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(AlterNet)   Yes, It Has   (alternet.org) divider line 160
    More: Obvious, dictators, mass unemployment, C. Wright Mills  
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20668 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jan 2013 at 10:13 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-27 08:41:07 PM

Heraclitus: With the end of the Cold War the military-industrial complex has been trying to justify its existence.

Without an external locus for its paranoia and aggressiveness it has to find an internal enemy.

Even if it has to manufacture one.


What brand of foil do you use to make your hats?
 
2013-01-27 09:00:26 PM

Wayne 985:
Yes, showing a passport and photo ID when you're getting on a plane is like being searched by the Gestapo. One minute you're showing a driver's license and the next you're being shipped to Obama's gas chambers.


While I'm not disagreeing with you with your collective comments here, you're quite angry about it. The question of who pissed in your cornflakes comes into play. I do hope you're not the Fox News Angry White Male type since you seem to be fairly grounded in reality.
 
2013-01-27 09:10:27 PM

chuggernaught: The 1st Amendment keeps us free. And before any of you gun nuts opens their mouth about the 2nd Amendment protecting that right, I'd just like to point out that MLK would disagree with you.


I personally believe that the entirety of the Bill of Rights keep us free, and removing any single one of them will quickly unravel the rest. Hell, even infringing a bit makes us less free.

I don't like free speech zones. I don't like magazine bans. I don't like the 4th amendment loophole the Supreme Court put in for DUIs. I really don't like that the 9th and 10th Amendments apparently don't exist to the courts anymore. I think the 8th is violated by Sex Offender lists. While they are in jail and/or probation, fine, put them on the list. Once their sentence is complete, take them off. It's bullshiat to keep punishing someone post-sentence. If you think they need harsher sentencing, build it into the initial sentence. Don't continue punishing people after you've already punished them.
 
2013-01-27 09:45:36 PM

portnoyd: Wayne 985:
Yes, showing a passport and photo ID when you're getting on a plane is like being searched by the Gestapo. One minute you're showing a driver's license and the next you're being shipped to Obama's gas chambers.

While I'm not disagreeing with you with your collective comments here, you're quite angry about it. The question of who pissed in your cornflakes comes into play. I do hope you're not the Fox News Angry White Male type since you seem to be fairly grounded in reality.


I don't like whining, stupidity, and ungratefulness. It's honestly that simple.

Suburban kids who have every luxury afforded to them thinking they're oppressed remind me of spoiled toddlers. The US government isn't perfect, but we're being pampered compared to what happens in most of the rest of the world.

Douchebags are afforded the right to bash their own homes, but if they get patted down on a plane, they sincerely think they're comparable to people whose families were bulldozed into mass graves.
 
2013-01-27 10:28:40 PM

nicoffeine: How many people in this thread are under the sword of arrest for what they've said here?

Anyone?


Let's be serious for a minute. If someone here were arrested for their comments, you'd never know. Unless you knew them personally, there are any number of reasons they'd suddenly stop posting, and you wouldn't be able to tell if it was because they gave up on the thread or were dragged away by the police.

So your question, which is very condescending to people who have fought hard to protect the freedom of speech, is ironic in that you'd never be able to get an answer if the arrests were actually happening.
 
2013-01-27 10:29:25 PM

nicoffeine: How many people in this thread are under the sword of arrest for what they've said here?

Anyone?


All of us. Every man jack of us. If you don't realize by now that America has become a totalitarian Communist dictatorship under the iron fist of Shartbama, then I don't know what more to tell you.
 
2013-01-28 01:10:47 AM
Let's look at what happens to people saying things our government (and the wealthy who own our government) really don't like people to say.

Laura Poitras, an Oscar-and Emmy-nominated filmmaker and journalist has produced multiple documentaries on how the American "war on terror" has effected the lives of people in the Middle East.

The New York Times stated that Poitras has produced "two of the most searching documentaries of the post-9/11 era, on-the-ground chronicles that are sensitive to both the political and the human consequences of American foreign policy."

