, etc at higher rates than in more "traditional" societies. Roads, schools, hospitals and medicine are all wonderful innovations with positive and negative social, ecological, and biophysical effects. Roads and schools are at least as much about incorporating people into the global economy, usually at the margins or in a position of disadvantage, as they are about "lifting people out of poverty" (as the World Bank sometimes describes it). Hospitals and medicine are great - if you can afford them. They work better in some places than in others, and for some people (and classes) than others. Medicine, unfortunately, is also only as good as technology as the people who use it, and judging by the increasing numbers of drug-resistant infections, we're not using them very well.


in a dirt hut watching our children and loved ones die at nature's whim. Who wants to live past forty anyway?

It's nice to see people rehearsing a 400 year old argument (probably older, but let's work with Hobbes). First of all, this is a common misunderstanding of how life expectancy is calculated. The low numbers for times and places with less wealth and less access to medical are not because people only lived for 40 years on average before being felled by preventable infections, or violence, or other means - in fact, infant mortality has a huge effect on population life expectancy. When infant mortality drops, population level life expectancy goes up. In many rural societies today and throughout history, once people made it to 5 or 6, they had a pretty reasonable chance of living into their 60s, 70s, or beyond. But a lot of babies died before they reached 5 (and they still do). Besides, if commodification of local crops - or the introduction of cash crop monoculture farming - results in rampant land speculation and dispossession of poorer folks by richer, more powerful ones, as it often has in the past, the rise in poverty for people displaced as an unintended consequence of this "development" opportunity often leads to ill-health and lower quality of life.

Also, this whole image of non-western people and societies as "savages" whose lives were "nasty, brutish, and short" (yes, that's the same sentiment reproduced above, in Hobbes' famous formulation), is based on a limited, and perhaps willfully distorted understanding of the lives of people being "discovered" by European explorers in the 16th and 17th Centuries. It's ethnocentric, at best, and has a lot more to do with Hobbes' arguments that the natural state of humanity (illustrated by non-civilized, non-Europeans) was one of war of all against all, justifying the creation and operation of a strong state to impose peace and bring about improvements. In fact, when the lives of "non-civilized" people were and are particularly rough, it is often a result of colonization, exploitation, and marginalization, carried out by the powerful and influential in order to further their own progress and accumulation.

I don't imagine that social change can be avoided or prevented, nor do I think it should, necessarily. But we need to pay a lot more attention to what kind of real impacts these processes have on people's well-being, their ability to meet their needs, and their autonomy. The economists dream of simply commodifying everything so that people can use their strengths and resources to compete in a free market is a fantasy that ignores the unequal ground that people are currently on.

So, if you're going to eat quinoa (and it is tasty), look for sustainable, socially-just varieties and brands. Otherwise you might actually be inadvertently contributing to the kind of negative outcomes that the "quinoa is evil" reports are claiming.
 
2013-01-27 10:25:43 PM

Maggie_Luna: WhippingBoy: How do you tell if you're dealing with a douche-bag "foodie".

1. They serve "quinoa"
2. They serve "prosciutto"
3. Their balsamic vinegar has a "vintage"

How do you deal with them?

Purge them. Purge them with the unholy fire of a 1000 suns

Oh, good I'm not a douchebag (nor a foodie). I like quinoa and serve it if you asked me to cook because a whole "I like the food in that kind of diet" way not "i'm better than you" way. I have no idea what prosciutto is too. Ham? I don't eat pork so...google says pork.


You're not missing anything with prosciutto. Tastes like plastic wrap mated with rancid saltmeat.
 
2013-01-27 10:31:54 PM
I don't understand how anyone can eat quinoa. It has a sharp smell to me, like the smell of steel when you are grinding it.
 
2013-01-27 10:41:34 PM

WhippingBoy: 3. Their balsamic vinegar has a "vintage"


I'm going to assume no one has explained to them that a common term for vinegar is "wine that has gone bad".
 
2013-01-27 10:52:52 PM

CowardlyLion: Maggie_Luna: WhippingBoy: How do you tell if you're dealing with a douche-bag "foodie".

1. They serve "quinoa"
2. They serve "prosciutto"
3. Their balsamic vinegar has a "vintage"

How do you deal with them?

Purge them. Purge them with the unholy fire of a 1000 suns

Oh, good I'm not a douchebag (nor a foodie). I like quinoa and serve it if you asked me to cook because a whole "I like the food in that kind of diet" way not "i'm better than you" way. I have no idea what prosciutto is too. Ham? I don't eat pork so...google says pork.

You're not missing anything with prosciutto. Tastes like plastic wrap mated with rancid saltmeat.


You don't typically just eat it alone, though you could. Almost every time I use it it's to render out and use to start a cream sauce, helps the whole texture but.

Though by definition it -is- rancid (fermented) salt pork.
 
2013-01-27 11:10:47 PM

MaxSupernova: farkin_noob: MaxSupernova: I obviously have to greatly refine my cooking technique because when I made it for the first time two weeks ago I didnt care much for the texture or flavor.

I'll keep experimenting with it to see if I can make it better.

Are you rinsing it really well? Try toasting it before you boil it. I use about a half of a cup of chicken broth. Along with red pepper flakes and fresh ground pepper.

Yeah I rinsed it really well but did not try toasting. Stupid question....do you rinse, toast, boil or toast, rinse, boil?


Rinse, let dry a bit, toast, boil. Toasting it first helps make it fluffy. Depending on what else I'm having I'll add veggies to it. Mushrooms and red peppers are really yummy mixed in.
 
2013-01-27 11:15:37 PM
Subby, quinoa is pretty damn traditional and old.  It asks other crops to get off its lawn.
 
2013-01-27 11:39:53 PM
Why is this? The gods must be crazy.
 
2013-01-28 01:37:05 AM

MaxSupernova: farkin_noob: MaxSupernova: I obviously have to greatly refine my cooking technique because when I made it for the first time two weeks ago I didnt care much for the texture or flavor.

I'll keep experimenting with it to see if I can make it better.

Are you rinsing it really well? Try toasting it before you boil it. I use about a half of a cup of chicken broth. Along with red pepper flakes and fresh ground pepper.

Yeah I rinsed it really well but did not try toasting. Stupid question....do you rinse, toast, boil or toast, rinse, boil?


Rinse well, and you don't have to toast it in oil. I boil mine with veggie stock (or bouillon cubes), but chicken works well too, I add sliced sun dried tomatoes (the dry kind), crushed garlic, other seasonings. When it's done, you should see the shell be spiral (it's a seed), and you fluff it like rice.

I occasionally add a touch of olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
 
2013-01-28 01:42:30 AM
 
2013-01-28 02:43:25 AM
Quinoa is tasty. In a pinch it can be substituted in hundreds of dishes for anything from couscous to rice. I love sauteeing mushrooms and veggies and tossing them in finished quinoa. It can be a tad bland if you don't add seasoning (duh) so don't expect to like it if you're used to the high-fat / high-salt American "standard" and are trying it plain. Also, proscuitto is nasty!
 
2013-01-28 02:54:18 AM

WhippingBoy: How do you tell if you're dealing with a douche-bag "foodie".

1. They serve "quinoa"
2. They serve "prosciutto"
3. Their balsamic vinegar has a "vintage"

How do you deal with them?

Purge them. Purge them with the unholy fire of a 1000 suns


Whippingboy's average daily intake:
Poptarts and mountain dew for the breakfast
Hotpockets, fritos, and a milkshake for lunch
Macaroni and cheese or beef jerky for a snack
whatever his fat face can find at a drive-thru for dinner.


I'll stick to my "foodie" recipes and outlive him by 25 years. Quinoa and a good vinegar are in any good kitchen. Proscutto is terrible though.
 
2013-01-28 03:21:19 AM

theflatline: cmb53208: So these farmers get a more comfortable life by selling their crops to insufferable hipsters in the States? I fail to see how these folks getting a more rounded diet and a higher standard of living is a bad thing?

These farmers sell to a government coop who set the buy price locally then the coop sells it for ten times the price
. the farmers are lucky to break even.


Not really.
 
2013-01-28 07:13:03 AM

MaxSupernova: farkin_noob: MaxSupernova: I obviously have to greatly refine my cooking technique because when I made it for the first time two weeks ago I didnt care much for the texture or flavor.

I'll keep experimenting with it to see if I can make it better.

Are you rinsing it really well? Try toasting it before you boil it. I use about a half of a cup of chicken broth. Along with red pepper flakes and fresh ground pepper.

Yeah I rinsed it really well but did not try toasting. Stupid question....do you rinse, toast, boil or toast, rinse, boil?


Was it crunchy? You may not have cooked it long enough. That was my mistake the first couple of times I made it.

I love quinoa. A couple years ago had quinoa chocolate cake at a Peruvian restaurant. It was made with whole quinoa not quinoa flour or anything so my friend and I were a little taken aback at first by the texture but it was delicious.
 
2013-01-28 07:27:13 AM

SquiggsIN: Proscutto is terrible though.


Proscuitto is really tasty. Wrapped around a piece of shrimp, or finely chopped into a tomato sauce. Spread over pizza like a proscuitto blanket? Yum.
 
2013-01-28 09:00:31 AM
(from TFA) "But that doesn't mean we should stop eating quinoa; it just means we shouldn't eat quinoa without thinking it through."

So, keep eating it, just do so with a large side order of guilt?

WhippingBoy: How do you tell if you're dealing with a douche-bag "foodie".

1. They serve "quinoa"
2. They serve "prosciutto"
3. Their balsamic vinegar has a "vintage"

How do you deal with them?

Purge them. Purge them with the unholy fire of a 1000 suns


It's all in the attitude. If you're served any of the randomly chosen items from the list and the provenance of each item is breathlessly described in an effort to impress, yes. Purge them. Of course, WhippingBoy probably would have been with the folks that felt that Chef-Boy-Ar-Dee and Kikkoman were foodie douchbags for introducing Italian-esque and Chinese-ey dishes to the meat/potatoes/2-veg Ammurikan diet.

IMHO, a fanfare-less served quinoa salad with shallots and fresh field peas served with prosciutto wrapped asparagus with a balsamic reduction drizzle sounds like a pretty awesome lunch to me.
 
2013-01-28 10:42:55 AM

dc0012c: IMHO, a fanfare-less served quinoa salad with shallots and fresh field peas served with prosciutto wrapped asparagus with a balsamic reduction drizzle sounds like a pretty awesome lunch to me.


Sounds a lot like greens and grits with bacon to me.
 
2013-01-28 10:02:31 PM

Inaditch: Coca-cola is a horrible product. It has no redeeming qualities aside from mixing well with spirits. Terrible stuff.


You go to hell! You go to hell and you die!

/mmmm... Mexicoke...
 
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