Her next film will will examine the way in which The War on Terror has been imported onto U.S. soil, with a focus on the U.S. Government's increasing powers of domestic surveillance, its expanding covert domestic NSA activities (including construction of a massive new NSA facility in Bluffdale, Utah), its attacks on whistleblowers, and the movement to foster government transparency and to safeguard Internet anonymity. In sum, Poitras produces some of the best, bravest and most important filmmaking and journalism of the past decade, often exposing truths that are adverse to U.S. government policy, concerning the most sensitive and consequential matters

Now here is a great example of someone saying something the government does not like. Let's see if she gets harassed for it.

Poitras' work has been hampered, and continues to be hampered, by the constant harassment, invasive searches, and intimidation tactics to which she is routinely subjected whenever she re-enters her own country. Since the 2006 release of "My Country, My Country," Poitras has left and re-entered the U.S. roughly 40 times. Virtually every time during that six-year-period that she has returned to the U.S., her plane has been met by DHS agents who stand at the airplane door or tarmac and inspect the passports of every de-planing passenger until they find her (on the handful of occasions where they did not meet her at the plane, agents were called when she arrived at immigration). Each time, they detain her, and then interrogate her at length about where she went and with whom she met or spoke. They have exhibited a particular interest in finding out for whom she works.

She has had her laptop, camera and cellphone seized, and not returned for weeks, with the contents presumably copied. On several occasions, her reporter's notebooks were seized and their contents copied, even as she objected that doing so would invade her journalist-source relationship. Her credit cards and receipts have been copied on numerous occasions. In many instances, DHS agents also detain and interrogate her in the foreign airport before her return, on one trip telling her that she would be barred from boarding her flight back home, only to let her board at the last minute. When she arrived at JFK Airport on Thanksgiving weekend of 2010, she was told by one DHS agent - after she asserted her privileges as a journalist to refuse to answer questions about the individuals with whom she met on her trip - that he "finds it very suspicious that you're not willing to help your country by answering our questions." They sometimes keep her detained for three to four hours (all while telling her that she will be released more quickly if she answers all their questions and consents to full searches).


Why yes. Yes she is.

Regularly.
Perhaps the regular assholes from the Politics Tab will explain why none of this counts.
 
2013-01-28 01:25:45 AM

BullBearMS: Perhaps the regular assholes from the Politics Tab will explain why none of this counts.


Uh, it is Glenn Greenwald writing, and therefore not worth the electrons it is wasting.

I mean, the guy is horrific self absorbed asshat Julian Assange's biggest fan, and wept openly at the fact that Poor Brad didn't get a pillow while soldiers in his Division were dying in Afghanistan.
 
2013-01-28 01:35:08 AM

halfof33: Uh, it is Glenn Greenwald writing, and therefore not worth the electrons it is wasting.


Well, he is a real liberal who constantly ripped Bush a new asshole for pulling this sort of shiat, but who didn't suddenly start making excuses when Obama continued and expanded the Bush policies.

I can see why you're quite so butthurt about him.
 
2013-01-28 02:16:15 AM
Here's Laura Poitras discussing another recent work on the New York Times:

It took me a few days to work up the nerve to phone William Binney. As someone already a "target" of the United States government, I found it difficult not to worry about the chain of unintended consequences I might unleash by calling Mr. Binney, a 32-year veteran of the National Security Agency turned whistle-blower. He picked up. I nervously explained I was a documentary filmmaker and wanted to speak to him. To my surprise he replied: "I'm tired of my government harassing me and violating the Constitution. Yes, I'll talk to you."

Two weeks later, driving past the headquarters of the N.S.A. in Maryland, outside Washington, Mr. Binney described details about Stellar Wind, the N.S.A.'s top-secret domestic spying program begun after 9/11, which was so controversial that it nearly caused top Justice Department officials to resign in protest, in 2004.

"The decision must have been made in September 2001," Mr. Binney told me and the cinematographer Kirsten Johnson. "That's when the equipment started coming in." In this Op-Doc, Mr. Binney explains how the program he created for foreign intelligence gathering was turned inward on this country. He resigned over this in 2001 and began speaking out publicly in the last year. He is among a group of N.S.A. whistle-blowers, including Thomas A. Drake, who have each risked everything - their freedom, livelihoods and personal relationships - to warn Americans about the dangers of N.S.A. domestic spying.


Oh, look. Somebody else being harassed by the government for saying things they don't like.

I suppose it doesn't count since they weren't just outright disappeared.
 
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